Matt Eich – I Love You, I’m Leaving

Matt Eich

I Love You, I’m Leaving

[ EPF 2017 – FINALIST ]

My introduction to photography was in childhood, as my grandmother was dying of Alzheimer’s disease. The hopelessness of her plight triggered something within me, and when my grandfather handed me a camera, making photographs became a way of stabilizing the insecurity of memory and accessing emotional resonance. If we are at risk of forgetting too much of our world, and ourselves, photography is the antidote.

I created this work during a time of general domestic unease, when my parents separated after 33 years of marriage, my siblings all experienced drastic changes in their lives and my wife, children and I moved to a new city.

The title of this series, I Love You, I’m Leaving, stems from the constant rhythm of my peripatetic life. It holds true when I leave my family to photograph strangers, and leave strangers to return home.

 

 

 

This series borrows from personal experience, and the visual language of the everyday in order to create a fictional account that mirrors my reality. Photographs are reductions, distillations, half-truths and complete fabrications. They can only describe the surface of things, while I am interested in the intangible – memory and emotional resonance.

 

 

Despite our intimacy, the people I am closest to are unknowable, and will always remain a mystery to me. I photograph with the knowledge that our place in this world is tenuous, comprised of little more than memory and story. Memory is fragile; the moments are fleeting and have to be wrestled into a permanent state.

 

 

Short Bio

Matt Eich (b. 1986) is a portrait photographer, and photographic essayist working on long-form projects about the American condition. He is a Professional Lecturer of Photography at George Washington University and lives in Charlottesville, Virginia with his wife and two daughters.

Matt’s work has been widely exhibited and received numerous grants and recognitions, including PDN’s 30 Emerging Photographers to Watch, the Joop Swart Masterclass, an Aaron Siskind Fellowship, and two Getty Images Grants for Editorial Photography. Matt’s prints are held in the permanent collections of The Portland Art Museum, the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, The New York Public Library, Chrysler Museum of Art and others.

Eich studied photojournalism at Ohio University and holds an MFA in Photography from Hartford Art School’s International Limited-Residency Program. He has published two monographs, with three book publications scheduled between 2018 and 2020.

 

Related Links

 

matteichphoto.com

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The Emerging Photographer Fund is supported by generous donors to the Magnum Foundation

Magnum Foundation

Marta Giaccone – Systems of Harmony

Marta Giaccone

Systems of Harmony

[ EPF 2017 – FINALIST ]

Systems of Harmony is a personal portrait of 2016 suburban America. In the 19th century a large number of Europeans and Americans went to great lengths to establish small utopian communities throughout America. They were preachers, social reformers, industrialists, philosophers, anarchists, journalists and socialist thinkers who attracted large crowds to their intentional colonies. Nevertheless they were exclusive establishments, some religious in character, that saw in the vastness of the American wilderness a favorable economic, political and social environment. They didn’t last long: some a few months, others a few years.

I traveled to many of these former utopias drawn by their often evocative and tenderly pretentious names such as Utopia, New Harmony or Modern Times, out of curiosity for what those places look like now and wondering where America is, 150 years later.

 

 

There was German Pietist preacher George Rapp who created the Harmony Society (1805-1906) and, together with his Harmonites, aspired to be worthy of Christ and prepare for his return by purifying himself through celibacy, which turned out to be the main cause of their failure, as it prevented new members from within.

 

 

In Welsh industrialist Robert Owenss model working community (1826-1828), work and the enjoyment of its results should be experienced communally. In his idea of reorganization of society there was no private property, which, together with no individual sovereignty, again led to failure.

And then there was John Humphrey Noyes’ sect of Perfectionists (1848-1880), who created the practice of “stirpiculture” by which the male members should obey to continence and only the most spiritually advanced ones, first of all Noyes himself, were encouraged to procreate in order to produce superior offspring.

I used these and many more background stories as the basis to create my own trip around America.

 

 

Short Bio

 

Marta Giaccone (1988, Milan, Italy) received an MA in Documentary Photography at the University of South Wales, UK, in 2014 and a BA in English and Hispanic American Literatures at the University of Milan, Italy, in 2011. Her work focuses on issues related to family and youth with a particular interest in the feminine perspective. She is also drawn to the juxtapositions of cultures and ideologies found within contemporary American society. Her practice evolves through long-term documentary projects shot on medium and large format film for a more intimate approach. She has worked for Richard Mosse as a production assistant for “Incoming”; for Magnum Photos NYC, Bruce Davidson, Alessandra Sanguinetti and Mary Ellen Mark as an intern; for Mark Power and Olivia Arthur as a translator. She has been among the finalists of many prizes and taken part in group shows in England, Wales, Italy and the US. Her first solo show “Ritorno all’Isola di Arturo” opens in Procida, Italy, in Sept 2017.

 

Related Links

 

martagiaconne.com

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The Emerging Photographer Fund is supported by generous donors to the Magnum Foundation

Magnum Foundation

Wiktoria Wojciechowska – Sparks

Andriy, 27, astronomy graduate, picture was taken after he spent 9 months in the war zone, March 2015, Ukraine.

Wiktoria Wojciechowska

Sparks

[ EPF 2017 – HONORABLE MENTION ]

Sparks is a multi-dimensional portrait of a contemporary war in Europe, forgotten but still actual, the war in Ukraine. Ukrainians are fighting against the separatists, who are Ukrainians as well, driven by Russia’s influence and support. The core of the project is meeting victims of the war and dealing with aspects of the conflict like its influence, the impact on the environment and the lives of ordinary people, from late 2014 until 2016.

 

 

The title Sparks refers to the burning pieces of missiles that mercilessly pierce the walls of people’s homes. The light of explosions reflects in faces and memories of the victims. History is told in unconventional way using documentary photography, portraits, collages, videos and collected materials from the soldiers.

 

Portraits of young, non-professional soldiers form the backbone of the project. They went to fight in their sneakers, with weapons stolen from a museum, with all the fears and problems that any of us may encounter. They left their previous identities and occupations: philosopher, mechanic, astronomer, music DJ, bank assistant or high school students – none of them were prepared for what they were to experience. Whoever survives, is no longer the same person.

Sparks is still an ongoing project with the aim to depict next the changes which are happening in the country, consumed by war.

 

 

 

Short Bio

Photographer and Multimedia artist, Born in Lublin, Poland. Graduated from Academy of Fine Arts in Warsaw, Poland. In 2015 she became the Winner of Oskar Barnack Leica Newcomer Award and received awards for her project “Short Flashes” – portraits of drenched cyclists captured on the streets of metropolises in China. Nominated for: Joop Swart Masterclass 2016, Unseen Young Talents, Lucie Foundation Emerging Artists, Visura Grant, Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation Prize and Foam Paul Huf Award. She took part artist residencies in Iceland, China and France. Her works were presented during the solo exhibitions and international art and photo festivals, published in magazines: British Journal of Photography, L’Oeil de la photographie, Vice, Leica Fotografie International, FT Weekend Magazine, Guardian.

Her first book “Short Flashes” published by Bemojake came out in May 2016.

 

Related Links

wiktoriawojciechowska.com

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The Emerging Photographer Fund is supported by generous donors to the Magnum Foundation

Magnum Foundation

Sarah Pabst – Zukunft

My grandmother 1938, 18 years old.

Sarah Pabst

Zukunft

[ EPF 2017 – HONORABLE MENTION ]

I was still standing on a northern corner.
Moonlit winter clouds the color of the desperation of wolves.
Proof of Your existence? There is nothing but.
(Franz Wright)

Between 1933-1945 Germany and many parts of Europe were dominated by Nazism and World War II. 72 years later, the traumatic experiences of this period are still present in Europe. Memories are associated with pain, violence and threat. In Germany in particular, this legacy took the form of guilt in post-war generations, ashamed by the events and their place in history. This work is traversed by that history. My grandparents survived the war and just as many of their generation they have passed away and now their memories will soon be part of the past.

I always ask myself, what if. What if I had been born at the same time as my grandmother, what if the Waffen-SS had hanged my grandfather for running away with young Rumanian prisoners of war, what if the US-troops had arrived some hours later? Future is unpredictable, things can turn either way. What if my sister had been married to a jew not now but 80 years ago? And questions one can’t answer – Why are people capable of deporting children, men, women, entire families to their sure death?

 

 

My project is a series of questions, of a past that lives in us, of wounds we inherit from our forefathers. I heard their stories of life, suffering, hunger, guilt and death, and not only obedience but also resistance against the Nazi regime. Finally, these memories, their memories, became part of mine. Through them, I build and shape my own ones, the past, the present and thereby, also the future.

 

In September 2016 my brother died of sudden cardiac death. Suddenly, future came down on us. This project is dedicated to him.

 

Short Bio

Sarah is a German-born (1984) documentary photographer and painter based in Buenos Aires, Argentina since 2013. Besides her personal intimate work she mainly focuses on women and identity topics. Her work has been exhibited both nationally and internationally.

Her work has received international recognition being a finalist in Arles’ Voies Off, Athens Photo Festival, Organ Vida Festival, Nano Festival and the Gomma Grant, all 2017. She was nominated for the JS Masterclass twice. She was a winner of the Portfolio Revisions at FoLa and selected twice for Descubrimientos Photo España. In 2015 she won a 3rd Prize at the POY LATAM and the Canon Profifoto Grant 2014. Her work was published in California Sunday Magazine, GUP, Bloomberg, Vice, Lensculture, Le Monde Dipl., and Juxtpoz, among others.

She owns a masters degree in Fine Arts and Spanish (University of Cologne and Wuppertal, 2011) where she also worked as an adjunct lecturer from 2012-15.

 

Related Links

 

sarahpabst.com

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The Emerging Photographer Fund is supported by generous donors to the Magnum Foundation

Magnum Foundation

Aleksey Kondratyev – Ice Fishers

 

Aleksey Kondratyev was the recipient of the 2017 Fujifilm/Young Talent Award for this essay. This honor recognizes photographers under 25 and grants $5,000 from Fujifilm to continue the work.

Aleksey Kondratyev

Ice Fishers

[ FUJIFILM/YOUNG TALENT AWARD 2017 WINNER ] 

For generations, Kazakh fishers have set out on to the frozen Ishim River in the hope of catching fish beneath the ice. The Ishim flows through the country’s capital, Astana, a high-rise, futuristic city that was built essentially from scratch in the 1990s when Kazakhstan started to benefit from the exploitation of its oil reserves. It’s supposed to be an emblem of post-Soviet modernity, a hallmark of the country’s nationhood.

Many of these fishermen venture on to the ice, braving temperatures that often reach -40 degrees (north-central Kazakhstan is the second coldest populated region in the world, after Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia). While they fish, they protect themselves from the harsh weather with salvaged pieces of plastic, patched together from discarded packaging or rice bags that you can find outside markets selling western, Chinese and Russian goods.

 

 

I was interested in examining the aesthetic forms of these improvised protective coverings and the way in which they functioned as inadvertent sculptures. I chose to focus on the materials and their surfaces as signifers of underlying global in influence and the improvisation that occurs as a result of economic necessity.

Kazakhstan was once a nomadic country, and vestiges of that way of life still exist despite the country’s embracement of modernity. These ice fishers improvise and adapt to their environment in ingenious ways, just as their forebears did.

 

 

Short Bio

Aleksey Kondratyev (b. 1993 in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan) is a photographer based in Los Angeles. His work examines the cultural conflation and diversion between the West and post-Soviet spheres of identity. Kondratyev’s work has been exhibited at the Neue Schule für Fotografie, Berlin, Germany, the Benaki Museum in Athens, Greece, the Museum of Contemporary Art Rome, Rome, Italy, and Galleria Foto-Forum in Bolzano, Italy. He recently completed a fellowship at FABRICA, Benetton’s Communication Center and is a current M.F.A. candidate at the University of California, Los Angeles

 

Related Links

alekseykondratyev.com

 

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The Fujifilm/Young Talent Award is supported by Fujifilm

 

FujiFilm_Basic-Black

Antoine Bruy – Outback Mythologies

Hole, Coober Pedy, Australia.

 

Antoine Bruy was the recipient of the 2017 Emerging Photographer Fund and was granted $10,000 for this essay. Burn Magazine revolves around the EPF and it is our most important curatorial contribution to the oftentimes chaotic landscape of photography today. Most importantly, our mission is to give recognition to the finest emerging authors out there and to provide some funding to keep going and to continue making a mark.

Antoine Bruy

Outback Mythologies: The White Man’s Hole

[ EPF 2017 WINNER ]

Everything starts about hundred years, in 1915, when the New Colorado Gold Prospecting Syndicate, consisting of a Mr Jim Hutchison, his 14 years old son William and two other men had been unsuccessfully prospecting for gold out in the middle of nowhere in South Australia. The young Willie had been left in camp to look after their supplies but disobeyed orders and wandered off to search for water around the foothills of a nearby range. There was a degree of apprehension among the men when he failed to turn up after dark. But a short time later, he strode into camp with a grin on his face. Over his shoulder was slung a sugar bag full of opal. The catalyst for the existence of the future town of Coober Pedy had been discovered.

 

 

Today in Coober Pedy, the work is secluded. Climatic conditions almost unbearable. Each prospecting gives place to an uninterrupted broom of machines of all kinds and noises coming to populate the emptiness of the land. In an iterative way, men dig white mountains to draw most of the time only a few precious dust. The Australian town of opal is isolated on the edge of the red lands of the Outback. The hamlet experienced the golden age of rock mining in the 60s to 80s, when the price of diesel was cheap.

 

 

Today, the mining enclave seems totally disaster-stricken. And yet, some of its inhabitants have taken up residence underground, in artifact concretions called dug-out. The population is the guardian of myriad holes like as many thousand stories. It is estimated that around 750,000 to 3 million holes have been dug around the city. The town tries hard to reconvert itself in the tourism by forging a past and hosts from time to time shooting of international films. Coober Pedy makes a clean sweep of personal past to create a collective story.

“The White Man’s Hole” is the second chapter of an on-going project titled “Outback Mythologies” consisting of six chapters all taking place in the Australian Outback.

 

 

Short Bio

Antoine Bruy (1986) is a french photographer graduated from the Vevey School of Photography in Switzerland in 2011. His work studies people and their relationship to privacy, their physical environment, and to the economic and intellectual conditions that determine them. His work has been shown in group shows: Los Angeles, New-York, Paris, Dhaka, Barcelona, Seoul, Angkor. Bruy has been awarded LensCulture Emerging Talent Awards, Getty Images Emerging Talent Awards, Critical Mass 2014 and PDN’s 30 in 2015. His photographs have been featured in publications including The New Yorker, The Washington Post, The Guardian, WIRED, Slate, The Huffington Post and Le Monde. He is currently based in Lille, France.

 

Related Links

antoinebruy.com

 

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The Emerging Photographer Fund is supported by generous donors to the Magnum Foundation

Magnum Foundation

EPF 2017 – The Winners

 

The Emerging Photographer Fund 2017

 

Hole, Coober Pedy, Australia.

Antoine Bruy

Outback Mythologies

EPF 2017 WINNER – $10,000

Everything starts about hundred years, in 1915, when the New Colorado Gold Prospecting Syndicate, consisting of a Mr. Jim Hutchison, his 14 years old son William and two other men had been unsuccessfully prospecting for gold out in the middle of nowhere in South Australia. The young Willie had been left in camp to look after their supplies but disobeyed orders and wandered off to search for water around the foothills of a nearby range. There was a degree of apprehension among the men when he failed to turn up after dark. But a short time later, he strode into camp with a grin on his face. Over his shoulder was slung a sugar bag full of opal. The catalyst for the existence of the future town of Coober Pedy had been discovered.

 

 

Honorable Mentions:

 

My brother Milan and his youngest daughter. My grandmother had lost two brothers in the war. As a child I listened to her stories, saw her grief and was always scared my brother would not come back. Many years later one of my biggest horrors would become reality. He died of sudden cardiac death in September 2016.

Sarah Pabst – Zukunft

 

 

 

"The squad of nine killed and eight wounded.? Most of the voluntary soldiers during the first months of the war were not registered. Therefore it is hard to estimate the actual number of deaths and injuries. Collage on picture from the mobile phone's archive of one soldier. 2015, Ukraine.

Wiktoria Wojciechowska – Sparks

 

 

 

Emerging Photographer Fund 2017 – Finalists:

(in alphabetical order)

Elena Anosova
Antoine Bruy
Matt Eich
Marta Giaccone
Mariya Kozhanova
Sebastian Liste
Sarah Pabst
Michele Palazzi
Alexey Shlyk
Mayumi Suzuki
Mario Wezel
Wiktoria Wojciechowska

 

 

 

 

The EPF FujiFilm/Young Talent Award 2017

 

Aleksey Kondratyev

Ice Fishers

FUJIFILM/YOUNG TALENT AWARD 2017 WINNER – $5,000

 

 

FujiFilm/Young Talent Award 2017 – Runners up:

(each win a FujiFilm camera)

Caleb Stein – Down by the Hudson

Neha Hirve – Full Shade / Half Sun

Lily Zoumpouli – Selinophilia

Ian Hananto – Futile

Jeroen Bocken – The Celebrated Remedy for the Cure of Disorder

 

 

FujiFilm/Young Talent Award 2017 – Finalists:

(in alphabetical order)

Jeroen Bocken
Karim El Maktafi
Jordan Gale
Ian Hananto
Neha Hirve
Joel Karppanen
Aleksey Kondratyev
Manon Lanjouère
Sigurður Páll Pálsson
Caleb Stein
Lily Zoumpouli

 

 

The full essays of the winners and finalists will be published here on BURN over the next few weeks. Stay tuned!

 

 

Emerging Photographer Fund 2017 – Judges:

(in alphabetical order)

 

Alessia Glaviano | Senior Photo Editor, Vogue Italia

Wayne Lawrence | Photographer

Newsha Tavakolian | Photographer, Magnum Photos

Teun van der Heijden | Photobook Designer, Heijdens Karwij

James Wellford | Senior Photo Editor, National Geographic

 

 

 

 

Previous EPF Winners

 

The 2008 Emerging Photographer Fund grant was awarded to
Sean Gallagher for his essay on the environmental Desertification of China.

The 2009 Emerging Photographer Fund grant was awarded to
Alejandro Chaskielberg for his 8×10 format essay on the Parana River Delta ‘The High Tide’.

The 2010 Emerging Photographer Fund grant was awarded to
Davide Monteleone for his essay ‘Northern Caucasus’.

The 2011 Emerging Photographer Fund grant was awarded to
Irina Werning for her essay ‘Back to the Future’.

In 2012 three Emerging Photographer Fund grants were awarded:
one major to Matt Lutton for his essay ‘Only Unity’ and
two minors to Giovanni Cocco for his essay ‘Monia’ and to Simona Ghizzoni for her essay ‘Afterdark’.

In 2013 four Emerging Photographer Fund grants were awarded:
one major to Diana Markosian for her essay ‘My Father The Stranger’ and
three minors to: Iveta Vaivode for her essay ‘Somewhere on Disappearing Path’,
Oksana Yushko for her essay ‘Balklava: The Lost History’ and
Maciej Pisuk for his essay ‘Under The Skin; Photographs From Brzeska Street’.

In 2014 two Emerging Photographer Fund grants were awarded:
one major to Alessandro Penso for his essay ‘Lost Generation’ and
one minor to: Birte Kaufmann for her essay ‘The Travelers’.

In 2015 the Emerging Photographer Fund was awarded to Danila Tkachenko for ‘Restricted Areas’, and
the FujiFilm Young Talent Award to Sofia Valiente for ‘Miracle Village’.

In 2016 the Emerging Photographer Fund was awarded to Annie Flanagan for ‘Deafening Sound’, and
the FujiFilm Young Talent Award to Aleksander Raczynski for ‘Views’

 

 

Editor’s note:

 

I cannot express my thanks enough to Alessia, Newsha, Teun, Jamie and Wayne. They worked together to finely tune their choices, looked at the finalists from every angle and awarded the EPF grants to the photographers they felt most deserving. Of course, once it got down to the finalists, choices became extremely difficult, but that is a given… and they did an admirable job. Thank you.

 

A heart felt thank you also to Fujifilm for making it possible for the EPF to keep focus on the future generations, the young ones, the ones with a vision already making a mark now… and just might make another jump soon…

 

FujiFilm_Basic-Black

 

Burn Magazine revolves around the EPF. Our most important curatorial contribution
to the oftentimes chaotic landscape of photography today. By choosing a jury whose lifetimes have been spent in looking
at photographs and making photographs, we try to give our Burn readers a distilled version of the best work of all that
flows before their eyes everyday.

 

Most importantly our mission is to give recognition to the finest emerging authors out there and to provide some funding to at least
a few to keep going and to continue making a mark. Our previous winners prove this is not in vain.

 

Many thanks especially to my EPF team Anton Kusters, Diego Orlando, and Francesca Gennari.
First off, they must deal with me!! Never easy. In all seriousness, they all show amazing dedication to the spirit of
doing something which just feels good. To provide a platform for the up and coming.
 

 
Special thanks to Susan Meiselas of the Magnum Foundation. Nobody on the planet is more dedicated to allowing new talent to develop.
 
 
Special thanks also to Michael Loyd Young, EPF funder and BURN Magazine board member.

 

-dah-
 


The Emerging Photographer Fund was created and is directed by David Alan Harvey,
curated and produced
 by Anton Kusters & Diego Orlando.

 

Igor Coko – Living Behind Bars

Igor Coko

Living Behind Bars

What is happening behind bars and closed heavy iron doors of the prison cells? Is it like we used to see at the movies? Or not? Researching daily life of the prisoners at the famous  Belgrade County Jail, you can meet and feel energy of the other dimension. Where the piece of sky above the backyard is the only freedom prisoners can see. For a long time. I was making this story almost three years together in cooperation with Belgrade County Jail Treatment service, as a regular activity in the treatment of the prisoners through art…. Belgrade County Jail is the biggest of that type at the Balkans, located couple of miles from Belgrade downtown. Jail include prison section with 300 inmates serving their sentences for various type of crimes. I was making my story at the restricted cell block called “5-1”, were prisoners are locked for 22 hours including two hours they can spend at the fresh air. This story is the first in the history of Serbian photography that showcase prison life without censored details, identities… Real life behind bars, as it is.

 

 

 

 

Bio

Igor Čoko was born in Knin, Croatia in 1975.  He holds a degree in Ethnology and Anthropology. In his role of visual anthropologist, he uses his camera to capture and explore the sensibility of the street life, its people and life of stigmatized social groups. He is a editor in chief at the Grain photo magazine that showcase street and documentary photography. His photographs are published in leading magazines and newspapers from former Yugoslavia states and Europe, and thematic street photography e magazines and websites around Globe. He exhibited his work in Serbia, Croatia, Macedonia, Italy, Greece, USA, Spain, Portugal, France and Romania. He lives and works in Belgrade, Serbia

 

Related Links

Igor Coko

Álvaro Aponte-Centeno – Loíza

Álvaro Aponte-Centeno

Loiza after Maria

The strong, penetrating sound of a whistle created by the wind entering the windows of the shelter would never leave my head. It will forever stay in my ears. The streets became rivers. I have lived in Puerto Rico my whole life and I have lived through other strong hurricanes that hit Puerto Rico during my lifetime, but I had never seen anything like Maria. 

Loíza, a coastal town in Puerto Rico, where 298 houses were totally destroyed, and it is estimated that Hurricane Maria, the strongest hurricane in the last 100 years to hit Puerto Rico, affected an estimated one thousand homes.

Houses were suddenly flooded with water because of heavy rains and the raging, overflowing rivers. Wooden houses were totally destroyed. Huge lines formed, taking six hours to buy 20 dollars of gasoline, frustrated attempts to get water, the lack of communication because the majority of the cellular antennas fell and the collapse of the whole electric power service in the country brought Puerto Rico the world’s attention.

The sun begins to beat down hard on the exposed skin, while some of the inhabitants of this town enter their roofless houses. The sheets from a baby’s crib flutter in between pieces of glass from a door that exploded, books everywhere, walls streaked with mud, people with watery eyes, but smiling. These are some of the descriptions of what life is now like in the town of Loíza. Founded by “cimarrones” (African slaves and descendants of escaped African slaves), it is one of the 78 municipalities of Puerto Rico; it is one of the poorest towns with the largest black population and a high crime rate.

As I walked through the flooded streets I felt something on the floor, then I realized that there were electric wires lying on the floor covered by rainwater that is now mixed with black sewage. The only vehicles that can pass through the streets are pick-ups and high buses, or you can walk with boots to avoid cutting yourself with debris from the hurricane.

The lack of oxygen for those who have respiratory problems, the lack of medicines and the lack of professional medical services is the current living situation of patients bedridden in Loíza’s shelters.

Between leafless trees and large deforestation, a group of children in Los Richard neighborhood stop me and ask me to photograph them. I tell them to keep playing, so they continue passing a ball to each other, full of energy and happiness without any apparent worries.

Some people stop in the middle of a river, the Rio Grande de Loíza, with the hope of getting a phone signal so that they can call their relatives to let them know they are alive.

After the hurricane, peace does not reign, problems begin to bloom and the discomfort increases. Not having any clothes to change, sleeping in a space that is not your home (if you’re lucky), and if the mosquitoes let you sleep, because there is no fan that can somewhat protect you from the them, then having to lay awake thinking that at any moment downpour could fall, as is the norm in the tropics, and soak your house roofless again.

This is how they now exist. When everyone knows that they are people who feel, drink, starve and smile, nonetheless.

Bio

Álvaro Aponte-Centeno has a variety of formal trainings as an artist, including music education at the Conservatory of Music of Puerto Rico, film theory and communication courses at the University of Puerto Rico.

He has taken masters courses in cinema at Escuela Internacional de Cine y TV de San Antonio de los Baños, Cuba, as well as having taken masters courses in Puerto Rican and Caribbean history and literature at the Center for Advanced Studies of Puerto Rico and the Caribbean. He began his career making television documentaries for the Puerto Rican public television channel, in which he served as editor, cinematographer and director.

He has received the Best National Director award and Best Short Film award 3 times at the Puerto Rico International Short Film Festival.

Recently he has begun to explore photography as a language, and has been privileged to have the Magnum photographer David Alan Harvey, as a mentor. Right now, he is developing different photographic projects in the style of documentary photography.

 

Nazar Furyk – Province

Nazar Furyk

Province

This series is about the everyday life of young people in the province, about a way of everyday life where life drugs and alcohol are present, about the days that go unnoticed and they aren’t really any different, whether it is a weekday or a regular working day. I’ve started taking pictures quite a long time ago. And I can’t say why and how, I do not know, just at some point, I realized that the moments, which at first glance are quite ordinary for someone, are really important and unusual for me. Such a usual life, one just needs to cover, because it can be interesting for others. I do not know if the viewer needs to see these photos. Sometimes it seems to me that no – they’re too personal because I’m not a third-party viewer, because I’m also part of this everyday life.​

 

 

 

 

Bio

Nazar was born in Kolomyia. He graduated from the Kiev College of Construction, Architecture and Design with a degree in architecture and the Siauliai College in Lithuania with a degree in construction. As a photojournalist works with Ukrainian and foreign agencies. Nazar lives in Kiev, Ukraine

 

 

Related Links

Nazar Furyk

Sarah Lowie – Sixmille

Sarah Lowie

Sixmille

Sixmille is the post code of Charleroi. An ancient industrial city in Belgium, called “The black city”. Formerly covered in coal dust, Charleroi is particular, strange, awkward. A small town where almost everybody knows each other. And here I am, coming from the outside. Discovering a fascinating world, a universe completely different than what I used to know. They let me come, knowing I was a photographer. I came back the next weekend, and the weekend after that… Then every time I could. I started to live with them. To follow their routine, to enter in their privacy. And their daily life. It became mine. I became one of them. They became my family. A world made of parties, lies, laughs, weed, troubles, excitements, manipulations, betrayals, dreams and derision, alcohol… A world build around the present moment. We were enjoying life, fully. An african mentality on the european territory. An way more authentic world then the one I knew before. Intense. The one that awakens instincts. The one that shows what adrenaline really is. A world that challenges everything.Reality. No. Your reality. A love story is born there. Between me and one of them. Django. Immersed and overwhelmed by so many things… Let me introduce you the rapper group, Madil City Gang.

 

 

 

 

Bio

Sarah Lowie studied Photography, screenprinting and engraving at 75 in Brussels, Belgium and during her last year she SIXMILLE. In June 2016, she exhibited for the first time SIXMILLE in Contretype. The work has also been showed in “Boutographies” in Montpellier.

 

Related Links

Sarah Lowie

Caleb Stein – Down by the Hudson

Caleb Stein

Down by the Hudson

‘Down by the Hudson’ is an ongoing project, a record of Caleb’s walks and interactions – mostly along a 3-mile strip of Main Street – in Poughkeepsie, NY. Poughkeepsie is a small city – population around 32,736. Approximately 19% live below the poverty line. Recent years have brought a great deal of economic hardship to this lively, character-filled place. Some people attribute this to the downsizing of IBM’s local headquarters. Others say that fault lies with the Poughkeepsie Galleria Mall, or the additions to the highway system, both of which have de-emphasized the role of Main Street. Some blame local colleges – Vassar, Marist, the Culinary Institute – for their lack of engagement with the community. In any case, Poughkeepsie is still a beautiful, resilient city with beautiful, interesting people. Lots to learn from them, no question about it.

 

 

Bio

Caleb Stein, (b.1994) graduated from Vassar College in 2017 with a degree in art history. He has interned at Christie’s Auction House and for Magnum photographer Bruce Gilden (2015-2017). He continues to run Gilden’s Instagram and is currently in pre-production on a documentary on Gilden. His work has been featured in Hamburger Eyes, The Heavy Collective, LensCulture, and Creative Quarterly and has been exhibited in group shows in Portland and Los Angeles. He lives in Poughkeepsie, NY with his partner.

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Caleb Stein

 

 

Niki Boon – Wild and Free

Niki Boon

Wild and Free

Grew up on a farm in rural New Zealand, with a childhood barefoot, wild and free. In part my photographic work pulls from my childhood freedoms and adventures that still exist so strongly in my mind. Today we live on a small block of land where I strive to replicate this childhood for my children… it is here in our wild and wonderful surroundings that I endeavor to tell their story .. Life as it is.

 

 

Bio

Niki Boon is a previously trained physiotherapist turned photographer and mother of four wild and free children living in Marlborough, New Zealand. Boon’s current project was born form the desire to document her family’s days as they pursue an alternative education and lifestyle with their children in a rural environment.

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Niki Boon

Michalis Poulas – Infinite Perimeter

Michalis Poulas

Infinite Perimeter

The place where one draws breath and calls one’s home; ’tis whence one begins; The place one recalls and reminisces, be it in a positive or negative light, years down the line, even if one never left it, either physically or mentally; It exists as place, as time, as a past experience in one’s memory and imagination; ’tis the remains of this theme that jointly shape the way one feels; The spacetime one calls one’s home is under tremendous pressure, and the issue is with whom, why, and to what extent one is willing to share it.

Infinite Perimeter is a project about human identity as it exists within the current stage of capitalism. It is about the feelings of loss, loneliness and isolation that everyone can experience whether as actual immigrants or even into their homeland. It is about the sense of being exiled even from ourselves.

 

 

 

 

Bio

Michalis was born in Athens Greece in 1978. His father, a professional sailor, opened a one hour process film shop back in 1988 in Crete island as he tried to stay close to his family and that was his first contact with photography. Poulas studied at Leica Academy in Athens. Since 2003 he established and has been running his own photo-lab in Sitia, Crete where he lives. Photography was one of his strongest weapons against his drug addiction and he would make pictures in order to ease the pain and fear of death.

 

 

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Michalis Poulas