Robert Clark – Evolution

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Robert Clark

Evolution

The word Evolution jumps out at us, it scares and divides us. I see it
as something that unites us.
Natural Selection is the mechanism that drives evolution, and the
evidence is everywhere; it surrounds us. I see it in the beautiful
fossils that I first saw in my youth in Western Kansas and in the
stare of a beautifully colored cassowary with its keratin crown. I
have become mesmerized by this connection that unites all.

The keen eye of science that helps in the understanding of the the
structure of our DNA, the building blocks of life, that Watson and
Crick showed us. The evidence lead from the fossils frozen in the past
to the million different kinds of beetles, some that are known to
occur in the sea and in the frozen polar regions. I needed to see the
connection that surrounds us every day and yet goes unnoticed by the
vast majority of the world’s population. Questions started to come:
Where was the largest forest in the world in the past?. The answer:
Saudi Arabia.That oil didn’t make itself. Why do South America and
Africa fit together like puzzle pieces from a child’s map? Because
they were connected at one time. Why do Bonobos and modern humans,
with the obvious differences, share over 99% of the same DNA? Because
we are cousins.
I do not pretend to answer any questions on the subject of Evolution,
but I think that the diversity and the beauty can cause one to stop
and take in the astonishing world we share.

 

 

Bio

Robert Clark is a freelance photographer based in New York City, working with the world’s leading magazines, publishers and cutting edge advertising campaigns, as well as the author of four monographs: Evolution A Visual Record, Feathers Displays of Brilliant Plumage, First Down Houston A Year with the Houston Texans and Image America – the first photography book shot solely with a cellphone camera.

His work regularly appears in National Geographic Magazine, and it
> appeared as well in other magazines such: Time, Sports Illustrated, French
> Geo and The New York Times Magazine. During his twenty-year association with National Geographic, Clark has photographed more than 40 stories. His cover article “Was Darwin Wrong?” helped National Geographic garner a National Magazine award in 2005. Early in his career, Clark documented the lives of high school football players for the book Friday Night Lights. In 2003, the Museum of Fine Arts Houston brought Clark back to Texas to capture the first year of the new NFL team, the Houston Texans. Clark recently directed the short film “8 Seconds” as part of an advertorial campaign for Russell Athletic.

Clark lives in Brooklyn with his wife and daughter, and is the owner of Ten Ton Studio in the Brooklyn Navy Yards.

 

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Robert Clark

Instagram: @robertclarkphoto

Nadja Wohlleben – 92 – Helga’s Disappearance

Helga now rests in peace at 'Heiliger See' (Engl: Holy Lake). I released her ashes into the wind there because it was Helga's favorite place in her birth town, Potsdam, as a young woman. Potsdam, GERMANY, August 25, 2016.

Nadja Wohlleben

92 – Helga’s Disappearance

My grandmother, Helga von Randow, was 92 years old when she was diagnosed with dementia. Shortly afterwards, she was admitted into a closed medical facility as her disease had deteriorated. Five months later, Helga passed away.

Over the course of these five months, I visited Helga often, spending quality time with her and documenting her daily life. I am grateful that I got to share so much time with my gran during her final weeks, doing all the things she loved most: playing card- and dice games, listening to her favorite singer Udo Jürgens, taking her out for walks in the park and having iced coffee in an Italian cafe. As time progressed, the dreadful effects of Helga’s illness, not only on herself but the rest of the family became apparent: My mom, Nicoletta, and I were trying hard to cope with the situation, feeling incredibly powerless and paralyzed.

Holding onto my camera gave me the strength and a certain distance to face the tragic reality of her horrible disease. The moment I put my camera aside, the pain would hit me with force: There was nothing I could do to help Helga. All I could do was to be by her side, hold her hand, and helplessly watch her once so witty spirit disappear and her body wither away.

When Helga passed away in October 2015 I was heartbroken, yet I also felt relief. Relieved because she didn’t have to suffer any longer. Relieved because she still recognized Nicoletta and I until the end. I was smiling through my tears, because I knew that she was resting in peace, freed from this awful disease.

This body of work is a tribute to my grandmother, whose grace and courage never seized to amaze and inspire me.

This essay was Shortlisted for the EPF 2016

 

 

 

Bio

Nadja Wohlleben is a German documentary photographer and cultural anthropologist. A careful play of documentation and artistry, Nadja’s work focuses on concepts of femininity, power and identity. Portraying people from diverse cultural backgrounds, she documents their stories through her imagery in an authentic, intimate and aesthetic style. With a keen eye for detail, Nadja’s photography brings humanity to the foreground. Nadja holds an MA in Photojournalism from University of Westminster in London. Her work gained international recognition through photo contests such as the International Photography Awards, FotoVisura Photography Grant, or Moskow International Foto Awards.

Wohlleben is based in Berlin.

 

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Nadja Wohlleben

Claudia Heinermann – Wolfskinder

Claudia Heinermann

Wolfskinder

In the late summer of 1944 the Red Army reaches the border of East Prussia. Despite the imminent danger of a Soviet advance, Nazi authorities forbid evacuation of civilians. In October, the Russians eventually break through German lines, resulting in huge numbers of civilians starting to evacuate. Three months later, East Prussia is surrounded. 2.5 million people are desperately trying to save their lives; hundreds of thousands die. Thousands go missing trying to escape, while countless others remain behind. In both instances most of these are children. On both sides of the River Neman, they fight a battle of life and death against starvation, epidemics, bitter cold and Soviet despotism… On their own, these children struggled to survive in the forests of the Baltic countries. They were called Wolfskinder (German for ‘wolf children’). Some found shelter with Lithuanian farmers who secretly took them in and cared for them as best they could. In return, the children worked the land and looked after the livestock. Most of them were never able to attend school; even today, many cannot read or write. In general, the children were given a new identity and Lithuanian names to disguise their origins. Under these conditions they were able to escape deportation to Siberia. For decades they remained behind the Iron Curtain and were almost untraceable by relatives searching for their loved ones. Until now their fate has being unknown to the general public.

This essay was Shortlisted for the EPF 2016

 

 

 

Bio

Heinermann was born (1967) in Germany. She studied Fine Arts and Documentary Photography. She engages in long-term observational documentary projects with an emphasis on 20th century historical topics and the consequences of war. She made projects about German war graves in Russia, the Aftermath of war in Bosnia & Hercegovina, Young Bosnians in the Netherlands, Resistance Fighters, Aftermath of Genocide in Rwanda and about German war orphans (Wolfskinder) in Lithuania. Her work has been shown in several Memorials, War museum, Galleries, Photo festivals, and been published in magazines and photo books. Her book ‘Enduring Srebrenica’ was nominated for the Dutch Doc Award 2013 (best Dutch documentary photo stories) and her newest book ‘Wolfskinder A Post-War Story’ was nominated as one the 15 best photo books of 2015 in the Netherlands.

Heinermann lives and works in the Netherlands.

 

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Claudia Heinermann

Stephen Wilkes Interview

 

 

Stephen Wilkes

Day To Night

“There is no difference between Time and any of the three dimensions of Space except that our consciousness moves along it.”
―H.G. Wells, “The Time Machine” Published. 1895

Time and memory, the essence of why we photograph. Photography has historically been defined as a single moment, captured in time. Our memories are defined by these moments, illuminating our consciousness of time as we age. Years ago, I imagined changing time within a single photograph; compressing the best moments of a day and night into a single image. Photographic technology has now evolved to allow my dreams to now become reality. Day to Night. I photograph from locations and views that are part of our collective memory. Working from a fixed camera angle, I capture the fleeting moments of humanity and light as time passes. After up to 24 hours of photographing and over 1500 images taken, I select the best moments of the day and night. Using time as my guide, all these moments are then seamlessly blended into a single photograph, visualizing our conscious journey with time.

 

 

Bio

Since opening his studio in New York City in 1983, photographer Stephen Wilkes has built an unprecedented body of work and a reputation as one of America’s most iconic photographers, widely recognized for his fine art, editorial and commercial work.
His photographs are included in the collections of the George Eastman Museum, James A. Michener Art Museum, Houston Museum of Fine Arts, Dow Jones Collection, Griffin Museum of Photography, Jewish Museum of NY, Library of Congress, Snite Museum of Art, The Historic New Orleans Collection, Museum of the City of New York, 9/11 Memorial Museum and numerous private collections. His editorial work has appeared in, and on the covers of, leading publications such as the New York Times Magazine, Vanity Fair, Time, Fortune, National Geographic, Sports Illustrated, and many others.
In 1998, a one-day assignment to the south side of Ellis Island led to a 5-year photographic study of the island’s long abandoned medical wards where immigrants were detained before they could enter America. Through his photographs and video, Wilkes helped secure $6 million toward the restoration of the south side of the island.
Wilkes, who lives and maintains his studio in Westport, CT, is represented by Bryce Wolkowitz Gallery, New York; Peter Fetterman Gallery, Los Angeles; Monroe Gallery of Photography, Santa Fe; and ARTITLEDContemporary, The Netherlands.

 

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Stephen Wilkes

Marion Lallemang – The Strides and The Tempo

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Marion Lallemang

The Strides and The Tempo

‘The Stride and The Tempo’ starts with a Treasure Hunt. The project relates the story of an imaginary world living within reality, accessible under beautiful conditions. It depicts how seconds of Trance get a young photographer (or should I say Treasure Hunter) to capture the Essence hidden behind an intimate moment thanks to an alchemy of the Whole. Step by step she has to learn her fundamental dual position toward the world : respecting a great distance in order to be able to contemplate the secret beauty (in order to See), or by daring to be at the heart of things to understand them; She has to learn her significant insignificance; The treasures she captures, thanks to being created by a composed Everything, belong to anytime and anywhere; only are they expressing the eternal beautifully violent Danse of Life on a static impression. For a tree leaf could not wander without the spasmodic breath of the wind, the Apex lapses of latency and the gaps of gravity.

This essay was Shortlisted for the EPF 2016

 

 

 

Bio

Born in France, Lallemang experiments film photography since 2012. ‘The Stride and The Tempo’ is a selection of film photographs shot between 2014 and 2015. She likes to use a simple film camera and a fixed focal lens in a minimalistic approach. My approach of photography is based on a ‘one shot’ photographs with spontaneity and no post-editing on softwares. Thus all my photographs are shown as they appeared once printed. I mainly shoot intimacy and feel more comfortable to hide in order to reveal.

 

Guia Besana – Poison

Poison

Guia Besana

Poison

In the last 35 years biodiversity has declined by more than a quarter due to population growth and our consumption. Overexploitation is currently unsustainable and habitat destruction is causing decrease in species. Adding to the complexity of this problem is climate change. This is a fact and it is also a fact that this current situation in one for which one species –ours – appears to be responsible. Performed by feminine figures, POISON illustrates with a series of images the journey of my mind entering and exiting some of the themes, which represent this concern. In solitary whereabouts these women find themselves inside scenes of accomplished destruction and corruption or candidly define the inevitable consequence.

This essay was Shortlisted for the EPF 2016

 

 

 

Bio

Guia Besana, Italian self-taught photographer currently living and working in Paris. After studies in media and comunication in Italy, in 1994 she becomes photographer and moves to Paris (France). With a particular attention to women’s issues she travels in different countries and joins Anzenberger Agency in 2005 and the Gallery in 2013. Her work is regularly published in international magazines and blogs: BLINK, CNN photo blog, International New York Times, Huffington Post, Marie Claire, Vanity Fair, Le Monde, Courrier International, D di Repubblica, Esquire…Her work has been recognized by several international awards: Los Angeles LADCA, MIFA, MarieClaire Int. Award, AI AP, PWP – Professional Women Photographers, finaliste au Julia Margaret Cameron Award, finaliste au prix Leica Oskar Barnack . With her personal project Baby Blues she won the Amilcare Ponchielli Grin 2012. Her images have been exhibited in Los Angeles (US), Buenos Aires (Argentina), Italy, France, Spain and Malaysia.

 

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Guia Besana

Argus Paul – Taking to Heart

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Argus Paul

Taking to Heart

How to feel time’s presence when a king dies? Infinite moments collect, reverberating in my teeth. The back of my jaw grits closed from sadness, while the curtains of my cheeks push out an empathic smile.

It’s the same tight smile received whenever the King’s name appears here in Thailand’s capital city, Bangkok.

Yes, indeed, the eyes do tighten and see things differently when someone loved is gone. Suddenly, collective visions and experiences vibrate with absence, as if realizing a single puzzle piece is missing and perhaps irretrievably lost forever. The air seems painted in ripples. Not so much like a stone cast into a lake but rather how water curls and follows ducks or paper boats on a slow steady river; the wake of water from those who journey on it, the wake of King Bhumibol in the city’s spirit, the wake of grace, dignity and humanity in the hearts of the Thai people. I allowed the wakes to guide me. They spoke in waves of light and said: “Push past the layers behind the laundromats, mannequins, and flowers – be open and free.”  I was photographing like a kite in the wind whose line was cut loose by something stronger than myself. Thoughts of the king and his city tightened and squeezed my eyes into diamonds, showing me everything was priceless.

To Bangkok: No one truly disappears when they fall into the timeless river. They live under the surface, ready to reflect the depths of character for those who traverse it. Reach into the water and retrieve the puzzle piece – it’s not misplaced – it still remains within grasp. There is an invisible silken string that weaves the multiple facets of Bangkok’s soul together in an unbreakable net. It catches everything and nothing is truly lost. Tied together, our hearts beat immeasurably in the boundlessness of now; in the boundlessness of time’s presence.

 

 

 

Bio

Argus Paul is an emerging photographer with an MFA in Studio Arts, currently based in Seoul, South Korea. As a Korean-American who grew up in a rural area near Charlottesville, Virginia, Paul has a unique perspective of Korean identity and its relationship to both global and regional communities. His street photography seeks out and investigates the unseen, unacknowledged citizens of Seoul: cosplay groups, back-alley wrestlers, and underground drag queens. Meanwhile, by having documented the notorious Sewol Ferry Tragedy of 2014 and also the loss of a close family member, Paul has had humbling and life-changing opportunities to explore the subjects of death, grief, and loss on both an international and personal scale.

 

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Argus Paul

Aitor Lara – Baka, Guardians of the Forest.

A baka pygmie woman cooks inside her mongulu hut in the village of Ndjibot, Dja Faunal Reserve.

Lara Aitor

Baka, Guardians of the Forest

The Baka, indigenous peoples of Cameroon, are facing a serious departure from their traditional way of life due to the increasingly sedentary lifestyle that has been forced upon them for years. They were expelled from their ancestral lands, which have been turned into protected areas of the Dja Faunal Reserve and into concessions granted to transnational companies that exploit natural resources such as gold, iron and wood. However, the Baka People see themselves as the guardians of the forest.

The economic development policies of the Cameroon government have focused on mining, wood and extensive agriculture of mono-crops such as oil palm and rubber, causing the progressive disappearance of the rainforest. This has all triggered an accelerated loss of the collective identity of the Baka community, which is driving them toward alcoholism, malnutrition and the proliferation of diseases like HIV and AIDS.

Profoundly disoriented, settled at the gate of the rainforest, the Baka people are deprived of the fundamental right to property of their own land, as recognized by the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples adopted by the United Nations General Assembly in 2007.

This essay was Shortlisted for the EPF 2016

 

 

 

Bio

Spain, 1974. Based in Sevilla, Spain. Background in Philosophy. Aitor´s professional career began in 1999 upon receiving the photography award from Spanish gallerist Juana de Aizpuru, and participating in international fairs such as ARCO and ParisPhoto. In 2004, he received the Ruy de Clavijo grant from Casa Asia to carry out a project in Uzbekistan. His work has appeared in magazines such as NewsWeek, CNN, NBC, Financial Times, Ojo de Pez, Vokrug Sveta. He has published four books: Maestranza (2007),Tower of Silence (Casa Asia, 2008), Ronda Goyesca and PHotoBolsillo (La Fábrica, 2012, 2015). His photographic report about the bullring of Seville has been exhibited at the front of the FNAC building in Seville since 2009. He has received the ENDESA Grant for Art in 2013 and the PhotoEspaña Ojo de Pez Award of Human Values in 2014 for Save the Children report on Spain´s child poverty crisis. Honorable mention of UNICEF Photo of the Year 2014.

 

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Lara Aitor

Ward Long – Stranger Come Home

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Ward Long

Stranger Come Home

‘Stranger Come Home’ is about longing for steady love, how the unlived life haunts the everyday, and how a home remembers a relationship.

In the aftermath of a breakup, I sold all of my furniture, shoved my books in storage, and left the city. I ran for months on end, and I visited my parents and old friends. Staring at their front doors, living room walls, and kitchen counters, I saw signs of the settled comfort that I so desperately missed.

Homes have a way of holding on. If you live in a place long enough, your belongings say something about your hopes and your past. If you live with a partner, the shared space sings of the habits, routines, and rhythms of your relationship. When it’s over, the house remembers your old dreams. With every cup in the cupboard, every book on the shelf, it reminds you of what was and what could have been.

‘Stranger Come Home’ imagines a place where losses are recovered and everything belongs. Household still lives, backyard landscapes, and tender portraits suggest a shared lifetime of sunny afternoons. Pictures of done dishes, soft sheets, and leafy neighborhoods hover between reality and remembrance. Daydream light washes over everything, but the perfect peace can’t last. Dreams are beautiful because they are brief.

Any fantasy comes with an awareness of its inevitable, painful absence. Regrets, nostalgia, and unfulfilled desires shadow this romantic vision of home. To quote from Marilynne Robinson’s Housekeeping, “to crave and to have are as a thing and its shadow.” Things fall apart, moments only remain still in memory, and no one really knows how to make love stay. The pictures search the faces of family, bedside tabletops, and distant houses for signs of a world made whole again.

The project traces a deeply personal narrative, but by beholding everyday domestic details with tenderness, ‘Stranger Come Home’ invokes a universal longing for a place of your own, a life filled with love, and the fear you’ll never find it.

This essay was Shortlisted for the EPF 2016

 

 

 

Bio

Ward Long is a photographer based in Oakland, California.

Working in his home state and the American South, his pictures describe loss, people, and landscape with literary precision and cinematic sequencing. His photographs treat light as revelation, and blend a documentary approach with personal storytelling. Making books by hand, his work twists text, image, and craft into strands of poetic narrative.

He holds a degree in political science from Davidson College, and graduated from the Photography MFA program at the University of Hartford in 2015. Studying with Alec Soth, Mark Steinmetz, and Doug Dubois, he received both the President’s Award and the Perfect Dummy award.

He has been profiled in American Photo, and his writings and interviews have been featured on Lay Flat.

In the last eighteen months he’s lived in Durham, Jacksonville, Brooklyn, Asheville, Berkeley, Berlin, and Hamden, and he’s really hoping things will settle down soon.

 

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Ward Long

Jordi Pizarro – The Story of a Dead Horse

Jordi Pizarro

The Story of a Dead Horse

Ghoramara is the name of an Island, in Bengali language Ghoramara minds “a dead horse”. Long time ago there were Bengali tigers in the island. They say that one of them killed the horse of a British settler and that it is the discovery of the animal’s dead body what gave the place its name.

The island is located at the Sundarbans, a labyrinth of islands that spans the mouth of the Ganges delta from eastern India to Bangladesh, this area is being engulfed by the sea and are disappearing.

In only four decades Ghoramara has lost more than 75 percent of its territory. Erosion and sea rising due to climate change are responsible for such a loss. While expert look for scientific explanations, the island’s five thousand inhabitants strive to protect what is left and get prepared for the worst. It is a race against time with little tools and expertise, done more with the heart than with preparedness in an effort to save their way of life in one of the world’s ecosystems most vulnerable to climate change, recent reports warn that the island is likely to disappear within the next twelve years.

‘A Story of a Dead Horse’ sets out to capture the “human face” of climate change. To document the impact of rising sea levels and how the ever increasing number of cyclones threaten the livelihoods of farmers and fisherman, as land is eroded and, at times, entire islands sink into the sea.

This essay was Shortlisted for the EPF 2016

 

 

 

Bio

Barcelona (Spain), 1985. Pizarro is a documentary photographer currently living in New Delhi, India. He’s mostly interested in personal long-term projects. The emphasis of his work is largely focused on current social and environmental concerns that affect different communities, most of them unadvertised by the big media. Jordi’s main goal is to aid and increase awareness of issues affecting people and their environments in the world we live in. He hopes that with his photographs to contribute in some small way towards creating a critical reflection of this world. Pizarro’s work has been published in many international magazines around the world including National Geographic Proof, New York Times, Time, Sunday Times, Internazionale and Le Monde among others. Also my work received different international photography awards like; two times “Picture of the year” (POYI) in portrait and nature category or the Scholarship of Ernesto Bazan among others.

 

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Jordi Pizarro

Zoe Childerley – Dinosaur Dust

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Zoe Childerley

Dinosaur Dust

This is an intimate portrait of a peripheral and charismatic community of the high desert, struggling to find meaning and moments of grace in a hostile environment. This community is scattered around the edge of a National Park drawn by the promise of the last wilderness.

The work explores the encounters between people and nature, it is a play with light, impermanence and the faculties of seeing, embracing complex visual strategies. Working with both the black of the night and the blinding light of the day, this work investigates the narrative potential of photography in relation to its abstract capacities, bringing forth a reality that is simultaneously uncanny and unknowable. I am interested in landscape, and particularly in combining a desire to experience the ‘sublime’ with the inexplicable seduction of the abyss.

This desert community offers many the opportunity to start anew, providing a blank slate of sorts for people attracted to this fragile and contrary environment, to make a life in a merciless clime that is not nearly as empty as it looks. The nature of this human ecosystem is that of a paradox demonstrating an intensity and delicateness, isolation and accessibility, diversity and ambiguity.

Calling upon one of photography’s earliest uses—recording the vast, unexplored landscapes of the world—but of course in the American West everywhere has been conquered and exhausted, so people look to the desolate outposts and then to the heavens in search of the authentic wilderness. The images generate a powerful atmosphere and sense of place, one that is infused with the desire, uncertainty and anticipation associated with the unseen.

This essay was Shortlisted for the EPF 2016

 

 

 

Bio

Zoe Childerley is a British artist with an MA in Photography and a strong record in community projects. She is currently a Senior Lecturer at Kingston University and has been working as an artist using photography and mixed media for over 10 years. Childerley has exhibited nationally and internationally and undertaken numerous commissions and residencies. Her work explores new environments, is developed by interaction with different communities and is inspired by the discovery of everyday stories; reflecting a vision of the world concerned with identity, belonging and our relationship to the land. Zoe is interested in how the landscape shapes society, how “place” is constituted, deconstructed, augmented, discussed, experienced. Collaboration with the communities she is working in is important to her practice and she also brings drawing, audio and moving image into her work.

 

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Zoe Childerley

Nicola Lo Calzo – Cham

The Zulu parade emerged around the turn of the twentieth century and grew out of New Orleans’s African American community. Members of benevolent organizations, groups that engaged in community organizing, decided that if Mardi Gras was going to be segregated, they would begin a Krewe (a Mardi Gras club) of their own. They crowned a king, who wore a lard can atop his head and held a banana stalk as a scepter, mocking the class privilege of most white Carnival Krewes. It got launched in 1909 by black working-class men -- dock workers, wagon drivers, bartenders, hustlers, pimps . Zulu was considered an alternative to the «whites only» activities of Carnival. It began as a spoof, but gained popularity with working class and some of middle class as time passed. It was a subtle form of protest against the powers that be without crossing the line of «expected and accepted» racial behavior. There are all kinds of ways to interpret the meaning of Zulu and the notion of an African American man wearing blackface, which was typically the hallmark of the minstrel show. The most obvious of these readings is to view the use of blackface as an attempt to seize upon racist symbols and invert them as demonstrations of African American power. That African Americans choose to wear blackface demystifies racist cultural symbols and norms, robbing those symbols of some of their sting. By embracing and amplifying white stereotypes of black character, Zulu was a safe way to mock the mockers. Its clownish royalty punctured the pretensions of the ermine-bedecked white elite. The strategy made the black bourgeoise uncomfortable, however. The Civil Rights era was complicated for Zulu. What had been an important and subtle outlet for African Americans in New Orleans, open to many interpretations, suddenly was a contested ritual. Some African American observers were not happy with the use of blackface, which suggested that participants in Zulu were happily playing the fool for white New Orl

Nicola Lo Calzo

Cham 

Culture is a complex thing, especially when it is emergent from centuries of violence, oppression and bondage. The Atlantic slave trade moved millions of bodies and reordered the geographies of peoples and their customs. There are as many histories as there were individuals who lived and suffered, were bought and sold. I have waded deep into this history for my ongoing Cham project.

For five years, I have been investigating slavery’s legacy in Africa, the Caribbean, Europe and Americas. From the destruction and the uprooting imposed by the Europeans, to the conquered and deported peoples, the history of slavery is inseparable from the odyssey of Western colonialism but it it is also the history of resistance to slavery. Elements of resistance are visible in the many visual cultures and traditions.

There no longer exists clear icons or customs that are squarely of a singular experience or heritage. Over the centuries, and at different moments, descendants of slaves across the Atlantic region have won freedom, moved and settled, mixed, revived ancient traditions, and reclaimed symbols of the slavery era. Everything, visual culture included, is in constant flux. I’m interested in exploring through photography how and why these groups re-appropriate their slavery past, the ways and manners by which they are transferring this memory to the next generation, as well as its impact on modern societies.

The project Cham is made up of multiple chapters: after West Africa (TCHAMBA), French Antillas (Mas), Haiti (AYITI), Suriname & French Guyana (OBIA), Southern United States (CASTA) and Cuba (REGLA). I wish to continue the CHAM project in Colombia, notably in the coast region, where the afro-descendant community is based from the colonial time. Here I present the series CASTA, produced within a six-month research period, about the race, memory and community in the southern parts of the United States.

This essay was Shortlisted for the EPF 2016

 

 

 

Bio

Lo Calzo was born in Torino in 1979. After training in landscape architecture at Politecnico of Turin, he started my artistic endeavor in 2001. His photography is a documentary proposal, undertaken halfway between journalism and art, while focusing on postcolonial issues. Lo Calzo is interested in exploring through photography how and why minorities produce culture, counter-culture or sub-culture inside a dominant system. Most of his work is focused on minority issues and identity. The research by archives, books and meetings with anthropologists, historians and artists related to his subject is a good way to get a complex vision of it. The photographer’s reflections upon identity, race, gender, sexuality have been consistent throughout all of my photography series such as Morgante, The Promising Baby, Inside Niger. For five years, Lo Calzo has been working on a project about the legacy and memories of colonial slavery and antislavery struggles (Cham).

 

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Nicola Lo Calzo