Karl Mancini – Amores Perros

Buenos Aires, Isla Maciel. The guys smoke a joint in their favorite place in the Isla, a former dump site in the old harbor area where they often gather to isolate, spend time in solitude, talk. The place is highly contaminated by the quaint Riachuelo flowing a few inches from them. They don’t care about the risk they run for their health. They love dangers and always live to the limit risking a lot. Life does not have a very high price for so many kids who live in these conditions and it is constantly threatened. All of them at least once in life thought of committing suicide. Riachuelo is one of the most contaminated rivers in the world. Its dirty waters delimit borders and people who have their houses in its proximity live in alarming conditions.

Karl Mancini

Amores Perros

 

In Buenos Aires the dirty waters of Riachuelo delimit borders and people who have their houses in its proximity live in alarming conditions. On one side it is Capital Federal, on the other it is Avellaneda, here Buenos aires, there the Province. One of the suburbs on the river is called Isla Maciel. Amores Perros is a story of love and pain, a story of skin, street, drug, fight and violence. It is the story of some adolescents. Their stories are the stories of many Argentinean boys and girls who grow up on the streets, to whom the drug Paco has been sold since the age of eight years old because cocaine is too expensive (20 pesos is the cost of a dose of Paco, just over one euro), whose effects last about two minutes and condemn people to life of dependence and slavery, often to death.

 

 

Wrath, pain, impotence, misery not only economic are their daily lives. Everyone has inherited this situation by many factors: a family that doesn’t exist, violent, addicted or alcoholic parents, an absent government that ignores suburbs, a police often corrupt and accomplice who often comes to terms with the narcos. They have no life’s expectations. Being together is the only way to support each other, spending their days walking without rest looking for food, relieving anger in their raps, loving carnally and, at the same time, fighting like dogs.

A few minutes from the touristic and colorful barrio of la Boca (meaning due to the fact that it overlooks a stretch of Riachuelo, one of the most contaminated rivers in the world that flows into the Rio de la Plata) just taking a boat where an improvised Caronte drives you through the marsh waters to the opposite shore, it is possible to reach La Isla Maciel. It can also be reached by crossing the recently constructed Nicolas Avellaneda bridge, on both sides of which many drug dealers wait for phantoms who are looking for their goods.

La Isla was founded by Italian immigrants and port workers who dared to cross in the river and settle into what once was a swamp surrounded by the waters of Rio de la Plata, the dirty Riachuelo and the steam Maciel. Over time, a highway was constructed that cuts half the Isla delimiting two new zones, the favela of Villa Trankila and the Dock Sur with its towers and thanks to an infrastructure project over the past 10 years, Isla has lost its insular condition.

This division is now theater of conflicts, a war for territorial control made by Narcos groups. The only truce is possible on every Sunday in the football field located in the center of the Isla, where San Telmo plays, the barrio team, the team of everyone.

 

 

People who live in neighborhood like this are often labeled as criminals, discriminated, relieved of any opportunity to improve their status, to have access to structures that can help them or achieve a different job and future for themselves and their families. Abandoned people who organize themselves to not die. Here there are cases of 12-year-old’s adolescents who want to kill themselves having no life’s expectations. Being together is the only way to support each other. Some guys struggle to keep themselves from dying, others let themselves go with no chances to come back.

 

 

Bio

Karl Mancini (b.1978) is an Italian documentary photographer based out of Rome and Buenos Aires. He studied photojournalism in New York at the International Center of Photography (ICP). Since 2001 he has worked in more than 90 countries, with a particular preference for Asia and South America, as a freelance photojournalist and writer, following socio-historical and political events and focusing on issues such as gender violence (to which he is working on since 12 years), war aftermaths, minorities, human rights, migration, the tragic story of landmines. His longterm work “Ni una menos” about the feminicide and violence against women has been shortlisted at the Sony World Photography Award 2017, won the 3rd prize at the Luis Valtuena Humanitarian Photography Award, the 2nd prize at Days Japan International Photojournalism Award 2018, the 2nd prize at the Kolga Awards 2017 and was finalist at Lugano Photo Days 2017. His works have also been exhibited in USA, England, Russia, Australia, India, Japan, Italy, Greece, Spain, Switzerland and in many important international festivals, earning him several awards in many prestigious competitions. His stories have been featured in some of the most prominent magazines and newspapers from all over the world and he regularly collaborate with International NGOs and international magazines and newspapers such as Newsweek, Stern Magazine, Der Spiegel, Marie Claire, CNN, Vanity Fair, Internazionale, Amnesty International Wordt Vervolgd, El Pais, El Mundo, Io Donna, NZZ am Sonntag, Woz, il Venerdi, La Repubblica and many others. In 2014 he was selected as one of the Emerging European Talents by the online magazine LensCulture and was one of the finalists at Portfolio Italia-Fiaf. In 2015 he published his first book, ITALIANSKIJ, about the Italian community in Crimea persecuted during the Stalinian Purges.

He’s currently working on violence against women extending his long term project ‘Ni una menos’ to the other Latin American countries where the situation is alarming. The common line that sadly connect so many and different countries is gender violence in all its aspects (domestic, psychological, physical, economic, institutional, cultural, obstetrical). He strongly believes that it’s very important to give visibility and voice to victims who doesn’t have it, inspiring more of them to come forward to tell their stories and bring pressure on the governments. At the same time he’s working on an other long term “La linea invisible” about life in the suburbs of South America through the eyes of the youngsters.

Related Links

karlmancini.com

 

Ekkarat Punyatara – Black Day

Ekkarat Punyatara

Black Day

Thailand is one of the last countries in the world that most of the people still have so much love for the king. The king is the soul of the nation. I grew up in Thailand. As a Thai, I thought I had known well about the love of Thai people toward our king but not knowing well enough till the day King Bhumibol Adulyadej passed away. 

October 13, 2016 after the prime minister officially confirmed the news I quickly headed to Siriraj hospital, where the king’s body was for shooting. I got there about 8.30 pm. which was quite late. The soldiers already started removing people out of the hospital for a parade to deliver the body to Grand Palace for the funeral. I stuck in front of the gate with many people. Some people were still crying and many of them still had the crying mark on their faces. 

 

 

Time passing by but seems more and more people were coming. Some people started siting down on the street then many people followed. Some people started praying for the king then many people followed. Some people started singing a song for the king then many people followed. I asked if there is anyone know that the mourning event would happen but no one know. As a normal people I’m sure everyone knew that they won’t be able to get inside but they just wanted to be there.  I can feel at that time they didn’t even care what would happen actually they just wanted to be close by their beloved king. 

 

 

It was not just that day. It kept go on like this after the bureau placed the body at the Grand Palace for the formal funeral as well. Thousands of people everyday queuing for praying respect the king inside the Palace. And many more were sitting around the wall praying and even touching wall. The image of people touching the wall was magically moved me. I was very intrigued by the melancholy I felt and it was the feeling that made these people came so far for just touching the wall. It made me, not as a journalist but as a Thai awared that I need to document the feeling of myself and Thai people toward this important historical moment of the country. 

 

Black Day is my personal project during a year long mourning capturing the air of melancholy surrounded Thailand. It is the evidence of the emotion of Thais toward the lost of the people who is the heart of the country. It is the fiction I hope it is non-fiction.

 

Bio

Ekkarat Punyatara is a National Geographic Thailand’s photo editor and staff photographer based in Bangkok, Thailand. His photography is inspired by fascination in Thai culture that he was rooted since childhood by his conservative family. Beside worldwide assignments as an outsider, Ekkarat will be in his home country documenting and portraiting the lives of his beloved country as the sight of the insider. 

 

Related Links

David Arribas González – Scars / Cicatrices

Trabajo documental sobre el galgo en España después de la finalización de la temporada de caza.

David Arribas González

Scars / Cicatrices

[ EPF 2017 – SHORT LIST ]

Spain is one of the few countries where the hunting with greyhounds is a legal activity. What was a way of survival for the familiar core in rural areas, now (when it is not a vital activity anymore) has been reinvented and turned into a sport, preserving is practice into the traditional culture of the country.

At the ending of the hunting season, in February, the dogs that are not useful, either by injuries, lack of competivity or by the age, are abandoned or, in the worst of cases, are deleted using highly aggressive practices such as being hung.

 

Dog shelters and houses of reception try to give a dignified life to the higher quantity of this abandoned hounds, touching unfortunate conditions of overpopulation.

The spanish laws, that are not strict concerning animal rights, keep this situation going on each year.

 

Short Bio

(Spain. 1978) Arribas studied photography in Madrid from 2010 to 2015 and learnt a lot in different workshops and courses related to this branch of photography with photographers such as Antonio Heredia, Manu Brabo, Susana Giron, and Antoine d’Agata.

He continues studying self-taught photography and attending courses and seminars. At the moment, he is based in Madrid, Spain and dedicates himself to the accomplishment of photographic works of long route related to social projects and human character.

 

Related Links

 

davidarribas.com

—–

 

The Emerging Photographer Fund is supported by generous donors to the Magnum Foundation

Magnum Foundation

 

Loulou d’Aki – Down by the Water

S. on the abandoned movie set and the last rays of sun.

Loulou d’Aki

Down by the Water

[ EPF 2017 – SHORT LIST ]
The first times I went to Iran I did so to work on a personal project about Iranian youth and their aspirations as a part of a larger project I was working on across the Middle East. My subjects and I spent a lot of time together during the portrait sessions and at some point they would all ask me what I had seen of the country so far. All of them seemed to agree that I really had to go down to the Persian Gulf and visit the islands Hormuz, Qeshm, and Kish where life seemed to be relatively free in comparison to Tehran and where many young people from the mainland would try to spend some time every year. 
 
 
 
 
Iran sits on one side of the Strait of Hormuz, which connects the Persian Gulf to the Arabian sea. It’s considered the world’s most important throughway for oil – 30% of the world’s seaborne traded oil goes through the strait but despite of its natural riches, the inhabitants along the Persian Gulf are amongst the poorest in the country. 5 kilometres off the mainland, southeast of the port city Bandar Abbas, lies Hormuz, once upon a time the main port in the strait, visited by Marco Polo who praised the island where tens of thousands had settled. For centuries, the countries on both sides of the Gulf were in good relations and people travelled the region without passports. Today the population is below 10,000 and unemployment is high ever since relations with Oman soured during Mahmoud Ahmadinejad’s presidency. Before, locals would go to Oman in the morning and return at night with smuggled goods to sell in the mainland city of Bandar Abbas.
 
 
 
 
The island Qeshm, 60 kilometres away, is a free trade zone where paperless Pakistani ship builders keep up the tradition of wooden ship construction, side by side with traditional islanders and where youngsters from the mainland travel to feel a bit more free, away from the watching eye of the Islamic republic on the mainland.
 
 

Short Bio

Loulou d’Aki is a photographer, member of Agence VU’. She was born and raised on the Swedish seaside and graduated with a Master in photography at ISFCI in Rome, Italy. Since then she has lived and worked across Europe, North America, Japan and the Middle East.

As a photographer she is interested in how human beings are affected by the society in which they live, the influence of borders and the idea of freedom.

Alongside commissioned work Lou focuses on various long term projects, such as Make a Wish, a photo essay looking at how the hopes and dreams of youth in conflict zones are conditioned by society. The project recently won Cortona on the Move dummy award and will be published as a book in 2018. Lou is a Swedish Arts council grantee for a project called Mother of choice, which she is currently working on, a documentary work about self chosen single motherhood in Sweden.

Lou was a singer before she became a photographer. She speaks five languages and lives in Athens.

 

Related Links

 

dakiloulou.com

—–

 

The Emerging Photographer Fund is supported by generous donors to the Magnum Foundation

Magnum Foundation

 

Anton Polyakov & Anna Galatonova – Mahala

 

Anton Polyakov & Anna Galatonova

Mahala

In the early 1990s, when the Soviet Union was about to collapse and Moldova proclaimed its independence, one of the regions of the Moldavian Soviet Socialist Republic decided to go another way. Self-proclaimed republic of Transnistria is an approximately 200-km-long sliver of territory along the left bank of the Dniester river running between Moldova and Ukraine. For over 27 years the republic has had an indefinite status, none of the countries recognizes the transnistrian independence except Abkhazia, South Ossetia and Nagorno-Karabakh which are also unrecognized republics. During this time, the whole new generation, which identifies itself as “Transnistrians,” was raised. 

 

 

The protagonists of story are young people who live in the rural north of Transnistria. It seems at first that they have an idyllic life in the midst of rocks and hills covered in thick woods. They have a close relation to earth, nature, and farm animals, they are used to hard labor and love their native land. However, except the fact that their state is unrecognized, there is one more problem — the village is dying out. There are very few paid jobs, entertainment, or growth opportunities in their villages. That’s why at some point young people have to choose: stay in the village or leave their home to look for a better life. 

 

 

The title for story — Mahala — was borrowed from the local dialect of Moldavian. This word names an isolated part of the settlement populated by people who are generally friendly towards each other and feel that together they form a kind of a community. Our protagonists are also living their own secluded lives, are separated from the rest of the world and form a community that in the general sense is “mahala”: they have known each other their whole life, help each other with farming, celebrate holidays and grow up together.

 

 

Bio

Photographers Anton Polyakov & Anna Galatonova (both born in 1990) are among the first generation who identify themselves as “Transnistrians”. Their date of birth coincides with the date of establishment of the Republic of Transnistria, a small country between Moldova and Ukraine, that isn’t recognized anywhere. They both graduated from the Transnistrian State University, Anton – studied Geography, Anna – journalism. Currently photographers are interested in the topic of historical and cultural memory in the region in which they reside, as well as younger generation of people who were born in the unrecognized republics after the collapse of the Soviet Union: the question of their personal identification, the influence of the uncertain status of the country and what they face in their daily lives. 

 

Related Links

anton-polyakov.com

 

 

Juan Pablo Bellandi – Endless Countenances

Juan Pablo Bellandi

Endless Countenances

[ EPF 2017 – SHORT LIST ]

Countenances because the wheel of the imminent is so brutal that the “Great Picture” is sterile in front of the overwhelming human tragedy. Mothers waiting for murdered sons at the gates of overcrowded morgues under the Caribbean heat. Who find their own unhuman pain in the faces of the other mothers.
People allow themselves to go out to the street, only because they have already convinced each other long ago that death is awaiting at the next corner. And then it all becomes more believable.
Common and organized crime, narco and freak, corrupt and powerful.
Broken tiles, hands holding helmets, cocaine in a key, crack in a can.

 

 

The sound of motorcycles from military, police or gangsters are known to every one. Jump, skip, hide. Protest or throw stones, the power will shoot back with Glock or Russian made AK-47.
During the nights, gunshots are heard at the distance like the happy melody that sweetens our cities. Speed, speed, gunshot and internet.
The black boot and the red beret play the theatre of the absurd and grim, whilst the queue of hunger and death sweeps.
The violence as system
How to tell a story without a lesson but terror?
It is the dark hour of my land, Venezuela.
Aching Countenances, breaking point countenances.
Rumor has it that better hours will come, trace is the one who protests, writes and portrait.

 

 

Short Bio

Juan Pablo Bellandi was born in Mérida, Venezuela in 1990. He studied photography at the Escuela Argentina de Fotografia in Buenos Aires, majoring in photojournalism. The political situation in his homeland is the theme of his long-term projects: ‘En la Intimidad con el Levantamiento’ (Intimate with the Uprising) documents the demonstrations of Venezuelans against their government. The series was short-listed for the 2015 Ian Parry Scholarship, and was exhibited in London. In 2016, Juan Pablo was one of the 12 photographers as a finalist in the Leica Oskar Barnack Award with his work Chasing HAMPA. Additionally, he won the mentorship grant of the first masterclass organized by MeMo Agency. In 2017, he was a nominee for the Joop Swart Masterclass of World Press Photo. His work has been published by The Sunday Times Magazine, Photonews Germany, LFI, DOC!PHOTOMAGAZINE, Sueddeutsche Zeitung, and Gatopardo mx.

 

Related Links

 

@juanpablobellandi

—–

 

The Emerging Photographer Fund is supported by generous donors to the Magnum Foundation

Magnum Foundation

Patricia Morosan – Sun Stands Still

Patricia Morosan

Sun Stands Still

[ EPF 2017 – SHORT LIST ]

“Every photo is a ghost story.”

The images in the photoseries “Sun Stands Still” were shot during the years 2014-2016, while traveling through my homecountry Romania, as well as through Poland, Portugal and Germany. But the concrete places dissolve in this work and they become my own personal metaphorical space. In this space and through this images, I tell stories both of intimate encounters, as well as from a brief glance at the little stories I met along the way, which may have happened, or will still happen while passing by. And in doing so, images came along and have been found (again); as if they could arise from my memories, hunches and dreams. The images in ‘Sun Stands Still’ are therefor seen as momentary reliefs, which may be found in reality as in a dream.

 

 

Short Bio

Patricia Morosan studied Film and Art History in Bukarest and Berlin, and Photography at the Ostkreuzschule für Fotografie und Gestaltung in Berlin. After working in film production, she began to photograph and curate art exhibitions in 2014. She organized and curated the exhibition ‘DEVOUR! Social Cannibalism, Political Redefinition and Architecture’ in Berlin (Freies Museum, Lichtblick Kino) and Leipzig (KunstKraftWerk). She also curated the photo exhibition  ‘Welcome to my Dark’ in Kunstraum Bethanien/ Berlin. Since 2016, she has taught photography workshops for refugee women in Berlin. Her photos have been shown at the Lodz Fotofestival in Poland, in Berlin at Ostkreuz group exhibitions, JK Gallery, Filmrisz Gallery, Aff Gallery and Alte Feuerwache Gallery, in Leipzig in anderthalb Gallery, in Athens at TAF Metamatic, and in Bolzano at Foto Forum. Her photoseries  ‘Sun Stands Still’ was published by dienacht Publishing. She is part of the fotocollective “Temps Zero.”

 

Related Links

patriciamorosan.com

—–

 

The Emerging Photographer Fund is supported by generous donors to the Magnum Foundation

Magnum Foundation

 

Gabi Pérez – Our Mind; A Weapon

Gabi Pérez

Our Mind; A Weapon.

[ EPF 2017 – SHORT LIST ]

My father often talked about wanting to end his life. He felt trapped on Earth, in his body, but mostly in his mind—our most powerful tool and weapon. My relationship with him had always been a tough pill to swallow, but I was determined to understand his ruthless battle with bipolar disorder.

I took on the challenge of studying my father and his condition, by photographing his daily endeavors. The intimacy in which the photographs occurred, speak to my father’s generosity in sharing his life with a public audience. He, who suffered greatly from emotional instability, has gifted us the opportunity to peek into the emotions that one may face when living with and confronting a mental illness.  

During our journey, my father learned about, and introduced me to Project Semicolon; a “non-profit movement dedicated to presenting hope and love for those who are struggling with mental illness, suicide, addiction, and self-injury.” We joined the movement, and I held his hand as he got his first tattoo, a semicolon on his left arm. I have no doubt that, even on the darkest days, my father fought relentlessly for his life. However, the ending to his story was traumatic and unexpected.

Post Hurricane Maria, Puerto Rico became paralyzed for months. The government failed in its ability to help its people, and chaos dragged on for much longer than it should have. During this time, calls were on the rise at Linea PAS, Puerto Rico’s only suicide prevention hotline. This brought much attention to the island’s severe mental health crisis, which is significantly overlooked. During this same time, I noticed a major downfall in my father’s behavior due to the inaccessibility of doctors and medications, which he heavily relied on to survive. 

 

 

When I was first informed that my father was in the hospital due to burn wounds, I wondered if his injuries had been self-inflicted. I later found out that they had been caused in an unforeseen accident. While transporting a propane gas tank in his car, my father lit a cigarette, and a small gas leak caused the cabin to catch fire. Witnesses say they saw him jump out of the window crying for help, but at that point, 64% of his body had already suffered 3rd degree burns.  

 

 

I knew my father wasn’t going to make it. Not because he wasn’t strong enough to pull through, but because this would be the perfect chance for him to obtain the peace that he had long been searching for on Earth. With a broken heart, I told him to go find his freedom, and he gave himself permission to move on. 

Shortly after, with his ashes in my suitcase, I traveled to Ecuador, his favorite country in the world. I very literally carried his weight on my shoulders through a physically grueling hike to a volcanic crater in the Ecuadorian Andes. I spread his ashes overlooking the Quilotoa Lake and it was absolutely breathtaking. I have never felt more accomplished and at peace in my heart. I was given the opportunity to provide support and get to know Papa through my art, and that has been the greatest gift of all. 

 

Short Bio

Gabi Pérez-Silver was born and raised in San Juan, Puerto Rico. She lived on the island until she moved to Upstate New York to study photography. Her first experience living through the four seasons inspired her to make work about adapting and adjusting to new environments. Ever since then, she has been fascinated with documentary photography, which has become necessary for her to comprehend our world. She has dipped her toes into several creative industries in New York City, as well assisted multiple Magnum Photos photographers, as an editorial, production, and personal assistant. Gabi is currently based in Puerto Rico where she works in the film industry as a freelance photographer.

 

Related Links

 

gbiprz.com

—–

 

The Emerging Photographer Fund is supported by generous donors to the Magnum Foundation

Magnum Foundation

Ryan Casson – Deconstruction

Ryan Casson

Deconstruction

[ EPF 2017 – SHORT LIST ]

I want to believe. I want you to believe. Something. Anything. Crave it. Authenticity. The real. Feeling. To me, this is what is most important. For the absence of the real is fiction. I point the camera outward–and inward–as I frame and re-frame my reality–and yours. Choices. A coming to an understanding. This is what my deconstruction feels like. Yes, deconstruction.

 

 

Short Bio

Ryan was born in the United States in 1985. He is based in Florida and works as a lawyer and photographer. He hopes to publish in the upcoming year his first book, Deconstruction.

 

Related Links

 

ryancasson.com

—–

 

The Emerging Photographer Fund is supported by generous donors to the Magnum Foundation

Magnum Foundation

 

Tomasz Laczny – Disappearance

Tomasz Laczny

Disappearance

Artist Statement

The feeling of loss and longing are the main theme of autobiographical photobook of Tomasz Laczny who based his story on his own experiences while gradually losing the contact with his children after divorce. Tomasz Laczny guides the viewer through a dream world built of autobiographical and fictional elements. Composed with elements of joy, sadness, humor, melancholy and sometimes horror with expressionistic twist the author creates the world where questioned are issues of identity belonging and connections.

Bio

Tomasz Laczny was born in Poland, studied art, design and philosophy. In his works he deals with complex issues of identity,belonging and connection. He is interested in creating photo books mainly. He published a photobook “40” about refugee camps and conflict in Western Sahara which received honorable mention in 2016 DummyAward Kassel competition. He is currently working on his next photobook “Disappearance”. He lives and works in London.

Related Links

Tomasz Laczny

Giovanni Cocco – Burladies

Giulia Rouge, Blonde Pitbul and Black Cherry girls of the group ‘SickGirls’ on break during rehearsal at The Rock Circus Cafe, Bologna. October, 2007.

Giovanni Cocco

Burladies

Burlesque is an ancient show connected to the nineteenth-century theatre, born during the Victorian England as popular show. The beautiful women kidded the aristocracy of their age through music, dances and ironic and provoking manners. At the end of the XX° century, on the wave of vintage mode and culture, the «burlesque performers» have reinvented themselves creating a «new-burlesque», a show during which the strip-tease is only an element and not at all mandatory. As part of the show there is choreography, orchestra music, comic moments and, for the contemporary version, contamination by fetish and punk elements. 

The first time I attended a burlesque show I was attracted by colours, hairstyles, clothes with a mix of nostalgia, ironic and romanticism; but over all I was fascinated by the humor of these women who, despite living in a stereotyped society, loved showing their bodies in their rounded, full figures. And so I decided, between 2008 and 2010, to travel far and widely, aiming to absorb that experience. After years, the final result of this research work, edited during 2017, took another form as a book, “Burladies”, a powerful visual narrative portraying of the women of the saucy and vivacious world of burlesque.

 

 

 

Bio

Giovanni Cocco was born in Sulmona in 1973. His works are exposed in personal and group exhibitions and published on books and international magazines. In 1998, he started a long term project about the life of his sister Monia, disabled from birth, rewarded as runner up at the Emerging Photographer Grant of Burn Magazine – Magnum Foundation and reported from the jury of Roger Pic Prize of the Scam in Paris, which dedicated to this work an exhibition during the Mois de la Photo 2012. Moreover, with this project, he won PDN Award and received the Grant of the Reminder Photography Stronghold Gallery, rewarded by another exhibition in Tokyo. On the occasion of the show in Japan, he realized the relating book.

From 2007 to 2010 he completed Burladies, a portraits series about the women’s life of Burlesque world, with which he was selected for “Mentor” program with the international VII Agency, where he spended 2 years. The work has been published in several international magazines and joins a travelling exhibition throughout Europe, until to become a book in 2018 

From 2010 to 2012, he worked on assignment for L’Espresso magazine for the “Moving Walls” project, with the journalist Fabrizio Gatti – research about the migrants condition along Europe borders in Greece, Italy and Morocco. From 2013 he is working with the Italian writer Caterina Serra on the projects “Displacement – new town no town” and “A che ora chiude Venezia”, an analysis and an investigation between photography and writing about the transformation and homologation of historic Italian cities.

Currently he is based in Rome and represented by Arte Globale  and IlexPhoto 

The book, Burladies, is now available 

Related Links

Giovanni Cocco

Tara Wray – Too Tired for Sunshine

Tara Wray

Too Tired for Sunshine

Too Tired for Sunshine is a photobook that confronts my own struggles with depression by documenting the beauty, darkness, and absurdity of everyday life. The images were made largely in my adopted home of Vermont between 2011-now. They offer a deeply personal interpretation of the Green Mountain State, juxtaposing familiar and picturesque tropes with more surreal, sometimes disquieting, subjects.

 

 

Bio

Tara Wray (b. 1978) is an American photographer, writer, and filmmaker based in rural Vermont. She is a regular contributor to Vice, BUST Magazine, and is photo editor of the literary journal Hobart. She created and curates Some Days Just Are, a collaborative photo series pairing together photographers from around the world to tell their stories simultaneously. Her work has been featured on Vice, Archive Collective Magazine, La Presse, Lenscratch, Humble Arts Foundation, and Ain’t-Bad Magazine, among others, and is held in collections at major institutions including Yale University, University of Notre Dame, and Dartmouth College. Born and raised in Kansas, Wray graduated from NYU with a degree in documentary film. She has directed two feature length documentaries: Manhattan, Kansas (Audience Award, SXSW 2006; Film Society of Lincoln Center) and Cartoon College (Vancouver 2012).

Her photobook, Too Tired for Sunshine, will be published by Yoffy Press in Spring 2018.

Related Links

Tara Wray

João Pina – 46750

A young man rides a horse inside the Morro da Mineira in northern Rio de Janeiro while the city’s financial district can be seen in the background. July 2011.

João Pina

46750

In 2007, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil started the process of an enormous transformation process to host both the 2014 FIFA world cup, and the 2016 summer Olympic games. 
The economy was favorable, due to the surge of commodity prices which Brazil vastly produces. The country turned its eyes toward a huge investment in the sports infrastructure, while the investment in public services such has housing, health or security was minimal. 
In 2016, while the World watched the Olympics, according to the Public Safety Institute of Rio de Janeiro, homicides went up by 20% and robbery went up more then 40%. 
The question that remains in the air is: Why is the price to pay for the major sports events bringing cities to bankruptcy? 
46750 is a visual account of the last decade of the city. A grim portrait of the so-called “wonder city”, with all its contrasts and complexities. 46750 is also the number of homicides that occurred in the metropolitan area of Rio de Janeiro, an average of 13 homicides per day for the decade 2007-2016.
46750 will be João Pina’s third book and will be published on the spring of 2018. The book is currently in pre-sale
 

 

 

Bio

João Pina is a freelance photographer born in Portugal in 1980. He began working as a professional photographer at age eighteen, and graduated from the International Center of Photography’s Photojournalism and Documentary Photography program in New York in 2005. Pina’s photographs have been published in D Magazine, Days Japan, El Pais,Expresso, GEO, La Vanguardia, New York TimesNew YorkerNewsweek, Stern, Time, and Visão, among others.

His work has been exhibited at the Open Society Foundations (New York), International Center of Photography (New York), Point of View Gallery (New York), Howard Greenberg Gallery (New York), King Juan Carlos Center – NYU (New York), Canon Gallery (Tokyo), Museu de Arte Moderna (Rio de Janeiro), Museo de Arte do Rio (Rio de Janeiro), Paço das Artes (São Paulo), Centro de Fotografia (Montevideo), Museo de la Memoria y los Derechos Humanos (Santiago de Chile), Parque de la Memoria (Buenos Aires), Torreão Poente – Museu de Lisboa (Lisbon), KGaleria (Lisbon), the Portuguese Center of Photography (Porto), Visa pour L’Image (Perpignan), and Reencontres d’Arles (Arles).

In 2007, Pina published his first book, Por Teu Livre Pensamento, featuring the stories of twenty-five former Portuguese political prisoners. This project inspired an Amnesty International advertising campaign that earned him a Gold Lion Award in the 2011 Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity, and won the OSF – Moving Walls 21 in 2013. He also received the Estação Imagem grant in 2010, and was a finalist for the Henri Nannen and Care awards in 2011, and the Alexandra Boulat Grant in 2009.

In 2014, he finished his longest personal project, documenting the remants of Operation Condor, a large-scale secret military operation to eliminate political opposition to the military dictatorships in South America during the 1970s, resulting in his second book CONDOR.

His third book 46750, to be published on the spring of 2018, will focus on the ongoing urban violence in Rio de Janeiro and the city’s transformation over the past decade while preparing for the 2014 FIFA World Cup and the 2016 Olympic Games.

He is a faculty member of the International Center of Photography in New York, and a regular lecturer and teacher of photography workshops.

 Currently he is a Nieman Fellow at Harvard University for 2017/2018.

Related Links

Joao Pina

Caleb Stein – Down by the Hudson

Caleb Stein

Down by the Hudson

[ EPF 2017 – FUJIFILM / YOUNG TALENT WINNER ]

 

“Down by the Hudson” is an ongoing project, a record of my walks and interactions, mostly along a 3-mile strip of Main Street, in Poughkeepsie, NY. Poughkeepsie is a small city, population around 32,736. Approximately 19% live below the poverty line. 

 

 

Recent years have brought a great deal of economic hardship to this lively, character-filled place. Some people attribute this to the downsizing of IBM’s local headquarters. Others say that fault lies with the Poughkeepsie Galleria Mall, or the additions to the highway system, both of which have de-emphasized the role of Main Street. Some blame local colleges Vassar, Marist, the Culinary Institute for their lack of engagement with the community. In any case, Poughkeepsie is still a beautiful, resilient city with beautiful, interesting people. Lots to learn from them, no question about it.

 

 

I plan to continue documenting my interactions with Poughkeepsie and its communities for the next 12 months. I’m working as a busser at a local restaurant to pay my bills, but – as is the case for lots of young people with a passion for art and photography – money is tight and the amount of hours that I can devote to this project are unfortunately not as many as I would like or hope for. The Emerging Photographer Fund grant would be an amazing opportunity to devote more time to developing this project, which one day I’d love to make into a book.

 

 

Short Bio

Caleb Stein, (b.1994) graduated from Vassar College in 2017 with a degree in art history. He has interned at Christie’s Auction House and for Magnum photographer Bruce Gilden (2015-2017). He continues to run Gilden’s Instagram and is currently in pre-production on a documentary on Gilden. His work has been featured in Hamburger Eyes, The Heavy Collective, Burn Magazine, LensCulture, and Creative Quarterly and has been exhibited in group shows in Portland and Los Angeles. He lives in Poughkeepsie, NY with his partner.

 

Related Links

 

http://caleb-stein.squarespace.com

—–

 

The Emerging Photographer Fund is supported by generous donors to the Magnum Foundation

Magnum Foundation

Karim El Maktafi – Hayati

Karim El Maktafi

Hayati

[ EPF 2017 – YOUNG TALENT AWARD / FUJIFILM FINALIST ]

 

Hayati (“my life” in Arabic) is a visual journal realized exclusively with a smartphone. Hayati reflects on my identity as a second-generation Italian. Son of immigrants, born and raised in Italy, balance between two realities that at first sight might seem incompatible. To produce this story, I became both its subject and its object. I was born in Desenzano del Garda, a village near Brescia, Italy, from Moroccan parents. Growing up between two worlds forced me to sharpen my gaze and to compare these perspectives which often diverge from each other.

 

 

Embracing a single identity is not easy; feeling out of place or like an odd cultural hybrid often happens. Yet, while trying to define this identity, one understands the privilege of “standing on a doorstep” at the edge of two environments. One can decide who to be, where to belong, or to create new ties, while keeping alive the experiences learnt along the path. One must learn to juggle multiple languages, cultural taboos, references, prohibitions, and learn to teach those who are not also standing on the doorstep. I had to travel inside my own life and family. I faced doubts, hesitations and afterthoughts, but I realized an honest portrait of how I have lived until today.

 

 

The most interesting aspect of this story – of my story – is the creation of a less restricted reality. One that is undefined, in which various beliefs and experiences thrive and form a unique harmony. Hayati was made between Italy and Morocco during a year-long scholarship at Fabrica, Benetton Group?s communication research centre based in Treviso, Italy.

 

 

Short Bio

Karim El Maktafi is an Italian-Moroccan photographer born in Desenzano del Garda (IT) in 1992. In 2013 he graduated from the Italian Institute of Photography in Milan. He has collaborated with several photographers in various fields: commercial, fashion, editorial production and major advertising campaigns. His photographic research explores the concept of identity through through documentary methods and portraiture. His work has been presented in exhibitions at the Brescia Photo Festival, the Festival of Ethical Photography, Fotografia Europea, Fotoleggendo, Area35 Art Gallery in Milan and YES Collective in Auckland, and has been featured in magazines such as Internazionale, Vice, Topic stories, Playboy Italia, C-41 and Spam, among others. He has also received the Alessandro Voglino Young Talent Prize at the FRAME Foto Festival. Between 2016 and 2017, during his residency at Fabrica, Karim realized the project “Hayati”.

 

Related Links

 

karimelmaktafi.com

—–

 

The Emerging Photographer Fund is supported by generous donors to the Magnum Foundation

Magnum Foundation

Alexey Shlyk – The Appleseed Necklace

Alexey Shlyk

The Appleseed Necklace

[ EPF 2017 – FINALIST ]

Every time I think of my country (Belarus), I am reminded of how wonderfully resourceful and creative the people are. Probably those qualities were inherited – together with tolerance – from the Soviet period. As I was born in 1986, I was a citizen of the Soviet Union for part of my early childhood and I still remember my passport with the hammer and sickle on it and the empty racks in the stores.

 

 

This series is based on once predominant DIY culture in the country of my origin that developed in the time of my childhood. As I stage my photographs today, I refer to my memories and nostalgic feelings for the things that I have seen and heard in the past, events that I have participated in.

 

 

In the Appleseed Necklace I am talking about creativity, craftsmanship, diligence and typical recycling that were natural to the people living in conditions of constant shortages. It was a time when one had either to find a way to “snatch” what was needed or to make it out of the accessible materials.

Although today this lifestyle is more often seen in domestic decorations, I am trying to revive in my photographs what once was a vital necessity.

 

 

Short Bio

 

Born in 1986 in Minsk, Belarus, Shylk graduated in 2008 with honors from the Belarus State University, specializing in Mathematics. Since starting to work in Fine Arts photography in 2009, Shlyk has had solo exhibitions in Belarus (Museum of Modern Fine Art, Minsk), Russia (Russian Museum of Decorative and Applied Art, Moscow and Erarta Museum of Contemporary Art, Saint-Petersburg), China (Duloun Museum of Modern Art, Shanghai) and participated in several international photo festivals (Breda Photo 2016 in Netherlands, Format 2017 in Derby and Belfast Photo Festival the UK). In 2017 his work was shortlisted for Prix Levallois and Shlyk became a laureate of Carte Blanche at Paris Photo. He is currently enrolled in the master’s program at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts Antwerp with Bert Danckaert and Geert Goiris. Today he lives and works in Antwerp, Belgium.

 

Related Links

 

alexeyshylk.com

—–

 

The Emerging Photographer Fund is supported by generous donors to the Magnum Foundation

Magnum Foundation

Jordan Gale – It Is What It Is

Jordan Gale

It Is What It Is

[ EPF 2017 – YOUNG TALENT AWARD / FUJIFILM FINALIST ]

 

I was born in Cedar Rapids, Iowa; the only child to a single mother who since before I was born has struggled with a combination of drug abuse and poverty. When I was nine, our house was raided by the police on the suspicion that drugs were sold there. After this incident, we were forced to move and my mother attempted to overcome her addiction to methamphetamine. For several months, she slept most of the day, forcing me to partially raise myself. I always assured my mother that her addiction was never a source of shame or resentment, but this promise became more and more a lie as time went on.

 

 

My mother never quit, and in high school I acquired my own dependencies to drugs as means to escape. In retrospect, I now accept that I was angry, and wanted to be anywhere besides in my own reality. I resented my mother’s addiction and my own place in the world.

 

 

“It Is What It Is” acts as a form of therapy. An autobiographical visual diary where I confront the people and decisions of my past. I embrace the fact that my decisions were necessary in order to gain hindsight. Stagnancy and fear create a mold and some friends and family close to my heart blissfully lay in this mold forever. I was lucky; for many this cycle is never broken. By photographing the people and scenes most familiar to me I can begin to accept that these scenes are an aspect of the world. These photographs for me often stir up more questions than they provide answers for. One fact I’ve learned that I hold close is that, I’m in no way content at the moment. But, I am proud of where I’ve come from.

 

 

Short Bio

I was born and raised in Cedar Rapids, Iowa and fell in love with the art of photography in a high school darkroom class when I was sixteen. After high school I went on to receive my Associates of Arts degree from Kirkwood Community College, and am now an undergraduate student at The University of Iowa. Since arriving at The University of Iowa I have studied under photographers such as Danny Wilcox Frazier, and Jeff Rich. I aim to create intimate personal projects documenting the lives of those closest to myself still living in Cedar Rapids and neighboring communities. Photographs from my various projects have been featured in Lenscratch, Photographer?s Forum, and have been awarded by The Iowa Press Association, and The Associated Collegiate Press.

 

Related Links

 

jordangalephotos.com

—–

 

The Emerging Photographer Fund is supported by generous donors to the Magnum Foundation

Magnum Foundation

Jeroen Bocken – The Celebrated Remedy for the Cure of Disorder

Jeroen Bocken

The Celebrated Remedy for the Cure of Disorder

[ EPF 2017 – YOUNG TALENT AWARD / FUJIFILM RUNNER UP ]

 

With his interest in the glorifying and influential nature of photographs and images, Jeroen Bocken investigates the increasingly prominent role of hyper-idealised aesthetics in today’s world. Bocken is fascinated by natural science, human criteria and calculations and the limitations of the camera. He combines a variety of digital processes with natural patterns and algorithms. This experimental and associative process results in illogically constructed images. The photographer alternates these with classic documentary images, often iconic and familiar, to create an ambiguous context.

 

 

The interplay between real and constructed images requires vigilance. By playing these extreme methods off against each other, Bocken reminds us that an image never really shows the ultimate reality but is only capable of representing it. The image is a documentation, a snapshot and a notion of reality. It has the unequivocal power to steer our interpretation and perception in one direction.

 

 

New digital advances, such as 3D renders, mean that hyper-constructed images are being unleashed on the world at a dizzying rate. These immaculate, aesthetic and fabricated renderings are increasingly wrong-footing us and impacting on our perceptions. It is only with effort that we can distinguish the “picture perfect” from reality. Bocken is very intrigued by this ironic and surrealistic fact. By twisting and distorting the technical processing of his own images, and embracing the faults, Bocken explores the boundaries of our sense of reality.

Written by: Eléa De Winter

 

 

Short Bio

Jeroen Bocken (Heusden-Zolder, Belgium, 1994) lives and works in Antwerp, Belgium. Recently he graduated as a Master at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Antwerp. (2016-2017). In April 2017, he was selected with the project ‘Changing Perspective: A multi-Camera Experience’ for the ‘Braakland’ project organized by the Foto Museum in Antwerp (FoMu). After his graduation show in the ‘Extra City’ (Antwerp, Belgium), his master project was published by Sjoerd Knibbeler on the website of the German contemporary photography magazine ‘Der-Greif’. His work is also on display in the ‘Van Der Mieden Gallery’ (Antwerp, Belgium) and ‘Kunst In Huis’ (Gent, Belgium). Thanks to his selection for the .tiff-magazine of the FoMu he got the opportunity to talk and show his master project in the FoMu and in ‘De Brakke Grond’ (Amsterdam, The Netherlands). As the biggest focus for the future, Jeroen received an invitation from the BredaPhoto festival to create a solo exposition for ‘BredaPhoto 2018’.

 

Related Links

 

jeroenbocken.com

—–

 

The Emerging Photographer Fund is supported by generous donors to the Magnum Foundation

Magnum Foundation

Manon Lanjouère – Bleu Glacé

Manon Lanjouère

Bleu Glacé

[ EPF 2017 – YOUNG TALENT AWARD / FUJIFILM FINALIST ]

 

Bleu Glacé is