João Pina – 46750

A young man rides a horse inside the Morro da Mineira in northern Rio de Janeiro while the city’s financial district can be seen in the background. July 2011.

João Pina

46750

In 2007, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil started the process of an enormous transformation process to host both the 2014 FIFA world cup, and the 2016 summer Olympic games. 
The economy was favorable, due to the surge of commodity prices which Brazil vastly produces. The country turned its eyes toward a huge investment in the sports infrastructure, while the investment in public services such has housing, health or security was minimal. 
In 2016, while the World watched the Olympics, according to the Public Safety Institute of Rio de Janeiro, homicides went up by 20% and robbery went up more then 40%. 
The question that remains in the air is: Why is the price to pay for the major sports events bringing cities to bankruptcy? 
46750 is a visual account of the last decade of the city. A grim portrait of the so-called “wonder city”, with all its contrasts and complexities. 46750 is also the number of homicides that occurred in the metropolitan area of Rio de Janeiro, an average of 13 homicides per day for the decade 2007-2016.
46750 will be João Pina’s third book and will be published on the spring of 2018. The book is currently in pre-sale
 

 

 

Bio

João Pina is a freelance photographer born in Portugal in 1980. He began working as a professional photographer at age eighteen, and graduated from the International Center of Photography’s Photojournalism and Documentary Photography program in New York in 2005. Pina’s photographs have been published in D Magazine, Days Japan, El Pais,Expresso, GEO, La Vanguardia, New York TimesNew YorkerNewsweek, Stern, Time, and Visão, among others.

His work has been exhibited at the Open Society Foundations (New York), International Center of Photography (New York), Point of View Gallery (New York), Howard Greenberg Gallery (New York), King Juan Carlos Center – NYU (New York), Canon Gallery (Tokyo), Museu de Arte Moderna (Rio de Janeiro), Museo de Arte do Rio (Rio de Janeiro), Paço das Artes (São Paulo), Centro de Fotografia (Montevideo), Museo de la Memoria y los Derechos Humanos (Santiago de Chile), Parque de la Memoria (Buenos Aires), Torreão Poente – Museu de Lisboa (Lisbon), KGaleria (Lisbon), the Portuguese Center of Photography (Porto), Visa pour L’Image (Perpignan), and Reencontres d’Arles (Arles).

In 2007, Pina published his first book, Por Teu Livre Pensamento, featuring the stories of twenty-five former Portuguese political prisoners. This project inspired an Amnesty International advertising campaign that earned him a Gold Lion Award in the 2011 Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity, and won the OSF – Moving Walls 21 in 2013. He also received the Estação Imagem grant in 2010, and was a finalist for the Henri Nannen and Care awards in 2011, and the Alexandra Boulat Grant in 2009.

In 2014, he finished his longest personal project, documenting the remants of Operation Condor, a large-scale secret military operation to eliminate political opposition to the military dictatorships in South America during the 1970s, resulting in his second book CONDOR.

His third book 46750, to be published on the spring of 2018, will focus on the ongoing urban violence in Rio de Janeiro and the city’s transformation over the past decade while preparing for the 2014 FIFA World Cup and the 2016 Olympic Games.

He is a faculty member of the International Center of Photography in New York, and a regular lecturer and teacher of photography workshops.

 Currently he is a Nieman Fellow at Harvard University for 2017/2018.

Related Links

Joao Pina

Caleb Stein – Down by the Hudson

Caleb Stein

Down by the Hudson

[ EPF 2017 – FUJIFILM / YOUNG TALENT WINNER ]

 

“Down by the Hudson” is an ongoing project, a record of my walks and interactions, mostly along a 3-mile strip of Main Street, in Poughkeepsie, NY. Poughkeepsie is a small city, population around 32,736. Approximately 19% live below the poverty line. 

 

 

Recent years have brought a great deal of economic hardship to this lively, character-filled place. Some people attribute this to the downsizing of IBM’s local headquarters. Others say that fault lies with the Poughkeepsie Galleria Mall, or the additions to the highway system, both of which have de-emphasized the role of Main Street. Some blame local colleges Vassar, Marist, the Culinary Institute for their lack of engagement with the community. In any case, Poughkeepsie is still a beautiful, resilient city with beautiful, interesting people. Lots to learn from them, no question about it.

 

 

I plan to continue documenting my interactions with Poughkeepsie and its communities for the next 12 months. I’m working as a busser at a local restaurant to pay my bills, but – as is the case for lots of young people with a passion for art and photography – money is tight and the amount of hours that I can devote to this project are unfortunately not as many as I would like or hope for. The Emerging Photographer Fund grant would be an amazing opportunity to devote more time to developing this project, which one day I’d love to make into a book.

 

 

Short Bio

Caleb Stein, (b.1994) graduated from Vassar College in 2017 with a degree in art history. He has interned at Christie’s Auction House and for Magnum photographer Bruce Gilden (2015-2017). He continues to run Gilden’s Instagram and is currently in pre-production on a documentary on Gilden. His work has been featured in Hamburger Eyes, The Heavy Collective, Burn Magazine, LensCulture, and Creative Quarterly and has been exhibited in group shows in Portland and Los Angeles. He lives in Poughkeepsie, NY with his partner.

 

Related Links

 

http://caleb-stein.squarespace.com

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The Emerging Photographer Fund is supported by generous donors to the Magnum Foundation

Magnum Foundation

Karim El Maktafi – Hayati

Karim El Maktafi

Hayati

[ EPF 2017 – YOUNG TALENT AWARD / FUJIFILM FINALIST ]

 

Hayati (“my life” in Arabic) is a visual journal realized exclusively with a smartphone. Hayati reflects on my identity as a second-generation Italian. Son of immigrants, born and raised in Italy, balance between two realities that at first sight might seem incompatible. To produce this story, I became both its subject and its object. I was born in Desenzano del Garda, a village near Brescia, Italy, from Moroccan parents. Growing up between two worlds forced me to sharpen my gaze and to compare these perspectives which often diverge from each other.

 

 

Embracing a single identity is not easy; feeling out of place or like an odd cultural hybrid often happens. Yet, while trying to define this identity, one understands the privilege of “standing on a doorstep” at the edge of two environments. One can decide who to be, where to belong, or to create new ties, while keeping alive the experiences learnt along the path. One must learn to juggle multiple languages, cultural taboos, references, prohibitions, and learn to teach those who are not also standing on the doorstep. I had to travel inside my own life and family. I faced doubts, hesitations and afterthoughts, but I realized an honest portrait of how I have lived until today.

 

 

The most interesting aspect of this story – of my story – is the creation of a less restricted reality. One that is undefined, in which various beliefs and experiences thrive and form a unique harmony. Hayati was made between Italy and Morocco during a year-long scholarship at Fabrica, Benetton Group?s communication research centre based in Treviso, Italy.

 

 

Short Bio

Karim El Maktafi is an Italian-Moroccan photographer born in Desenzano del Garda (IT) in 1992. In 2013 he graduated from the Italian Institute of Photography in Milan. He has collaborated with several photographers in various fields: commercial, fashion, editorial production and major advertising campaigns. His photographic research explores the concept of identity through through documentary methods and portraiture. His work has been presented in exhibitions at the Brescia Photo Festival, the Festival of Ethical Photography, Fotografia Europea, Fotoleggendo, Area35 Art Gallery in Milan and YES Collective in Auckland, and has been featured in magazines such as Internazionale, Vice, Topic stories, Playboy Italia, C-41 and Spam, among others. He has also received the Alessandro Voglino Young Talent Prize at the FRAME Foto Festival. Between 2016 and 2017, during his residency at Fabrica, Karim realized the project “Hayati”.

 

Related Links

 

karimelmaktafi.com

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The Emerging Photographer Fund is supported by generous donors to the Magnum Foundation

Magnum Foundation

Alexey Shlyk – The Appleseed Necklace

Alexey Shlyk

The Appleseed Necklace

[ EPF 2017 – FINALIST ]

Every time I think of my country (Belarus), I am reminded of how wonderfully resourceful and creative the people are. Probably those qualities were inherited – together with tolerance – from the Soviet period. As I was born in 1986, I was a citizen of the Soviet Union for part of my early childhood and I still remember my passport with the hammer and sickle on it and the empty racks in the stores.

 

 

This series is based on once predominant DIY culture in the country of my origin that developed in the time of my childhood. As I stage my photographs today, I refer to my memories and nostalgic feelings for the things that I have seen and heard in the past, events that I have participated in.

 

 

In the Appleseed Necklace I am talking about creativity, craftsmanship, diligence and typical recycling that were natural to the people living in conditions of constant shortages. It was a time when one had either to find a way to “snatch” what was needed or to make it out of the accessible materials.

Although today this lifestyle is more often seen in domestic decorations, I am trying to revive in my photographs what once was a vital necessity.

 

 

Short Bio

 

Born in 1986 in Minsk, Belarus, Shylk graduated in 2008 with honors from the Belarus State University, specializing in Mathematics. Since starting to work in Fine Arts photography in 2009, Shlyk has had solo exhibitions in Belarus (Museum of Modern Fine Art, Minsk), Russia (Russian Museum of Decorative and Applied Art, Moscow and Erarta Museum of Contemporary Art, Saint-Petersburg), China (Duloun Museum of Modern Art, Shanghai) and participated in several international photo festivals (Breda Photo 2016 in Netherlands, Format 2017 in Derby and Belfast Photo Festival the UK). In 2017 his work was shortlisted for Prix Levallois and Shlyk became a laureate of Carte Blanche at Paris Photo. He is currently enrolled in the master’s program at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts Antwerp with Bert Danckaert and Geert Goiris. Today he lives and works in Antwerp, Belgium.

 

Related Links

 

alexeyshylk.com

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The Emerging Photographer Fund is supported by generous donors to the Magnum Foundation

Magnum Foundation

Jordan Gale – It Is What It Is

Jordan Gale

It Is What It Is

[ EPF 2017 – YOUNG TALENT AWARD / FUJIFILM FINALIST ]

 

I was born in Cedar Rapids, Iowa; the only child to a single mother who since before I was born has struggled with a combination of drug abuse and poverty. When I was nine, our house was raided by the police on the suspicion that drugs were sold there. After this incident, we were forced to move and my mother attempted to overcome her addiction to methamphetamine. For several months, she slept most of the day, forcing me to partially raise myself. I always assured my mother that her addiction was never a source of shame or resentment, but this promise became more and more a lie as time went on.

 

 

My mother never quit, and in high school I acquired my own dependencies to drugs as means to escape. In retrospect, I now accept that I was angry, and wanted to be anywhere besides in my own reality. I resented my mother’s addiction and my own place in the world.

 

 

“It Is What It Is” acts as a form of therapy. An autobiographical visual diary where I confront the people and decisions of my past. I embrace the fact that my decisions were necessary in order to gain hindsight. Stagnancy and fear create a mold and some friends and family close to my heart blissfully lay in this mold forever. I was lucky; for many this cycle is never broken. By photographing the people and scenes most familiar to me I can begin to accept that these scenes are an aspect of the world. These photographs for me often stir up more questions than they provide answers for. One fact I’ve learned that I hold close is that, I’m in no way content at the moment. But, I am proud of where I’ve come from.

 

 

Short Bio

I was born and raised in Cedar Rapids, Iowa and fell in love with the art of photography in a high school darkroom class when I was sixteen. After high school I went on to receive my Associates of Arts degree from Kirkwood Community College, and am now an undergraduate student at The University of Iowa. Since arriving at The University of Iowa I have studied under photographers such as Danny Wilcox Frazier, and Jeff Rich. I aim to create intimate personal projects documenting the lives of those closest to myself still living in Cedar Rapids and neighboring communities. Photographs from my various projects have been featured in Lenscratch, Photographer?s Forum, and have been awarded by The Iowa Press Association, and The Associated Collegiate Press.

 

Related Links

 

jordangalephotos.com

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The Emerging Photographer Fund is supported by generous donors to the Magnum Foundation

Magnum Foundation

Jeroen Bocken – The Celebrated Remedy for the Cure of Disorder

Jeroen Bocken

The Celebrated Remedy for the Cure of Disorder

[ EPF 2017 – YOUNG TALENT AWARD / FUJIFILM RUNNER UP ]

 

With his interest in the glorifying and influential nature of photographs and images, Jeroen Bocken investigates the increasingly prominent role of hyper-idealised aesthetics in today’s world. Bocken is fascinated by natural science, human criteria and calculations and the limitations of the camera. He combines a variety of digital processes with natural patterns and algorithms. This experimental and associative process results in illogically constructed images. The photographer alternates these with classic documentary images, often iconic and familiar, to create an ambiguous context.

 

 

The interplay between real and constructed images requires vigilance. By playing these extreme methods off against each other, Bocken reminds us that an image never really shows the ultimate reality but is only capable of representing it. The image is a documentation, a snapshot and a notion of reality. It has the unequivocal power to steer our interpretation and perception in one direction.

 

 

New digital advances, such as 3D renders, mean that hyper-constructed images are being unleashed on the world at a dizzying rate. These immaculate, aesthetic and fabricated renderings are increasingly wrong-footing us and impacting on our perceptions. It is only with effort that we can distinguish the “picture perfect” from reality. Bocken is very intrigued by this ironic and surrealistic fact. By twisting and distorting the technical processing of his own images, and embracing the faults, Bocken explores the boundaries of our sense of reality.

Written by: Eléa De Winter

 

 

Short Bio

Jeroen Bocken (Heusden-Zolder, Belgium, 1994) lives and works in Antwerp, Belgium. Recently he graduated as a Master at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Antwerp. (2016-2017). In April 2017, he was selected with the project ‘Changing Perspective: A multi-Camera Experience’ for the ‘Braakland’ project organized by the Foto Museum in Antwerp (FoMu). After his graduation show in the ‘Extra City’ (Antwerp, Belgium), his master project was published by Sjoerd Knibbeler on the website of the German contemporary photography magazine ‘Der-Greif’. His work is also on display in the ‘Van Der Mieden Gallery’ (Antwerp, Belgium) and ‘Kunst In Huis’ (Gent, Belgium). Thanks to his selection for the .tiff-magazine of the FoMu he got the opportunity to talk and show his master project in the FoMu and in ‘De Brakke Grond’ (Amsterdam, The Netherlands). As the biggest focus for the future, Jeroen received an invitation from the BredaPhoto festival to create a solo exposition for ‘BredaPhoto 2018’.

 

Related Links

 

jeroenbocken.com

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The Emerging Photographer Fund is supported by generous donors to the Magnum Foundation

Magnum Foundation

Manon Lanjouère – Bleu Glacé

Manon Lanjouère

Bleu Glacé

[ EPF 2017 – YOUNG TALENT AWARD / FUJIFILM FINALIST ]

 

Bleu Glacé is a cabinet of curiosity, a “scientist” study synthetically rebuilding the Icelandic landscape. The use of synthetic material is to question our daily use of plastics, resins and polymers in an exponential way, and how it can change the geological landscape of the surrounding world in a long term. If Iceland magnetizes our attention, it is essentially because of its geology.

“Those landscapes are a wonderful geological lesson, the La Redoute catalog of the volcanic and ice form,” wrote Michel Tournier in his novel, Les Météores.

 

 

Bleu Glacé is this catalog of landscapes that everybody imagines to meet in Iceland, a catalog for an immobile traveller, a lounge traveller.

 

 

The imagination makes the object we’re thinking about and desiring appears before our very eyes in order to take possession of it.

The resulting image is an interiority synthesis, rebuild in studio. The object is absent but all of its qualities are in front of us, the impression is here, as well as the characters certainly looking like human beings but who definitively are characters without any intentionality.

In those objects that I produce, everybody is free to see a waterfall, an iceberg, a plastic bag or polystyrene. The imitation is only partial, as only few components are replicated. However those components are sufficient to give the form a representative value. The concept is then appearing.

 

 

The images created this way summon and question the “primary ardour of water, wind, clouds, and sheer colours projected on the sky and the horizons” that Samivel describes in his book L’Or de l’Islande.

Bleu Glacé has for ambition to represent this mystical elsewhere, land still unknown.

 

Short Bio

Manon was born in 1993. She lives and works in Paris. After receiving an undergraduate in Art History at the Sorbonne University in Paris, she decided to dedicate herself fully into photography and joined Gobelins School of Image in 2014 from which she graduated top of her class in 2017. Through a parallele evolution among a theater in Paris, her practice of photography is characterised by directing and settings. Her work influenced by litterature is focusing to depict fictional worlds. Worlds in which she tries to understand the interraction between the landscape ant the human.

Her work bleu Glacé has been exhibited in 2017 in several festivals in France (Itinéraire des photographes voyageurs in Bordeaux, Festival la Gacilly in la Gacilly, les Rencontres d’Arles in Arles, Nuits photographiques de Pierrevert in Pierrevert, les Rencontres photographiques du 10eme in Paris) and was a finalist of the Price QPN (Nantes, France) and a finalist of the Bourse du Talent Studio.

 

Related Links

 

manonlanjouere.com

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The Emerging Photographer Fund is supported by generous donors to the Magnum Foundation

Magnum Foundation

Ian Hananto – Futile

Ian Hananto

Futile

[ EPF 2017 – YOUNG TALENT / FUJIFILM RUNNER UP ]

The project is a reflection on my question about happiness. People said that everybody needs a dream, so they could see something to pursue in life, and a dream was one of the sources of happiness. On the way pursuing their dream, some could get what they want and some could not. I did enjoy the process, but I never felt close to my dream, it always went further. It was a long run, and we needed to take a rest sometime. While we rested, we could see our friends still ran strong and passed us. We could also see that we left a lot of things behind, home and family. I started thinking, “Is it the cost for my dream?” I lost friends, not because I was bad, but they also had something to catch, and I lost my family, I left them behind for something to which I could not even get closer. Whose dream is it? Who tells me to have a dream? Why do I listen to them so much? Is it the dream I am? If only I could choose my own dream, my own happiness, would my life be better?

 

 

Short Bio

Ian Hananto (b.1992) is a photography enthusiast born and living in Solo, Indonesia. Since 2013, he has pursued photography as self-healing for his bad experiences with his past. Exploring the darkness of his life affected by his fear and failure on his own dreams in order to accept it. In 2016 he received the chance to attend Angkor Photo Workshop in Cambodia mentored by Newsha Tavakolian and Sim Chi Yin.

 

Related Links

 

ianhananto.wordpress.com

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The Emerging Photographer Fund is supported by generous donors to the Magnum Foundation

Magnum Foundation

Joel Karppanen – Finnish Pastoral

Joel Karppanen

Finnish Pastoral

[ EPF 2017 – YOUNG TALENT AWARD / FUJIFILM FINALIST ]

 

Georg Simmel wrote about the relieving power of the ruins. According to him the ruins help us to appreciate everything “incomplete, shapeless and what shatter the frames”.

Finnish Pastoral is a photo series that offers its viewers new means to indeed shatter the set up models we have for perceiving our surroundings. It is a story of the village of Karinkanta, in the region of Northern Ostrobothnia, with a population of just under 200 people: a ruin yet to come. It gives an honest look beyond romantic nationalism, into Finnish countryside and the changes it is facing in the 2010’s postindustrial era when not only the reformation of livelihood, urban-rural fusion and migration, but also disparity, externality and echo chambers keep the countryside in a constant tension.

 

 

Almost every Finn, including me, has their roots on the countryside so we tend to have a pretty black and white mental image on reality. I have followed the daily life in the village for over two years in order to redefine my relationship with countryside. Therefore the series is also a study about the modern humans yearn for the rural life.

 

 

In Karinkanta nothing but everything happens and my democratic camera captures that all timeless stagnation. The in-depth personal series consist of understated portraits, landscapes, frozen moments and details made on medium format camera.

Without any nostalgia Finnish Pastoral paints a portrait of the bygone Finnish Dream.

 

Short Bio

Joel Karppanen (b. 1993) is a self-taught Finnish artist whose photographs and videos, conversing on topics around human environment, common people and the urban-rural dichotomy, stem from the tradition of social realism. He is strongly influenced by literature and cinema. When working, he strives to find magic in moments most would describe as ordinary. In 2017 Karppanen received Young Hero / Jouko Lehtola Foundation Award for a Young Documentary Photographer. His works can be found in various public and private collections. Karppanen lives and works in Northern Finland.

 

Related Links

 

joelkarupanen.com

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The Emerging Photographer Fund is supported by generous donors to the Magnum Foundation

Magnum Foundation

Mario Wezel – Do You Sometimes Dream of America?

Mario Wezel

Do You Sometimes Dream of America?

[ EPF 2017 – FINALIST ]

 

“The cinema and TV are America’s reality.” – Jean Baudrillard

Growing up as a european in the 90’s, America was like a big brother that had already moved out of the house. His heroic stories had surpassed his absence, his emotional presence was still physically sensible. Big brother America. No matter if it was my first NBA Jersey or the McDonalds burger, that I would only be allowed to have once a year returning from a family vacation, America was always there. My view on this country has been shaped and influenced by the pop cultural exports. Movies were just as defining as books or music. The net of media imperialism has been spun for decades and is by today finely woven and impenetrable.

 

 

For this project I have travelled 20.000 miles by plane, train, car and bus within the the last two years and have visited 25 States. I had set out to portray a country who’s fiction has long exceeded its reality. I was looking for the shiny facade but couldn’t stop noticing the cracks in it.

 

 

Long before a potential candidacy of now President Trump I walked the streets that once promised great opportunities and equality but encountered nothing but an indescribable vastness, an ubiquitous amount of capitalism and a deep feeling of loneliness. Still I kept going only to realize that those cracks had even become deep ditches and that they would change the American myth forever.

 

 

Short Bio

Mario Wezel (b.1988) is a documentary photographer based in Hannover, Germany. He studied photojournalism in Germany and Denmark and has since published and exhibited several personal projects worldwide. His work has been recognized by the Ian Parry Scholarship, Sony WPA and he was named the 2014 College Photographer of the Year and one of Magnum 30 under 30. He is a co-founder of MINT Collective.

His projects are tightly connected to questions arousing from his everyday life as an average European male. He examined the idea of home and family between 2012 and 2015, in his project “1in800.” During a three month internship at National Geographic Magazine in 2015 Wezel’s love-hate to the United States resurfaced. “Do you Sometimes Dream of America?” has been on show at the GAF as well as the GoetheExil, Hannover, as a single show at the Copenhagen Photo festival and in his hometown Nürtingen as well as in a joint exhibition at Museum Hilversum, the Netherlands.

 

Related Links

 

mariowezel.com

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The Emerging Photographer Fund is supported by generous donors to the Magnum Foundation

Magnum Foundation

Neha Hirve – Full Shade / Half Sun

Neha Hirve

Full Shade / Half Sun

[ EPF 2017 – FUJIFILM / YOUNG TALENT AWARD RUNNER UP ]

 

Tamil Nadu, India. This land was a desert, once upon a time. The soil dried up and the water ran off until nothing would grow because the people had cut the trees to build their cities. Men and women journeyed here from the ends of the earth, people for whom ordinary life wasn’t enough anymore, and they planted acacia trees to shelter them from the burning sun, and built their lives together and found meaning in the world once again. The acacia covered half the soil from the sun and the thorniest plants began to grow in their shade.

 

 

Now, the jungle is a womb. The air in the tropics is like warm honey, viscous, sticky, filling the ears until the sounds of the outside world are far away. In the still light of the afternoons, hours pass like days and the trees stand sentinel.
Because every year, the summer comes, and with it, the distant memory of when there was nothing.

 

 

Blending the genres of documentary, the archive, and fine art, Full Shade / Half Sun is not so interested in journalistic fact, but attempts to bring up philosophical and existential questions of the ways in which we find meaning in the land we live on.

 

 

Short Bio

I am a long-term project photographer based in Stockholm, and interested in man’s relation to the natural environment, and the photographic archive. With a degree in filmmaking, the cinematic and the performative influence my photographic work. Recently I was the recipient of the Women Photograph Grant, have work in publications such as Tidningen ETC and National Geographic, and have participated in exhibitions in Sweden and New York.

 

Related Links

 

nehahirve.com

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The Emerging Photographer Fund is supported by generous donors to the Magnum Foundation

Magnum Foundation

Sigurður Páll Pálsson – Minds at Large

Sigurður Páll Pálsson

Minds at Large

[ EPF 2017 – YOUNG TALENT AWARD / FUJIFILM FINALIST ]

 

” …each one of us is potentially a Mind at Large.”
– Aldous Huxley; The doors of Perception.

I would like to take long expeditions visiting the last shamans and spiritual philosophers of the world. From the Shamiis of Norway to the Yogis of India, Hmongs of China to the indeginous people of Australia, Jodorowskys tarot readings to the Ayahuasqueros in Peru, the Buryat of Siberia to Jon Kabat Zinn in North America and Baekyangsa Buddhist temple in South Korea to attending a Tibetan Funeral to name a few.

 

 

Although by the documentative nature of such a project, my plan is not to portray the journey in an anonymous stand off-ish impersonal way but transparently and honestly portray and document a personal discovery rather than your average photojournalistic documentary style. Not to look at them, but to be with them.

 

What Im after is that after years of being obsessed with the surreal lying and distortion of reality in all photographs, which i still agree with, I’ve found that by creating your own world right you can reveal an absolute truth and real sincerity in your expression and the subjects through this fictional medium. And that’s what I’d like to achieve with these people; gather their teachings on life alternative to our way of thinking. An interconnectedness through all things and a deep respect of the earth. In an honest way portray these people. To learn about life.
A spiritual narrative through dream like state photos.

 

 

Scrambled with photographs, honest notes and writings, it would be presented in a “dummy” way. As if found in the jungle. To tell what happened. To photograph the unphotographable. To photograph a state of mind. To photograph life itself through the Minds at Large.

The dream would be to eventually publish the massive book which would be an art piece in itself but also I could, after every trip, perhaps contribute to Burn and ask you to publish each story on a regular basis.

 

 

Short Bio

My name is Sigurður Páll Pálsson and I am a 25 year old boy from Reykjavík, Iceland currently living in Copenhagen, Denmark. Starting skateboarding at the age of 12 and the ideology of it led me to quit school (which i hated) at the age of 17 after an offer to go skate and meet my heroes in San Francisco. The story seems irrelevant I’m sure, but it has shaped my way of living and thought beyond words and which would ultimately catapult me into the strange world of photography and passion for this project. I saw there were no limits or constructed rules to photography at all and I was free to wander, express and tear up the format as freely as I pleased. Since then Ive been doing it non-stop, publishing DIY zines, having shows, board graphics, numerous collaborations and recently graduated from the renowned Fatamorgana the Danish school of art photography.

 

Related Links

 

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The Emerging Photographer Fund is supported by generous donors to the Magnum Foundation

Magnum Foundation

Michele Palazzi – Finisterrae

Michele Palazzi

Finisterrae

[ EPF 2017 – FINALIST ]

 

“Finisterrae” means so much as: end of the road. That is more or less how it feels when moving around Southern Portugal or, more precisely, the region that in the ancient Roman era was known as “Lusitania.” The residents of this outskirt of the European Union seem to be forgotten, as if they are living at the end of the road of Europe’s prosperous past. For this project, Michele Palazzi resided in this region for a consistent amount of time in order to get a grip of the situation and to find a visual translation for it. Altogether, the landscapes and portraits are documentary by intent, be it is not so much to inform the viewer about the subject on a rational level. Instead, they hint at a more transcendent “mystique”; a specific mood as felt when traveling around the region struggling for its survival.

 

 

In a way, the people who live in this region haven’t changed that much over time. There is still an omnipresent esoteric fume that surrounds former “Lusitania,” as reflected in the minds of its inhabitants; in the myths and beliefs that are being passed from one generation to the next. Yet, they also have to deal with the harsh facts of contemporary life: The centralisation of economic power and wealth sustained by EU governments has resulted in poverty and abandonment of areas that were already disadvantaged – a process that completely destroyed social and economic structures of rural communities. Those who have been located here over centuries are now forced to leave or, alternatively, to live outside the system. As a consequence, abandoning the land of their ancestors, families are becoming disconnected from each other, and the few who decided to stay put – mainly the elderly and the poor – slowly but steadily slide down in a state of alienation. This process of social marginalisation and desertification of the soil is destructive, be is seemingly unstoppable for this bereft district.

Text: Erik Vroons

 

 

Short Bio

 

Michele Palazzi is an Italian documentary photographer. Born in Rome in 1984, he gained a masters degree in Photography at the Scuola Romana di Fotografia at 23 years old. In the beginning of his career, he worked on the project “Migrant Workers Journey,” recipient of the Project Launch Award 2011 at Center Santa Fe. Afterwards, he started working on “Black Gold Hotel,” a long-term project about the modernization impact in Mongolia, recipient of the First Prize of Environmental Photographer of the Year Award. In 2015, the project was also awarded the First Prize in the Daily Life category Stories of the World Press Photo. Afterwards, he worked on the project “Fade Away,” focusing on the Chinese migrations from rural areas to cities. He lives in Rome and is represented by Contrasto agency.

 

Related Links

 

michelepalazziphotographer.com

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The Emerging Photographer Fund is supported by generous donors to the Magnum Foundation

Magnum Foundation

Sebastian Liste – The Refuge

 

Sebastian Liste

The Refuge

[ EPF 2017 – HONORABLE MENTION ]

When I was seventeen I fell in love with Laura.

Then I met her family and the way they lived fascinated me. Twenty years ago, Laura’s parents, Anne and Ben, came to a small village in the Spanish countryside. There they began to build a house from the ruins of an abandoned stable, deep in a valley, just below a threatening ridge called “The Crag.” They built their home stone by stone, expanding it as the family grew, using rocks that fell from the mountain to construct not only the house but a corral for animals and ponds to irrigate their land. They live in perfect harmony with their environment, respecting their place in nature and altering the landscape as little as possible.

 

 

Here, I made my first photographic experiments and this place has always been where I returned after every trip documenting different social and political issues around the world.

Here I always found my family, my love and my refuge.

 

With this project I wanted to take an introspective turn into my work, documenting my immediate environment, exploring the strong relationships between love, family, and land. My objective was to make a poetic and visual map of my surroundings, recognizing fragments of memory not yet written while collecting the moments I hold close, those that make us reflect on our own lives.

Last year Laura and I became parents and we are currently building our own house for our growing family. Now, I want to develop the second chapter of this ongoing project in our own place hidden in the wild nature. I hope that with the support of this grant I will able to finish this intimate journey in form of a book, where hidden little dreams and tragedies are waiting to inspire anybody looking for their own refuge.

 

 

Short Bio

 

Sebastián Liste (Spain, 1985) is a documentary photographer and sociologist devoted to document the profound cultural changes and contemporary issues in Latin America and the Mediterranean area. In 2010, while getting his Masters degree in Documentary Photography in Barcelona, he won the Ian Parry Scholarship for his project “Urban Quilombo” and was named young editorial photographer of the year at the Lucie Awards. In 2011 Sebastián was selected for the World Press Photo Joop Swart Masterclass. In 2012 was announced as the Young Reporter of the Year at Visa pour l’Image festival. He was the recipient of the Magnum EF Grant, the Getty Editorial Grant and the Alexia Foundation Grant. He also received the Fotopres Grant in Spain to develop a project in Venezuela, and a World Press Photo prize in 2016 for his story “Citizen Journalism in Brazil’s Favelas.” He is a frequent lecturer at universities and he is currently based between Spain and Brazil. Sebastian Liste is a member of NOOR Images

 

Related Links

 

sebastianliste.com

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The Emerging Photographer Fund is supported by generous donors to the Magnum Foundation

Magnum Foundation

Lily Zoumpouli – Selinophilia

Lily Zoumpouli

Selinophilia

[ EPF 2017 – FUJIFILM / YOUNG TALENT AWARD RUNNER UP ]

 

Capturing glances of the moments that passed us by, in times when we were

maybe too young to realise that they weren’t there to stay until eternity

would have torn us apart.

But still old enough to know they were worth noticing.

The need for a way of connecting through a medium with my own feelings and surroundings became the catalyst of this works existence.

Each photograph has a background story that carries on its shoulders the reason

for its own memory.

 

 

The distance that separates us from our subject is the one that needs to be walked, in order to find the reflection of our inner selves and others

combined into one image, forming a mixture of selves.

A connection being conceived within a captivating atmosphere that was inspired by the desire of transferring into another reality, forming a duality through the final outcome of the photograph.

The intense element of nude is depicting the return to an innocent comfort of being bare naked, but mostly of being pure towards yourself and towards the observer- displaying a self and its shadows.

 

 

Every so often there are staged moments representing a personal dive within every part that belongs to a past or a present, trying to be revealed through a newborn subject so to keep on recreating itself.

An autobiographical documentary combined with allegorical aspects give a sense of spontaneity along with the subconscious, and slowly take over during the process of discovering a world out and within our own individuality.

 

 

Short Bio

She took part in the Young Greek Photographers exhibition at The Benaki Museum as part of the Athens Photo Festival 2015.In 2015 she was offered a lifelong membership to exhibit her work on LensCulture professional worldwide photographer’s website. In 2016 her photographic project entitled “Discoloration” was selected as one of the ten favourite projects for 2015 by the editors of LensCulture “Favourite Conceptual and Fine Art Photo Series from 2015.” She became part of Atonal Photography Collective and had a group exhibition in Rome, Italy on Interzone Gallery curated by Michele Corleone 06.10.2016 | 29.10.2016. Selected To Be Presented At Photo Boite |30 Under 30 Women Photographers Of 2017. Followed by a photography exhibition of all the women photographers selected works on September 30th, 2017 on The Popping Club in Rome, Italy. She was short-listed for Gomma Grant Award 2016. She has an upcoming solo exhibition at Hillsboro Fine Art Gallery at Dublin 2017 July 20th – August 19th.

 

Related Links

 

lily-z.com

 

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The Emerging Photographer Fund is supported by generous donors to the Magnum Foundation

Magnum Foundation

Mariya Kozhanova – Declared Detachment

 

 

Mariya Kozhanova

Declared Detachment

[ EPF 2017 – HONORABLE MENTION ]

 

The series “Declared Detachment” represents a generation of Russians which was born in times when well organized society and established identity fell apart. All myths and beliefs that were the driving force for generations before were destroyed. Children came into our time absolutely ideologically naked.

 

 

Now a lack of base and missing of foundation in society opened them a life which they could not trust. Forces for creating their own identity from the beginning were missing. In this moment, their society could not offer them any deserved faith, ideals or any other meaning. This young generation of Russians started to borrow it from totally different cultures.

 

Some of them declared their way through Japanese mass-culture of “cosplay” where in a simple, catchy, bright, spectacular, superficial world of anime heroes with attractive idols and colorful looks you could become any of those figures yourself. This generation escaped into a different ideology and tried to build their illusive world on the ruins of the past. But are their beliefs true enough for a new establishment or just a temporary detachment from troubles and imperfections of everyday life?

 

Short Bio

Mariya Kozhanova was born in 1986 in Kaliningrad, Russia. She is a member of the Kaliningrad Union of Photographers.

From 2007 to 2017, she exhibited with her photo projects in Russia, Lithuania, Germany, United States, Slovakia, South Korea, United Kingdom, Italy, Brazil, Japan, Denmark, and Finland. Mariya participated in the Houston FotoFest (2012) with a group exhibition of the Young Generation of Russian Photography. In the year 2013 and 2015, she was chosen for the Young Portfolio of the Kiyosato Museum of Photographic Arts. She was a World Press Joop Swart Masterclass 2016 student and 2017 she was awarded third place with her first book dummy “Two Sisters” during the Vienna Photobook Festival.

“Declared Detachment” was exhibited at the Singapore International Photography Festival (2014), at Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Photography (2014), during Kaunas Photo (2015), at a solo show during the Festival de la Luz (2016) and recently during Backlight Festival (2017).

 

Related Links

 

 

mariyakozhanova.com

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The Emerging Photographer Fund is supported by generous donors to the Magnum Foundation

Magnum Foundation

Matt Eich – I Love You, I’m Leaving

Matt Eich

I Love You, I’m Leaving

[ EPF 2017 – FINALIST ]

My introduction to photography was in childhood, as my grandmother was dying of Alzheimer’s disease. The hopelessness of her plight triggered something within me, and when my grandfather handed me a camera, making photographs became a way of stabilizing the insecurity of memory and accessing emotional resonance. If we are at risk of forgetting too much of our world, and ourselves, photography is the antidote.

I created this work during a time of general domestic unease, when my parents separated after 33 years of marriage, my siblings all experienced drastic changes in their lives and my wife, children and I moved to a new city.

The title of this series, I Love You, I’m Leaving, stems from the constant rhythm of my peripatetic life. It holds true when I leave my family to photograph strangers, and leave strangers to return home.

 

 

 

This series borrows from personal experience, and the visual language of the everyday in order to create a fictional account that mirrors my reality. Photographs are reductions, distillations, half-truths and complete fabrications. They can only describe the surface of things, while I am interested in the intangible – memory and emotional resonance.

 

 

Despite our intimacy, the people I am closest to are unknowable, and will always remain a mystery to me. I photograph with the knowledge that our place in this world is tenuous, comprised of little more than memory and story. Memory is fragile; the moments are fleeting and have to be wrestled into a permanent state.

 

 

Short Bio

Matt Eich (b. 1986) is a portrait photographer, and photographic essayist working on long-form projects about the American condition. He is a Professional Lecturer of Photography at George Washington University and lives in Charlottesville, Virginia with his wife and two daughters.

Matt’s work has been widely exhibited and received numerous grants and recognitions, including PDN’s 30 Emerging Photographers to Watch, the Joop Swart Masterclass, an Aaron Siskind Fellowship, and two Getty Images Grants for Editorial Photography. Matt’s prints are held in the permanent collections of The Portland Art Museum, the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, The New York Public Library, Chrysler Museum of Art and others.

Eich studied photojournalism at Ohio University and holds an MFA in Photography from Hartford Art School’s International Limited-Residency Program. He has published two monographs, with three book publications scheduled between 2018 and 2020.

 

Related Links

 

matteichphoto.com

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The Emerging Photographer Fund is supported by generous donors to the Magnum Foundation

Magnum Foundation

Wiktoria Wojciechowska – Sparks

Andriy, 27, astronomy graduate, picture was taken after he spent 9 months in the war zone, March 2015, Ukraine.

Wiktoria Wojciechowska

Sparks

[ EPF 2017 – HONORABLE MENTION ]

Sparks is a multi-dimensional portrait of a contemporary war in Europe, forgotten but still actual, the war in Ukraine. Ukrainians are fighting against the separatists, who are Ukrainians as well, driven by Russia’s influence and support. The core of the project is meeting victims of the war and dealing with aspects of the conflict like its influence, the impact on the environment and the lives of ordinary people, from late 2014 until 2016.

 

 

The title Sparks refers to the burning pieces of missiles that mercilessly pierce the walls of people’s homes. The light of explosions reflects in faces and memories of the victims. History is told in unconventional way using documentary photography, portraits, collages, videos and collected materials from the soldiers.

 

Portraits of young, non-professional soldiers form the backbone of the project. They went to fight in their sneakers, with weapons stolen from a museum, with all the fears and problems that any of us may encounter. They left their previous identities and occupations: philosopher, mechanic, astronomer, music DJ, bank assistant or high school students – none of them were prepared for what they were to experience. Whoever survives, is no longer the same person.

Sparks is still an ongoing project with the aim to depict next the changes which are happening in the country, consumed by war.

 

 

 

Short Bio

Photographer and Multimedia artist, Born in Lublin, Poland. Graduated from Academy of Fine Arts in Warsaw, Poland. In 2015 she became the Winner of Oskar Barnack Leica Newcomer Award and received awards for her project “Short Flashes” – portraits of drenched cyclists captured on the streets of metropolises in China. Nominated for: Joop Swart Masterclass 2016, Unseen Young Talents, Lucie Foundation Emerging Artists, Visura Grant, Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation Prize and Foam Paul Huf Award. She took part artist residencies in Iceland, China and France. Her works were presented during the solo exhibitions and international art and photo festivals, published in magazines: British Journal of Photography, L’Oeil de la photographie, Vice, Leica Fotografie International, FT Weekend Magazine, Guardian.

Her first book “Short Flashes” published by Bemojake came out in May 2016.

 

Related Links

wiktoriawojciechowska.com

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The Emerging Photographer Fund is supported by generous donors to the Magnum Foundation

Magnum Foundation

Sarah Pabst – Zukunft

My grandmother 1938, 18 years old.

Sarah Pabst

Zukunft

[ EPF 2017 – HONORABLE MENTION ]

I was still standing on a northern corner.
Moonlit winter clouds the color of the desperation of wolves.
Proof of Your existence? There is nothing but.
(Franz Wright)

Between 1933-1945 Germany and many parts of Europe were dominated by Nazism and World War II. 72 years later, the traumatic experiences of this period are still present in Europe. Memories are associated with pain, violence and threat. In Germany in particular, this legacy took the form of guilt in post-war generations, ashamed by the events and their place in history. This work is traversed by that history. My grandparents survived the war and just as many of their generation they have passed away and now their memories will soon be part of the past.

I always ask myself, what if. What if I had been born at the same time as my grandmother, what if the Waffen-SS had hanged my grandfather for running away with young Rumanian prisoners of war, what if the US-troops had arrived some hours later? Future is unpredictable, things can turn either way. What if my sister had been married to a jew not now but 80 years ago? And questions one can’t answer – Why are people capable of deporting children, men, women, entire families to their sure death?

 

 

My project is a series of questions, of a past that lives in us, of wounds we inherit from our forefathers. I heard their stories of life, suffering, hunger, guilt and death, and not only obedience but also resistance against the Nazi regime. Finally, these memories, their memories, became part of mine. Through them, I build and shape my own ones, the past, the present and thereby, also the future.

 

In September 2016 my brother died of sudden cardiac death. Suddenly, future came down on us. This project is dedicated to him.

 

Short Bio

Sarah is a German-born (1984) documentary photographer and painter based in Buenos Aires, Argentina since 2013. Besides her personal intimate work she mainly focuses on women and identity topics. Her work has been exhibited both nationally and internationally.

Her work has received international recognition being a finalist in Arles’ Voies Off, Athens Photo Festival, Organ Vida Festival, Nano Festival and the Gomma Grant, all 2017. She was nominated for the JS Masterclass twice. She was a winner of the Portfolio Revisions at FoLa and selected twice for Descubrimientos Photo España. In 2015 she won a 3rd Prize at the POY LATAM and the Canon Profifoto Grant 2014. Her work was published in California Sunday Magazine, GUP, Bloomberg, Vice, Lensculture, Le Monde Dipl., and Juxtpoz, among others.

She owns a masters degree in Fine Arts and Spanish (University of Cologne and Wuppertal, 2011) where she also worked as an adjunct lecturer from 2012-15.

 

Related Links

 

sarahpabst.com

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The Emerging Photographer Fund is supported by generous donors to the Magnum Foundation

Magnum Foundation

Antoine Bruy – Outback Mythologies

Hole, Coober Pedy, Australia.

 

Antoine Bruy was the recipient of the 2017 Emerging Photographer Fund and was granted $10,000 for this essay. Burn Magazine revolves around the EPF and it is our most important curatorial contribution to the oftentimes chaotic landscape of photography today. Most importantly, our mission is to give recognition to the finest emerging authors out there and to provide some funding to keep going and to continue making a mark.

Antoine Bruy

Outback Mythologies: The White Man’s Hole

[ EPF 2017 WINNER ]

Everything starts about hundred years, in 1915, when the New Colorado Gold Prospecting Syndicate, consisting of a Mr Jim Hutchison, his 14 years old son William and two other men had been unsuccessfully prospecting for gold out in the middle of nowhere in South Australia. The young Willie had been left in camp to look after their supplies but disobeyed orders and wandered off to search for water around the foothills of a nearby range. There was a degree of apprehension among the men when he failed to turn up after dark. But a short time later, he strode into camp with a grin on his face. Over his shoulder was slung a sugar bag full of opal. The catalyst for the existence of the future town of Coober Pedy had been discovered.

 

 

Today in Coober Pedy, the work is secluded. Climatic conditions almost unbearable. Each prospecting gives place to an uninterrupted broom of machines of all kinds and noises coming to populate the emptiness of the land. In an iterative way, men dig white mountains to draw most of the time only a few precious dust. The Australian town of opal is isolated on the edge of the red lands of the Outback. The hamlet experienced the golden age of rock mining in the 60s to 80s, when the price of diesel was cheap.