Massimo Nicolaci – I Carusi

Massimo Nicolaci

I Carusi

Sicily, for its past history and for its multiple influences and contaminations, is a place that preserves and sends forward a long tradition of faith, linked to Christianity, which has a large pagan and theatrical part connected to the populations that live there.

The man, the Sicilian, needs a hold on something extra terrain. He needs something that goes beyond everyday life. This manifests the theatricality of a people, shows its traditions and highlights its popular culture.

It is a physical manifestation, a staging, made of flesh and sweat, of cyclical rituals and appointments. Where the individual, together with his own community, detaches from the everyday, leaves his social situation and becomes something else, where he comes close to something higher, even for just a moment.

It is a great excuse to seek one’s own redemption on earth.

From 3rd to 5th of February, Catania dedicates a great celebration to the Saint, a mixture of faith and folklore. According to the tradition, when the news of the return of the Saint’s relics arrived in 1126, the bishop went out in procession through the city with bare feet and a night robe, followed by the clergy, nobles and the people. The origin of the traditional dress that devotees wear in the days of the festivities is controversial, the Sacco agatino: white coats and gloves with a black skullcap on their head. A deep-rooted popular legend is related to the fact that the citizens of Catania, awakened in the middle of the night by the sound of the bells when the relics were returned to the city, poured into the streets in a nightgown.

Other typical elements of the feast are the silver reliquary where the relics of the Saint are placed in turn on a chariot or Vara, also this one in silver.

Tied to the vehicle are two cordons of over 100 meters to which hundreds of “Devoti” cling, who untiringly pull the cart until the 6th of February. The reliquary is carried in procession preceded by the twelve candelore or “cannalori” each belonging to the corporations of the city craftsmen.

Everything happens between the wings of a crowd waving white handkerchiefs and shouting “Cittadini, cittadini, semu tutti devoti tutti”. It is considered one of the three most influential Catholic festivals worldwide.

Since many years out to Sicily, I was back in Catania, in the city where I was born, to take pictures at the sant’Agata festival.

There are many legends around this festivity, which are the “Candelore”,  the votive candles that precede the Saint in the procession.

It is said that there is a use of money from the mafia around this celebration, that the bearers use drugs to support the effort and that there are clandestine bets around that.

I had the possibility to be put, in natural way, near the butchers candelora (à cannelora ri chianchieri) arround 2011.

My intention is to narrate the human world, i Carusi (the guys), that keep moving around this big candle. Is a material ritual, bodies, fisicitys, a men’s world, that have eyes only for one woman, the lovely, Agata.

This project represents the reconnection to my origin and to the culture that I left, to then return to Sicily and try to understand some parts of me.

I found myself in everyone of them, in every single Caruso.

Short Bio

(Catania, 1989) Since 2006, he attended several workshops by Obiettivo Granieri: Lorenzo Castore (2006/2007), Michael Ackerman (2007/2008), Morten Andersen (2011). In 2008 he moved to Rome from Sicily. On 22 June 2009, one of the young photographers chosen to participate in the “First Impression” portfolio reading organized by Magnum Photos in collaboration with the Photography Gallery in London. In March of 2010 he moved to New York. At that time, built a small photographic project called NYCIt prefers the work of wide-ranging, including: Catania (since 2006), Rome (since 2008), Paris (2015 / 2017), Berlin (since 2009), New York (2010). In 2013 he photographed the Conclave with Christopher Morris (VII agency) for Time Magazine in Rome. In 2015 he is still photographer in the new film by Alessandro Comodin, “Happy time will come soon”. Since 2008 collaborates closely with Lorenzo Castore.Since 2010 collaborates with Michael Ackerman (Camera Obscura Gallery – Paris). In July 2017, he released his first book LA CERVA BIANCA – La Biche Blanche published by LUCE and Shellac Sud. Now he lives in Berlin.

Related Links

massimo nicolaci

Emerging Photographer Fund 2019 – call for submissions

 

Emerging Photographer Fund 2019

 

call for submissions

 

 

The Emerging Photographer Fund 2019 is now open for submissions!

This year we are proud to offer two awards: the Emerging Photographer Grant for $10,000 and the Fujifilm Young Talent Award (25 or under) for $10,000. For more information, follow the link below.

 

Enter here

 

The deadline for entry is June 5th, 2019 (6pm PST)

 

 

 

Burn Magazine revolves around the EPF. It is our most important curatorial contribution to the oftentimes chaotic landscape of photography today. By choosing a jury whose lifetimes have been spent in looking at photographs and making photographs, we try to give our Burn readers a distilled version of the best work of all that flows before their eyes everyday.

Most importantly our mission is to give recognition to the finest emerging authors out there and to provide some funding to at least a few to keep going and to continue making a mark. With the support of the non-profit Magnum Foundation, $10,000 is given to the recipient of EPF to move forward in their work. Our previous winners prove this is not in vain.

In addition, Fujifilm is partnering with us to offer an award, open to all photographers who are 25 or younger at the time of the deadline. All you need to do is enter into the EPF… and if you’re 25 or younger, you’ll be automatically eligible for the Fujifilm Young Talent Award. Fujifilm offers a cash prize of $10,000 to the winner.

Of course we are immensely proud of this partnership… and hope in this way we can give back to the young emerging ones amongst us… who just might need it more than we can ever imagine.

 

 

 

 

Previous EPF Winners

 

The 2008 Emerging Photographer Fund grant was awarded to Sean Gallagher for his essay on the environmental Desertification of China.

The 2009 Emerging Photographer Fund grant was awarded to Alejandro Chaskielberg for his 8×10 format essay on the Parana River Delta ‘The High Tide’.

The 2010 Emerging Photographer Fund grant was awarded to Davide Monteleone for his essay ‘Northern Caucasus’.

The 2011 Emerging Photographer Fund grant was awarded to Irina Werning for her essay ‘Back to the Future’.

In 2012 three Emerging Photographer Fund grants were awarded: one major to Matt Lutton for his essay ‘Only Unity’ and two minors to Giovanni Cocco for his essay ‘Monia’ and to Simona Ghizzoni for her essay ‘Afterdark’.

In 2013 four Emerging Photographer Fund grants were awarded: one major to Diana Markosian for her essay ‘My Father The Stranger’ and three minors to: Iveta Vaivode for her essay ‘Somewhere on Disappearing Path’, Oksana Yushko for her essay ‘Balklava: The Lost History’ and Maciej Pisuk for his essay ‘Under The Skin; Photographs From Brzeska Street’.

In 2014 two Emerging Photographer Fund grants were awarded: one major to Alessandro Penso for his essay ‘Lost Generation’ and one minor to: Birte Kaufmann for her essay ‘The Travelers’.

In 2015 the Emerging Photographer Fund was awarded to Danila Tkachenko for ‘Restricted Areas’, and the Fujifilm Young Talent Award to Sofia Valiente for ‘Miracle Village’.

In 2016 the Emerging Photographer Fund was awarded to Annie Flanagan for ‘Deafening Sound’, and the Fujifilm Young Talent Award to Aleksander Raczynski for ‘Views’

In 2017 the Emerging Photographer Fund was awarded to Antoine Bruy for ‘Outback Mythologies’, and the Fujifilm Young Talent Award to Aleksey Kondratyev for ‘Ice Fishers’

In 2018 the Emerging Photographer Fund was awarded to Shadman Shadid for ‘No Quarter’, and the Fujifilm Young Talent Award to Tabitha Barnard for ‘Cult of Womanhood’

 

Entries are now open

 

The Emerging Photographer Fund 2019 is now open for submissions!

The deadline for entry is June 5th, 2019 (6pm PST)

– Enter here –

 

 

Editor’s note:

Many thanks especially to my EPF team Anton Kusters, Diego Orlando, and Mallory Bracken. First off, they must deal with me!! Never easy. In all seriousness, they all show amazing dedication to the spirit of doing something which just feels good. To provide a platform for the up and coming.

 

Special thanks to Susan Meiselas of the Magnum Foundation. Nobody on the planet is more dedicated to allowing new talent to develop.

 

Special thanks also to Michael Loyd Young, EPF funder and BURN Magazine board member.

 

 

 

FujiFilm_Basic-Black

 

A heart felt thank you also to Fujifilm for the Fujifilm Young Talent Award… making it possible for the EPF to keep focus on the future generations, the young ones, the ones with a vision already making a mark now… and just might make another jump soon…

 

-dah-

 

The Emerging Photographer Fund was created and is directed by David Alan Harvey,
curated and produced by Anton Kusters & Diego Orlando.

Nicholas Constant (Untitled)

Nicholas Constant

(Untitled)

[ 2018 FUJIFILM / YOUNG TALENT AWARD SHORTLIST ]

My Grandmother’s father and brother were both beheaded by the Japanese during the occupation of Malaysia from 1941 to 1945 during WWII for being Chinese. This meant she had to flee the country with her mother at the age of 3. With this leaving of the country, all ties to her heritage were severed. In 2016 I went out to Malaysia to explore how atrocities have many indirect effects, including myself not feeling as having ties to Chinese or Eastern culture. From this trip I managed to find long lost family through a common ancestor and was able to fill in their family tree for them as well as add to my own. Through these connections I tried to find out as much as I could about my Grandmothers father and brother, where they would have lived and worked. Also exploring the myth that my Grandmother believes her brother is still alive. While exploring my family history I also look at the locations of atrocities and the inspection centres which led to these atrocities to contemplate wether my family would have been subject to these locations. I also look at Singapore as an important amount of the Japanese occupation was carried out there. An interesting aspect about this work is that prior to the Japanese, the British had occupied Malaysia so for me to come as a British citizen to make work here draws up interesting parallels which I am yet to explore further.

 

 

This project explores indirect effects of war on a personal scale which is something that I have not yet encountered. With my previous work I have looked at indirect effects from war and tried to keep an objective outlook on the happenings that I made work on. This work combines my examination of war with the question of identity as I have such a diverse heritage, it seems that war, like millions of others, has shaped my life without it being evident at all to me bringing me to question myself as well as the development of civilisation.

 

Short Bio

With an interest in the spectacle of modern warfare, I explore spaces in which conflict occur particularly interested in the indirect effects on war; how they surface in the everyday and how these issues are dealt with in absence of mainstream media. Using a simple, unintrusive approach to many of the projects, I attempt to make invisible subjects visible through the use of landscape and context. Photographing in a slow and quiet manor, I try to force the viewer to study the image to extract the most information they can to then be reinforced by their own contextual knowledge and personal views. Consciously realising my place as a western spectator of modern conflict issues, I try to make work which aims to resonate with the western viewer in a non-confrontational way, believing empathy is most effective when the viewer pieces the puzzle together for themselves.

 

Related Links

nicholasconstant.com

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The Fujifilm/Young Talent Award is supported by Fujifilm

 

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Mathias Depardon – Gold Rivers

Mathias Depardon

Gold Rivers

[ EPF 2018 SHORTLIST ]

The history of the Mesopotamian rivers and their presence in our own cultural history may be one of the oldest continuously inhabited settlements in the world, spanning some, 10,000 years of world heritage. In the 4th millennium BCE, the first literate societies emerged in Southern Mesopotamia, often referred to as the Cradle of Civilization. What was once considered to be the Garden of Eden is now in danger of disappearing.

The Euphrates and Tigris rivers occupy a central place in the daily life, ecology, and history of millions of people living around them. The Euphrates is the longest and one of the most historically important rivers of the Middle East flowing over 1,700 miles from eastern Turkey through Syria and Iraq.

 

 

The town of Hasankeyf in southeast Turkey is the only place in the world that has met nine out of ten criteria for Unesco’s world heritage sites. However, the Turkish government has made no effort to bid for its inclusion in the coveted world heritage list, or to promote tourism in the ancient town located along the Tigris River. Any effort to do so would harm the development of the Ilisu dam — a state project that is supposed to entirely flood Hasankeyf, along with 52 other villages and 15 nearby towns, by 2019.

Already, a number of towns and villages located on the Euphrates River have been flooded as part of Turkey’s controversial Guneydogu Anadolu Projesi — or Southeastern Anatolia Project. GAP, as it is known, is currently Ankara’s most significant territory planning project, involving eight provinces, and will irrigate 1.7 million dry hectares of earth from 22 different dams all fed by water from the Tigris and the Euphrates rivers.

 

 

 

Both residents of southeastern Turkey and international observers continue to question the Ilisu dam, which will destroy a unique historical site, where Assyrians, Roman, and Ottoman monuments exist in close proximity. Yet the Turkish government maintains that the project will aid the impoverished region, allowing the creation of 10,000 jobs and the development of local farming and agriculture.

Along with environmental and social risks, the geopolitical impact of the dam cannot be ignored either. The development of Ilisu has been severely criticized by neighboring Iraq and Syria, who accuse Turkey of appropriating waters of two rivers that connect to their territories, which are already hit by arid conditions and drought.

 

Short Bio

b. 1980 France. Mathias Depardon was raised between France, Belgium and the USA. After studying communication and journalism in Brussels, Mathias briefly joined the Belgian national newspaper Le Soir before devoting himself to reportage and feature work. His immersive process and slower approach to journalism allow for comprehensive bodies of work that reveal and frame important social, economic and political issues in territories under tension such as Turkey and Iraq where he question the idea of border and territory. Through series of portraits and landscapes, Mathias Depardon probe a Turkey torn between modernization and the reminiscence of the ottoman values evoking the notion of Pan-Turkism in the neighboring countries. In 2018 he is the finalist of the Grand Prix de la Photographie Documentaire in Sète and laureate of the Grant for Contemporary Documentary Photography (Centre National des Arts Plastiques). Exhibitions have included the Musée des Archives nationales and Arles.

 

Related Links

mathiasdepardon.com

 

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The Emerging Photographer Fund is supported by generous donors to the Magnum Foundation

Magnum Foundation

Sébastien Van Malleghem – Nordic Noir

Sébastien Van Malleghem

Nordic Noir

An artistic residence in Norway (Halsnoy Cloister, 2013) ignites a passion with the North. Iceland, then Scandinavia further fuels the flame, revealing a personal confrontation with an endless space, a passionate and brutal encounter.

Captivated by the Scandinavian lands from a residence in Norway, Sébastien Van Malleghem has since advanced his travels from Denmark to Iceland, passing through Finland and Sweden. Nordic Noir is the visual recital of this contrasting trek. With breath-taking and timeless landscapes, scenes of life and harsh portraits, the series is closer to a constellation than a linear path. In the explosion of emotions that is the series, the photographer finds the right balance between the sublime and the banal, between the grandiose and the intimate. Leaning towards reverie in this work, Sébastien Van Malleghem’s eye remains sharp and keen; just as well when the scenery lends itself to pure contemplation, to the exhilaration of large spaces, to the experience of solitude where he captures a carefree and unbridled youthfulness that lays itself unreservedly open in front of the lens.

CONVERSATION WITH DIEGO ORLANDO

Sébastien, i know for you this has been a deep personal project, a sort of “personal long love story” as you described it, so i want to know more what keeps you close to this work and how you see it after years. The way you are looking at it has changed?

No, not at all. Nordic Noir, made me look deeper. That work I started in 2012 gave me the guts to do what I love to do and to believe in it. So far, making these photographs made me extremely happy and more confident. I didn’t change my way to look at the world, that work didn’t change it either, at the opposite: it confirmed it.

And are the pictures telling new things to you after years? I mean are they showing some secondary layer you didn’t see at the time?

I don’t think so, everything became clear when I looked at the book and when we made it.  If my photographs would mean something new, it would just be my mind going in different mood looking at them, but I know their origin and what surrounds them – when I made them, why I made them, and how I presented them. Nordic Noir is a big part of my life and what’s going on in my mind when I’m looking at reality. It is presented with exactitude in the photography book « Nordic Noir » published at the end of 2017. 

Do you miss the way you were looking at world at that time?

That questions sounds like you can have a way to look at the world and then change it. As it is a style or a filter. That is totally not the case for me. Nordic Noir is exactly how I feel and sense the world that surrounds me. Yes, I love black in my photographs, yes most of my reports are about the people in the margins, yes these are important reports that deserves attention; and Nordic Noir is my own wild run. 

I can’t « miss » this way to look at the world, because it is inside my DNA. Going to the extremes, with Nordic Noir was deep honesty towards love, photography, and the main themes that I’m questioning. I can’t miss my way to look at it cause I’m still shooting there. I still need it, it became a necessary part of my life: a balance. I’ll be back in Iceland in few month, and later on in winter 2019 I have been invited to an Artist Residency in North Norway: Vesteralen. I never stopped being up there, even after the book was published I was making photographs in Norway… 

I explain my question in a different way.. sometime when a project is finished we close that chapter inside us and we start exploring different directions opening deeper level of our perceptions. Yet, after a while, sometime after years, the immediate and first way of looking and capturing moments that we had on our first big project is something that we miss because we realize we cannot replicate. 

The key is that Nordic Noir isn’t my first big project. Nordic Noir was made in parallel of my work of reporter. So when I was documenting the Mexican Morgues, or the Heroine crisis in North of France, and other reportages in EU I needed to breathe. Therefore I would head up to Scandinavia and just photograph what I was personally interested by, and confront myself to quiet places. That is why that work is personal and spread over 5 years. Because it’s not a first, and after 11 years of being a photographer I know how to close a reportage, but personal works are limitless. It just depends of your mood and feeling to continue it or end it, but in anyway it sticks to your soul.
Now I’m working on this new personal project and reportage in the USA, I evolved from Nordic Noir, and I can  do the distinction with the new project and the one still running. 
It’s a personal choice to continue something with will and desire or to start something new. 

Short Bio

His long-term projects focus on the idea of justice in contemporary Europe. For four years he followed the daily job of police officers and their interaction with the public, then he decided to enter inside Belgian prisons for more than three years from 2011 until 2014. Sébastien went in Libya in 2012 to work on the ruins of the power after the death of Kaddafi. He covered the daily life of the people living in the streets of Berlin during five months in 2013. Van Malleghem focused on the Mexican Morgues in 2017, Heroine addicts in North of France in 2018 and went back to Belgium to photograph asylums in Flanders. Next to his European reportages, Sébastien started another long-term project in 2012 focused on Scandinavia, which has been published in 2018 under the name of Nordic Noir and selected has one of the most captivating photo-book of the year by the independant magazine Mother Jones (USA)

 

Related Links

www.sebastienvanmalleghem.eu

 

Andrew Sullivan – Endangered Species

Andrew Sullivan

Endangered Species

 

Mexico’s murder rate went up 16% in the first half of 2018, a grim statistic that suggested this year would be the bloodiest in the country’s history. Time magazine approximated that someone was killed every 15 minutes in May. Where I live in Mexico has the reputation of being a safe haven. In travel around the country, I have seldom been in danger, yet I worry about personal safety. Reconciling my daily life with the headlines I see in the “prensa amarilla” leads to thoughts that I’m living in a fantastical bubble while a war rages closer than I want to believe.

 

 

While I recognize that I am not a target of the violence between rival criminal cartels, that sense of unease provided the idea for this project. I thought of looking over my shoulder on a quiet street in a strange town, and noticed Mexicans doing the same as I would pass in the street. I sensed a certain vigilance, and started to photograph scenes that seemed to signify something other than what was depicted. I didn’t want to photograph blatant violence. I wanted the photos themselves, and the relationships between pictures, to suggest that something was awry, that something lay beneath the surface. Mexico blends beauty with the sinister, joy with despair, and mystery with the mundane. It’s those contradictions that interest me- and make me uncomfortable.

 

 

 

Short Bio

Andrew Sullivan has worked as a photographer in Kenya, Latin America, the Caribbean, and the United States. His work has been published by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the United States Olympic Committee, and many publications around the world. He has exhibited at Universidad Veracruzana, and other galleries in Mexico, Italy, and the United States. Based in San Miguel de Allende, Mexico, he uses photography as a tool for trying to understand daily life. He believes that photography can investigate truths in a way no other medium can. 

 

Related Links

www.andrewsullivanphoto.com

Yorgos Yatromanolakis – The Splitting of the Chrysalis & the Slow Unfolding of the Wings

Yorgos Yatromanolakis

The Splitting of the Chrysalis & the Slow Unfolding of the Wings

 

‘The Splitting of the Chrysalis & the Slow Unfolding of the Wings’ arose from my unforeseen return to my homeland and my residence there for four years. Isolated in the countryside of the island, I was constantly confronted with my traumatic past, my memories and myself.

 

 

Gradually, through wandering in nature, a conceivable field of action was created within me, an intermediate space full of transformative dynamics, a place of becoming. I surrendered to the fluidity of this space, to a paradoxical and cosmogenic ceremony. I was faced with the most enigmatic aspects of myself; I was searching for a new reality in which I would be able to exist. These photographs are part of a notebook, constructed through this experience, attempting to capture the cycle of an internal process of metamorphosis.

 

 

 

Short Bio

Yorgos Yatromanolakis lives and works between Athens and Crete. He works on long-term photography projects and turns them into books, experimenting with storytelling, materials and design. He has published three books, ‘Roadblock to Normality’ (2016), ‘Not provided’ (2016) and ‘The Splitting of the Chrysalis & the Slow Unfolding of the Wings’ (2018). He is co-founder of artist- run space ‘Zoetrope’, in Athens.

 

Related Links

www.yatrom.net

 

M.H. Frøslev – Unsettled City

M.H. Frøslev

Unsettled City

 

Unsettled City is a journey of a human in a metropolis. It portrays despair and love in a place where life at times can be very uncertain.

 

The book is a personal depiction of a claustrophobic environment with the cityscape as framework, captured in the cities of Saint Petersburg and Moscow over the last ten years. Through ninety-five photographs in contrast monochromes and dusty colours the book unfolds the night as a motif. Here we meet bulldogs, street fights and abandoned roads alongside loving glances, intimate moments and faded buildings, all quietly standing still, waiting for the night to die down and the light to rise again. Through disquieting atmospheres and raw sensitivity Unsettled City shows us how the people of the night alternately love and fear both the city and each other. With this book M.H. Frøslev portrays feelings of alienation, inequality and pain on a par with love, intimacy and fascination.

 

 

“As a narrator, I am looking for a place I can relate to and that moves me. These photographs are based on my own life and relations. The book is my encounter with the metropolis, but it is also a rediscovery of myself, and an examination of the feelings and relations that are associated with being connected to another person, a time and a place. I photograph my longing, my presence, my love and my fears. I photograph because it helps me understand my feelings. For me Unsettled City is about people finding love in the dark streets of a metropolis, where the night will either save or destroy you.” – M.H. Frøslev

 

 

 

Short Bio

Born 1988 in Copenhagen, Denmark. M.H. Frøslev worked in 2008 as photographic assistant for Danish Magnum photographer Jacob Aue Sobol in Copenhagen but moved initially in 2010 to Moscow and later to Saint Petersburg where he started the project Unsettled City. His infatuation with making pictures is what led M.H. Frøslev to explore the silent and haunting experience of walking after dark in the streets of Saint Petersburg and Moscow. Here he developed his photographic sense and his intimate relationship with the Russian cities.

 

Related Links

diskobay.org/books/unsettled-city/

 

Yiota Tsokou – The Distance

Yiota Tsokou

The Distance

I don’t need you – please stay.

I keep at arm’s length, as though I were a ghost stuck between two worlds. I linger in this moment and time is frozen. I have overanalyzed reality – cut it into little pieces – and now everything lies shattered; deformed.

 

 

The Distance story deals with that very state; how one’s experience of the human condition leaves its mark. It is a story which explores both closeness and togetherness, leaving plenty of room for definitions.

 

 

 

Short Bio

Yiota Tsokou is a Greece-based self-taught photographer. Her interest in photography sparked in 2014, when she started experimenting with analog photography. Her work has been published in a number of publications such as Agitate (Australia, October 2015), Photoklassik (Germany, September 2016), Adore Noir Magazine (Canada, October 2017), Click Magazine (Italy, December 2017), Photographize (USA, February 2018).

 

Related Links

bulbphotos.eu.com/yiota-tsokou

the distance – video 

 

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The Emerging Photographer Fund is supported by generous donors to the Magnum Foundation

Magnum Foundation

Jake Borden – In Ruins – Displaced Georgians in Tbilisi

Jake Borden

In Ruins – Displaced Georgians in Tbilisi

[ FUJIFILM / YOUNG TALENT AWARD 2018 SHORTLIST ]

On the outskirts of Georgia’s capital, Tblisi, an abandoned military hospital from the bygone Soviet era serves as a refuge to some one hundred and fifty families unable to find jobs and affordable housing. Tweny-five years after the fall of the Soviet Unions, the occupants represent a fraction of the nearly quarter million internally displaced people inside Georgia, who in 1993 were forced from their homes during government clashes with Russian backed separatists in Abkhazia and South Ossetia.

 

 

Local government pays little attention to the building, and when they do it’s to cut off electricity and water which residents have diverted through a jerry-rigged lattice of wires and pipes. Two decades after the conflict, many hold out hope that they will one day be able to return to their homeland and reunite with long lost family members.

 

 

 

Short Bio

Jake Borden is an American photojournalist based in Beirut, Lebanon. In 2015, Borden began assisting VII founder and National Geographic photographer John Stanmeyer, managing his extensive archive in the Berkshires and assisting him while abroad. Inspired by Stanmeyer, Borden set out to tell stories of that had the possibility for social impact at home and abroad. He is currently working on a longterm project in Lebanon exploring the lasting social impacts of conflict through the VII Masterclass program, and has had work published by international news outlets such as the BBC and Vice News.

 

Related Links

jakeborden.com

 

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The Fujifilm/Young Talent Award is supported by Fujifilm

 

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Anneke Paterson – Growing Pains

Anneke Paterson

Growing Pains

[ FUJIFILM / YOUNG TALENT AWARD 2018 SHORTLIST ]

These are the things I wish to keep, though I know I can’t. My generation is saying goodbye to its favorite places, even entire neighborhoods with cultural significance; the remnants of our childhoods are an Austin that seems too far gone. Some say that these changes which are overtaking our city, though they harm some, will benefit many. We’re not so sure: the changes are certainly capturing us all, though not equally. This trajectory is comparable to my own precipice of adulthood, which just as unsettled and dubious, unrelentingly pushes me onward. The boom is stretching us thin and wedging and an even deeper divide in a city whose infrastructures are deeply rooted in segregation; the city itself was designed for those who wished for it to be divided: us apart from them.

Now, areas of Austin which were designated for people of color are being overtaken by developers and corporations looking to exploit cheaper and vulnerable properties and persons. In my mid-twenties, I witnessing the effects of Austin’s historical segregation: historically Black and Latino neighborhoods are being stipped of their cultural and sentimental value just as I’m parting ways with my childhood and watching their physical spaces be replaced with novelty.

Though I am a native Austinite, I was naive to believe in the myth of the exceptionality of Austin, for which many others know as well: The Live Music Capital of the World, the place built on creatives and music and small-town sentiments. This identity does not speak for us all. Austin must confront its changing identity just as I must confront mine, what I thought of myself, of the city, no longer holds true, for better and for worse. My work explains my coming of age, expanding identity, and their parallel with the changing scape of this American city. These are friends, ex-lovers, strangers, all Austinites, connected by the experience of our remaining care-free days as adulthood and inescapable change looms.

Short Bio

Born and raised in Austin, Texas, Anneke Paterson is an early career photographer of humanity with a distinct interest in youth culture. In her work, Anneke considers the dynamics between what and who she photographs and her role as the image creator. Currently, she is focusing on personal narratives as a way of establishing a better understanding of the adapting world around her. Her photographic essay, Bitten by the Moon, which examined access to surgical healthcare for those with physical malformations or conditions in El Salvador, was published by Burn Magazine in 2017. Other works have been published by National Geographic Travel and National Geographic Books. Anneke is an undergraduate student of cultural anthropology at Texas State University, with a desire that this degree will serve her photographic perspective and guide narratives which include sensitive topics, such as the effects of urban development. Anneke is a member of The Photographic Museum of Humanity and Women Photo

 

Related Links

annekepaterson.com

 

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The Fujifilm/Young Talent Award is supported by Fujifilm

 

FujiFilm_Basic-Black

Abhishek Basu – The Rum Diary

Abhishek Basu

The Rum Diary

[ EPF 2018 SHORTLIST ]

The Rum Diary adopts the tone of a scrapbook whose dog-eared pages are found yellowing inside the baggy jeans pocket of many a photographer searching for their decisive moments. How long do you hold out your fishing rod in still water without conjuring up images of smoked salmon in your head at the slightest tug on the string (read: stirring of the heart)? Does the reality of the common carp you finally catch by dusk, not satisfy the tastebuds of the mind which have already feasted on the grilled slivers of the hyper-real?

 

It is out of this desire to relish life to its optimum best is borne a journey traced by this series of images. With the name providing an entry point into Thompson’s fictional universe, characters in the diary too are captured as at once flawed, haphazard, crooked and stumbling through life as they are extraordinary, silver-screened, charismatic and surreal. Taking from phrase ‘killing your darlings’ often used by writers, the diary delves into the voyeuristic tendencies that might have led to their creation in the first place. Till how far do I allow my intrusion to lead me by the hand? Does she ask me out for a dance? Do I buy her a drink? The quick-sand-like subjectivity of my darlingsmakes it difficult for me refrain from sinking. They say one is always a toe-dip away from being sucked in.

 

 

This tension between the two worlds weaves dialogues of ‘to dip or not to dip’ with every flip of the diary’s pages. This slippery slope of stance is traversed through questions of belonging, love, intimacy and desire, till before you know it your darling kills you.

Breathing life into memory is all the option one is left with to cling onto. Nostalgia is personified. A photographer’s dilemma is eulogised.

But after all, the heart longs to thump. And so begins again a plunge into the unknown or the casting of the fishing rod back into the murky waters of the pond.

 

Short Bio

Abhishek was born in 1990 in Tatanagar, Jharkhand, India . He uses the photographic medium within a wide range of reasons such as comprehending his own anxieties, to bridging social barriers. This is the main topic of discussion in his ongoing and work-in-progress book, The Rum Diary. In 2017, he received a scholarship from Burn Magazine to attend a workshop in Puerto Rico with Magnum photographer David Alan Harvey. Abhishek is a freelance photographer, and he works for various publishing houses on experimental story telling techniques, book design, curation and multimedia. Taking to Abbas’s advice, “buy a pair of shoes and fall in love with it”, Abhishek’s subjects span the wide variety of where life and his understanding of it has taken him. One can say that the photographer in him attempts to make the most out of the power of his lens every day.

 

Related Links

abhishek.photoshelter.com

 

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The Emerging Photographer Fund is supported by generous donors to the Magnum Foundation

Magnum Foundation

Fatima Abreu Ferreira – How to disappear completely

Fatima Abreu Ferreira

How to disappear completely

[ EPF 2018 SHORTLIST ]

How to disappear completely is a work of struggle, obsession and complete hallucination.
I´ve worked as a psychologist for over a decade. I had a steady job, a long-time boyfriend and solid expectations about my future: I would marry, have kids, continue to help other people and get older next to my loved ones.
But, around my 33rd birthday something changed. My partner’s father died the day after my birthday due to lung cancer and our entire world collapsed. The loss made me rethink my entire life and I decided to change my path.
A month after my 33rd birthday I had quit my job and the life I had to return to my childhood home to study and work on photography.

 

 

Life has it was had stopped being, and this was a scary notion but not as scary as what came afterwards.
Upon my return, I realized how my family had changed: my nephews grew up, my sisters turned into two estranged women and my mother shrank her soul into her old age. We had all started to loose ourselves after my father passing 10 years before but now, we had no understanding of each other nor of ourselves.
I realized I had also lost track of my friends as they had grown into new families and goals that I didn’t have and my hometown morphed into such a senseless touristic destination that I felt that I could only photograph the surroundings or at night.

 

 

I felt displaced. A strange body on a foreign dimension, trying to find myself, lost between the one I should become and the person I used to be. All my memories had lost their meaning so I began trying to register them again. I photographed my daily life, my family, my friends, I went back to my family photo albums and one thing I´ve discovered is that for me, memory is only relevant as it relates to the present. So, instead of trying to be realistic about what I remembered, I morphed these memories into my present nightmarish sense of self. My displacement. My dream within a dream.

 

Short Bio

Fatima Abreu Ferreira is a Portuguese photographer, born in Guarda, in 1983. In 1988 she moved to the north of the country and became a psychologist. In 2016 Fatima abandoned psychology to work and study photography.
Fatima is mainly a self-taught photographer but has always developed training and workshops with her main influences such as Anders Petersen and Jacob Aue Sobol. In 2018 she completed the Artistic Photography Master at IPCI and started an independent publishing house called Red String. She has multiple publications and has exhibited nationally and internationally. Fatima’s body of work has a strong humanistic view as a way of approaching life in both public and private contexts and her aesthetics is predominantly black and white with a dark and grainy style providing an intense, visceral and dramatic view of the subject.

 

Related Links

www.fatimaabreuferreira.com

 

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The Emerging Photographer Fund is supported by generous donors to the Magnum Foundation

Magnum Foundation

Liza Ambrossio – The rage of devotion – La ira de la devoción

Liza Ambrossio

The rage of devotion – La ira de la devoción

[ FUJIFILM / YOUNG TALENT AWARD 2018 FINALIST ]

Some time ago I decided to change my life in the most extraordinary way possible. I looked in and without intending it I remembered the phrase with which my mother said goodbye the last time I saw her at sixteen years old – “I wish you well, and believe me I hope you’ll become strong and brave, so you can be merciless when the time comes to destroy your body and crush your soul the next time we see each other”- After an overwhelming emotional breakdown, I started this series of images intermingling with pictorial canvases and photographs of my family archive to impel the observer to immerse themselves in my psychology.

 

 

I stumble, but in the same way freeing myself, finding their lascivious looks, my fear of touch and the instinctive repulsion that represents for me the concept of “family”. In “The rage of devotion” I discover that although I look, I don’t want to see, because what lives inside me, looks and it is completely monstrous.

I am a being led by demons. After leaving home at sixteen I decided never to return to the family home, but I needed a powerful symbolic connection with my Mother. To acquire the old photo file that I included in my project, I spoke with the housekeeper of my mother’s house to steal the images of the old family albums while I paid for them during my student years between high school and university.

 

 

All my night images are photographed in the early hours when I worked for the police press or “Mexican red note” when I had just left my mother’s house. In them I discovered that all the chaos that was inside me was also the trace of the chaos that it was outside of me. In my country there is a war that is not talked about, and I started to face a war against the machismo exercised by the women of my family towards me. As for medical images or strange diseases such as -double iris in the eye-, are the consequence of my obsession with medicine and my almost four years of dedication to a specialist doctor of rare diseases.

 

 

Short Bio

Liza Ambrossio is a young Mexican artist based in Madrid, Spain. Her body of work combines photographs of macabre archive with cryptic paintings, performance, intervention, installations, videos, psychology, lucid nightmares, science fiction, ero-guro and witchcraft that come together in free association. Winner of the first prize in the Voies Off Award 2018 of Les Rencontres de la Photographie, Arles, France, as well as the FNAC New Talent Award, 2018. Liza is the invice of the scholarship portfolio review in the FotoFest of Houston 2018 and the 6th Edition of the (TAI) Photography Talent Grant. In 2017, she won the Discoveries scholarship of the PHotoESPAÑA festival and La Fabrica and the ‘Luz del Norte prize’ in Monterrey, México. Currently, she is nominated for the award Plat(t)form of the Fotomuseum Winterthur. She has been selected for New Visions 2018 in the Cortona On The Move festival, Italy and she had the first honorific mention for the Emerging Prize within the ‘Encontros Da Image festival’, Portugal 2018. In 2018, she presented her first photobook “The rage of devotion”.

 

Related Links

lizaambrossio.com

 

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The Fujifilm/Young Talent Award is supported by Fujifilm

 

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Annalisa Natali Murri – A Respectable Family (The Murri’s Affair)

Annalisa Natali Murri

A Respectable Family (The Murri’s Affair)

[ EPF 2018 FINALIST ]

This project comes out from my urge to put back together the pieces of an infamous story that has accompanied my family since September 2nd, 1902. That day Linda Murri, daughter of my great-grandfather, had her husband, count Bonmartini, stabbed to death in his house in Bologna. For this crime my great-grandfather Tullio, Linda’s brother, was unjustly accused and served a sentence several years in prison, marking the life of my family forever. This ongoing project, centered in identity, intimacy and memory, roots itself in my own family archives, official documents and other family heirlooms, and aims to preserve the thread between past and present: my wish is to recover connections within my own family heritage, inquiring about memory and how the events experienced by my ancestors have been affecting subsequent family generations, including myself.

 

 

Short Bio

Annalisa Natali Murri, freelance photographer, approached for the first time to photography at age 27, while attending Architectural and Urban Photography School in Valencia (Spain). After completing her studies in engineering, soon she began to alternate her work to photography, focusing on personal research works and documentary projects, mainly inspired by social issues and their psychological consequences.

In 2014 she was selected as an attendee for LOOKbetween mentorship program and in 2015 she was named one of the 30 emerging photographers to watch at PDN’s 30.

Her works have been awarded and highlighted in several international contests and awards, including 70th and 71st POYi, Sony World Photography Award, Burnmagazine Emerging Photographer Fund, Catchlight’s Activist Awards and PHM Women Photographers Grant.

 

Related Links

annalisanatalimurri.com

 

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The Emerging Photographer Fund is supported by generous donors to the Magnum Foundation

Magnum Foundation

Rosie Brock – And Ever Shall Be

Rosie Brock

And Ever Shall Be

[ FUJIFILM / YOUNG TALENT AWARD 2018 FINALIST ]

My childhood spent in the American South and the regionally specific encounters I had there served as the key motivation for this body of work. After spending three years in art school in New York City, I felt compelled to return to the area of the country where I had spent my formative years. Amidst the oppressive July air, I sought out individuals and scenes reminiscent of my own youth. The resulting visual narrative focuses on the nuanced relationship between the region’s deep-seated mythicism and its current socioeconomic reality. This confluence of past and present is furthered articulated by the recurring motif of the archetypal county fair.

 

 

Short Bio

Rosie Brock (b. 1995) recently received a BFA in Photography & Video from the School of Visual Arts and was a student winner in the PDN Photo Annual 2018. Born in South Carolina and raised in both Gulf Coast Florida and Virginia, she is heavily inspired by her childhood spent in the American South. Brock currently resides in Virginia.

 

Related Links

www.rosie-brock.com

 

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The Fujifilm/Young Talent Award is supported by Fujifilm

 

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Tommaso Protti – Terra Vermelha

Tommaso Protti

Terra Vermelha

[ EPF 2018 FINALIST ]

The Amazon Rainforest is often referred to as the ‘Lungs of our Planet,’ still imagined as the unspoiled home of isolated, disconnected tribes. A thick, green stain on the map — the world’s largest — laid there by the hand of God, with no sign of man’s.

From up close though, it’s way more than woods, mines and dams: cities have grown out of the jungle, into a green favela. Fields are burning, and the dark, steady stream of the Amazon river a safe conduct for cocaine. The riverbanks are littered with trash, and bodies.

“Terra Vermelha,” which means red earth, is essentially a portrait of the modern day Brazilian Amazon that explores and illustrates the intersecting social and environmental crises of the region, in the states of Pará, Amazonas, Maranhao, Rondonia and Roraima.

 

 

In recent years, environmental destruction, rural and urban violence have reached unprecedented heights in the region.

The urban centres have become amongst the most violent in the world, the result of rapid and uncontrolled urban expansion that continue to grow and drug wars from increased cocaine production while Amazon pirates stalk the river robbing and killing as well as migrants brought by the crisis in neighbouring Venezeula and economic migrants to work on mega projects.

The region is the deadliest in the world for land rights, environmental and Indigenous activists who are terrorized by land grabbers and violent extractive gangs in a violent grab for the regions vast natural resources. Poverty stricken illegal wildcat miners and timber cutters.

 

 

Deforestation, unregulated development, pollution, crime. All of these scenarios are driven by the same forces; poverty, weak institutions, corruption and savage self-interest. More than in other places, in the Amazon region it becomes clear that land is worth more than human life. And on the path towards the destruction of the planet, the first and closest step for mankind is still its own annihilation.

 

Short Bio

Tommaso Protti is an Italian photographer based in São Paulo, Brazil. He started his photographic career in 2011 after graduating in Political Science and International Relations. Since then, he has devoted himself on creating his own long-term projects. His works were exhibited internationally in The Royal Albert Hall (London), Greenwich Heritage Centre (Woolwich, UK), Benaki Museum (Athens), MACRO Museum of Contemporary Arts (Rome), 10b Photography Gallery (Rome), Fotoleggendo (Rome), Les Recontres d’Arles (France), Prix Bayeux-Calvados des Correspondants de Guerre festival (France), Belfast Photo (Ireland), C40 Mayors Summit (Mexico City), UN COP22 (Marrakesh, Marocco), PARTE Contemporary Art Fair (São Paulo, Brazil). Tommaso’s work was published in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Time, National Geographic, The New Yorker, The Guardian, The Independent, Le Monde, Corriere della Sera, etc.

 

Related Links

tommasoprotti.com

 

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The Emerging Photographer Fund is supported by generous donors to the Magnum Foundation

Magnum Foundation

David Molina – Go to Become

David Molina

Go to Become

[ EPF FINALIST ] 

Go to Become Is a fictional record inspired by Lycanthropy telltales that take Barcelona night-club scene as the main stage, where for its clubbers, the use of alcohol, psychoactive substances and the beats of techno, are a way to achieve a basic state of being in which people is lead by their innermost instincts, like Werewolves.

The idea of Transformation and the longing for a change to come in the aftermath of a great socio-economical crisis in Europe are key to the work.

 

 

An entheogen, from Greek language, literally means “generating God within.”

It is a psychoactive substance that induces a spiritual experience and traditionally have been used to supplement many diverse practices geared towards achieving transcendence.

But this transformation takes place only once a week, almost like an spiritual ritual in which its practitioners can escape from reality,

Almost touching the void,
almost touching God’s hand.

 

 

Short Bio

Born in Tarragona on 30 October of 1991, David studied Plastic Arts from 2009 to 2012 where he found his way of expression and started exploring photography.

In 2015, David embarked on a year-long placement at several refugee centres in Belgium as part of the European Voluntary Service (EVS). This experience gave raise to his work “The Long Way Home”, which was published in the British Journal of Photography’s September 2016 issue and was exhibited at the City University of New York that same year.

He reached the final in Burn Magazine’s 2015 Emerging Photographer Fund and was shortlisted for the renowned Gomma Photography Grant award in 2016.

With a passion for artistic expression and creativity, David Molina balances his time between his own photographic practice and his work as Artistic Director of La Nuu Photography Festival, held in Rubí (Barcelona).

 

Related Links

cargocolletive.com/davidmolinagadea/

 

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The Emerging Photographer Fund is supported by generous donors to the Magnum Foundation

Magnum Foundation

Ronghui Chen – Freezing Land

Ronghui Chen

Freezing Land

[ EPF 2018 FINALIST ]

We’re used to thinking of Chinese cities in the context of growth, but the country’s northeast region is an exception. Bordering Russia and North Korea, the region, with ample natural resources, was the first to develop heavy industries in the 1960s and prospered for decades. There were 15 million immigrants to northeastern China in the Mao’s era.

But since the 2000s, the northeast has become China’s most recessionary land as resources dwindled and other regions caught up. Dying industries and shortages of opportunities have been forcing people out of their home and to other parts of China in pursuit of work.

My project, Freezing Land, aims to explore descendants of immigrants living in the northeast. Meanwhile, Chinese President Xi Jinping started a campaign called the “Chinese Dream”. But what does this mean to the the once prosperous land? What’s the story of today’s northeastern China?

 

 

It is difficult to encounter subjects on the street in an environment of minus 30 degrees centigrade. Therefore, I used social video app, Kuai shou, looking for young people who were willing to share their stories. The young people I met were experiencing a sense of uncertainty. They were facing a choice to leave for challenges in bigger cities, or stay behind and embrace their fate. Their voices were sparsely documented by Chinese media or through other mediums. Few people knew about their stories, colorful, yet full of loneliness.

I also photographed the derelict landscape – places that are once lively but now forgotten. During this process, the emotion expressed by these young people – a mixed sense of hesitation, loneliness, and hope – has brought me resonance.

 

 

 

Short Bio

Ronghui Chen (b.1989) is a Chinese photographer and storyteller based in Shanghai, whose work focus on China’s urbanization in long term projects. He has devoted himself to the study the relationship between China’s urbanization and individual’s experiences. Known for his specific interest in these social issues, he had published his first collection of photographs named Chen Ronghui, which is one of the book among China’s Contemporary Photography Catalog. His projects have brought him many awards, including World Press Photo prize, Three Shadows Photography Award & AlPA special prize.

 

Related Links

ronghuichen.com

 

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The Emerging Photographer Fund is supported by generous donors to the Magnum Foundation

Magnum Foundation

Hajime Kimura – Mass/Remains

Hajime Kimura

Mass/Remains

[ EPF 2018 FINALIST ]

Mass/Remains is an on-going project that tries to discover the movement of the football histories during the 90s in former Yugoslavia which ended up to influence Japanese football milestone and could be connected to compose the current geopolitics that has been reconstructed by the societies of former Yugoslavia.

On 13 May 1990, at a football stadium in Zagreb, Red Star Belgrade vs Dinamo Zagreb. Through the TV in Japan, I still remember I just wondered why such a riot happened in a football game. A lot of spectators, hooligans and police all jumbled up and rolled into the field. They looked like a flock of waves rather than only a mob. I was 8 at that time, a couple of years before the professional football league (J-League) started in Japan. Over time, many Yugoslavian players came to Japan in the mid of the 90s, Dragan Stoikovich who was a great football player in the history of Europe was to join a football team, of course as a player. I was just excited without knowing why he had to play in Japan at the very peak of his career. I also played football when I was a teenager to be like him.

In 2016 in Belgrade, I met a Serbian man who was in the riot at that time and also whom I have watched several times in the football games in Tokyo when I was kids. His name is Miša Bukumirovic, 70, married with a Croatian wife and he has worked as a single official physiotherapist for Red Star Belgrade since 1986.