Author Archive for burn magazine

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Coffee


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Day 5: Coffee and soggy newspaper. Must be Mondayitis! Photo by @simonedepeak Simone De Peak #burndiary #burnmagazine #newcastle #nsw #australia #streetphotography #photojournalism #coffee

Morning walk


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Day 5: The morning walk along Newcastle Break Wall… Photo by @simonedepeak Simone De Peak #burndiary #burnmagazine #newcastle #nsw #australia #clouds #landscape #noir #documentary

Child


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Day 4: Babysitting duties with Nephew Flynn & Elwood this afternoon. Flynn 2yrs, and the younger of the two, climbs a cupboard to look out a window to watch his parents as they leave the house. Photo by @simonedepeak Simone De Peak #burndiary #burnmagazine #newcastle #nsw #australia #photojournalism #family #noir #documentary

Public phone


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Day 4: Before today, Ross of West Wallsend hadn’t set foot inside a public phone booth since the late 1980’s back when there was one on almost every corner. Picking up the phone and hearing a dial tone, he was rather pleased that this one worked as he pointed out to me that most public phone booths are vandalised these days. Photo @simonedepeak Simone De Peak #burndiary #burnmagazine #westwallsend #newcastle #nsw #australia #photojournalism #portrait

Cat


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Day 4: Sunday morning stare-off with Puska the Cat. He was a stray that I feed about 10yrs ago, he pretty much rules the house now! Photo by @simonedepeak Simone De Peak #burndiary #burnmagazine #newcastle #nsw #australia #photojournalism #cat #noir

FujiFilm x Young EPF Award

EPF2014

Photo © Kiyana Hayeri, Honorable Mention – under 30 EPF 2014 Talent for her essay, “Jense Degar” (The Other Sex)

 

FujiFilm x Young EPF Award

 

Today we are proud to announce that FujiFilm is partnering with us to offer several prizes for our category “Young EPF Award” (introduced last year). It’s open to all photographers who are 25 or younger (born on Jan 1st, 1990 or later).

All you need to do is enter into the EPF… and if you’re 25 or younger, you’ll be automatically eligible for the “Young EPF Award” as well.

Fuji offers a cash prize of $5,000 to the winner of the “Young EPF Award”, and also adds a camera valued in excess of $1,000.

Additionally, they’re offering 4 extra cameras as well (all also valued in excess of $1,000 each) for different runners up.

Of course we are immensely proud of this partnership… and hope in this way we can give back even more to the young emerging ones amongst us… who just might need it more than we can ever imagine.

This all gets added alongside our existing “main” EPF grant which is already $10,000… and both the EPF grant and the Young EPF Award are not mutually exclusive, so you could potentially win both… imagine that.

The EPF is accepting submissions until May 1st (more info here)… so hurry and submit your story… if ever there was a time to emerge, that time is now.

 

FujiFilm

Tell It Like It Is… Circles

Tell It Like It Is… Circles

 

photo by Mariah Leal Paes

photo by Mariah Leal Paes

We are all exhausted, but we are finished printing. Burn photo editor Diego Orlando, creative director Anton Kusters, and I have just finished being on press in Treviso, Italy for the re-printing of my 1967 first book Tell It Like It Is . I do not ever remember an all out effort like this one. We eye balled every printing detail to a fanatical point.

Many of you know the story of this book, yet most likely many of you do not. In 1967 I was 23, in grad school, and married. My first son Bryan was just seven months old. I had no money, was unknown as a photographer, and no mentors. I was from a middle class all white neighborhood in Virginia Beach, Va. and yet I felt compelled to use my camera for social good. In the last weeks of the summer of ’67, before returning to the Univ. of Missouri J-school , I decided to photograph a disadvantaged black neighborhood. The Liggins family opened their door to me, and they became my singular focus as a microcosm of the whole. I wanted to make a difference. To make people aware. Perhaps naive, yet nevertheless sincere.

James Liggins and his wife Callie had seven children aged 2-15 years old and lived in a five story tenement apartment building. Callie often made a bed for me on the sofa, I had a darkroom set up nearby to process and print, and I lived the story. For approximately one month I spent all my time with the Liggins.

My friend Charles R. Hofheimer and my college roommate Masaaki Okada were collaborators. Charles had been working with organisations aiding the disadvantaged and was the producer of the book. Masaaki did the layout. I went back to school. We sold the book for $2. and the money went to the Norfolk, Va. Ministerial Association to buy food and clothing for the neighborhood. Our intent was to raise enough money and create an awareness to create public action to save the neighborhood. Four months after we published, in 1968,  Dr. Martin Luther King was assassinated and life in America changed forever. That same year civil rights activist and Presidential candidate Robert Kennedy was also assassinated. A dark year in the United States of America.

I finished grad school, got a job as a newspaper photographer in Topeka, Kansas and later freelanced and by the time I was 28 had my second son Erin and had managed to start shooting for NatGeo. Tell It Like It Is was forgotten for the next 45 years. Life for me had just moved on to other things.  I lost contact with the Liggins family completely. As a matter of fact, after all this time both Charles and I had even forgotten their names.

About 10 years ago I was doing a presentation of my work at the New York Public Library. Bruce Davidson was in the audience. He saw a few pictures I was showing from Tell It Like It Is. He asked me when I shot the pictures. I told him 1967. He then said that my little booklet and document had preceded his iconic East 100th Street by 4 years. This surprised me. I had no sense of the context of  my essay, however on that day I realised perhaps I  had done something of historic value. In 1967 I  had zero contacts with the New York art or editorial world and no sense of what to do with my work at all.

In any case,  from that day with Davidson, I felt compelled to republish Tell It Like It Is. That day has come.

We have done two things these two weeks in Italy. First to print a consumer new version of the book. Finest quality. Designed and produced by Anton and Diego. Gratitude always my friends. We have also manufactured an exact replica of the original $2. book, reprinted the 35 contact sheets,  and I will return to my darkroom at home now to make one print from Tell It Like It Is for a special boxed edition of 100 for serious collectors.

 

davidalanharvey-tellitlikeitis-cover

 

This all follows a search for the Liggins family which I felt I must do before publishing. I  had no idea where they were, and as I mentioned, I did not even know their name. My filmmaker son Erin and I hit the streets last October with a copy of the original book ( only 5 copies of it are in my bank vault). No luck in finding anyone who knew who the people were in my little booklet. I was saved by a story in The Virginian-Pilot who did a really nice piece on my search. Lois Liggins saw the Teresa Annas story in the newspaper and emailed me “I am from the Liggins family”.  Lois was seven in 1967 and she was the cover of the book. She is also the cover of the new version and helped me to arrange a joyous reunion with the surviving six members of the Liggins family. We have stayed in constant touch since. We were friends then and are again now. A positive and happy story amongst so much racist negativity on the news channels. Erin filmed this search and reunion. Lois is now 56 and a lead mental health supervisor in the same neighborhood of Berkeley.

Circles.

The LOOK3 Festival of the Photograph this June will feature Tell It Like It Is as an exhibition curated by New York Times Magazine Director of Photography Kathy Ryan and Curator/Editor Scott Thode. I plan to have Lois and perhaps other members of the family join us of course. What could be more rewarding as a documentary photographer?

Pages off the press need to dry. Binding will be done soonest. I will spend most of April in the darkroom. My home now in the Outer Banks is only about 75 miles from where the Liggins family is now. They plan to come sit on my front porch. My intentions for the original book are the same intentions I have now.

Circles.

-david alan harvey-

 

Photo by 7 year old grand daughter Derica Liggins

Photo by 11 year old Derica White, grand daughter of Lois Liggins (center) – October 2014 at our first reunion after 47 years

Redhead Beach


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The crowd at Redhead Beach wade into the surf to cool off as a coal ship on the horizon heads back out to sea from Newcastle Port… Photo by @simonedepeak Simone De Peak #burndiary #burnmagazine #redhead #newcastle #nsw #australia #beach #surf #photojournalism #landscape

gil bartz – ukraine

Emerging Photographer Fund – 2014 Shortlist

 

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ESSAY CONTAINS EXPLICIT CONTENT
EPF 2014 – SHORTLIST

Gil Bartz

Ukraine

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After I graduated from University I took all my money and the next night train to Kiev. For two month I travelled by train, bus and an old Lada Niva. Most of my photos are from people I stayed with for a couple of days or just a night. I never knew where to go next so I asked my Hosts and they always knew another friend or place that I had to visit. In Yasinovataya a small village near Donetsk I met Irina and her brother Dima and stayed at their grandparents` house for more than two weeks. The first photo of my series is a message from Irina from August. Most photos were taken in the year before the Ukraine crisis started.

 

Bio

Gil Bartz (b.1981, Germany)
After I finished school in 2002 I started working for television.
In 2007 I quit my job as a camera assistant and went to Berlin to study cinematography. In 2012 I graduated from the Film and Television University ‘Konrad Wolf’ in Potsdam- Babelsberg with Diploma.
For the next two years I traveled through the Ukraine, Azerbaijan and Russia taking pictures.
I live in Berlin. In 2013 I bought a tiny cabin near Poland where I spend most of my free time. Actually I am working on a long term project about life around my wooden cabin.

 

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Gil Bartz

 

 

 

 

 

 

Saturday


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Day 3: Today is Saturday and the sun is back with a vengeance. I am spending some quality time with my good friend Gareth as we laze in the sun at his local, Redhead Beach. He tans, I burn to a crisp! In two short weeks he will be heading off on an adventure of a lifetime travelling to South America and ongoing chasing the sun around the globe for the next two years after. I’m going to miss his potty mouth, that needs to be washed out with soap! Photo by @simonedepeak Simone De Peak #burndiary #burnmagazine #redhead #newcastle #nsw #australia #beach #surf #photojournalism #weather #sun #weekend

The Barber Shop


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Day 2: After a coffee in Carrington this afternoon, I swung by The Carrington Barber Shop where Frank Martin has been cutting hair for the last 41yrs. As he cut Brenton a regular clients hair and Sam who has been going there since a toddler read the local newspaper while waiting, I asked Frank after 41yrs in business did he still love his job, to which he replied “It’s all I’ve ever done and you’ve got to love it to stay in it this long.” Words of wisdom right there, love what you do… Thanks Frank! Photo by @simonedepeak Simone De Peak #burndiary #burnmagazine #carrington #newcastle #nsw #australia #photojournalism #barber #everyday

Morning drive


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Day 2: The morning drive to work. As a photographer on a daily newspaper you head into the office each day and never quite know what fun you’ll be up to that day. You could be sent on a court job, a portrait cover for a weekend magazine feature or sent packing to a bushfire, the latter two usually requiring a lot of driving. But days like today, rainy days are my favourite. When most people want to stay inside dry and away from the cold, that’s usually when I want to head out and play! Photo by @simonedepeak Simone De Peak #burndairy #burnmagazine #newcastle #nsw #australia #travel #roadtrip #weather

Newcastle Ocean Baths


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Day 1: A trip to the Newcastle Ocean Baths for a swim after work this afternoon turned out to be fruitless. Normally a popular location for a swim on hot days, not a soul could be seen as the baths slowly started to refill after a sighting of the deadly blue-ringed octopus closed the ocean baths to be drained. Photo by Simone De Peak @simonedepeak #burndiary #burnmagazine #photojournalism #ocean #newcastle #nsw #australia #swim

Swimmers


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Day 1: With humid almost summer like temperatures this afternoon a group of friends enjoy a dip along the Cowrie Hole, in Newcastle East Australia… Photo by Simone De Peak @simonedepeak #burndiary #burnmagazine #photojournalism #newcastle #australia @burndiary

Sharks


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Photo by: @duniaimaji (Fahreza Ahmad). Pieces of a #shark age 5 months traded on Peunayong #traditional #market, #Aceh Province, #Indonesia. For Indonesian people, shark is one of the most preferred dishes.

Market


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Photo by: @duniaimaji (Fahreza Ahmad). #Broilers trader on Peunayong #traditional #market, #Aceh Province, #Indonesia. Traditional market is characteristic of developing countries. Low income makes people tend to choose traditional market than modern market.

marta berens – suiti

Emerging Photographer Fund – 2014 Shortlist

 

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EPF 2014 – SHORTLIST

Marta Berens

Suiti

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The history of the Suiti people goes back almost 400 years to a romantic story from 1623 when the ruler of the Alsunga region (Kurzeme, Latvia), Johan Ulrich von Schwerin, in order to marry a Polish court lady Barbara Konarska, agreed to re-convert to the Catholic faith. To distinguish residents of Alsunga from Protestants Johan ordered them to wear specific costumes. These have become an important element of identity for the Suiti. Nowadays, protecting their identity, brought by their ancestors through centuries is still important and makes this religious minority very special. Visiting Alsunga is a trip to a place where time passes slowly, people have a strong relation with nature and a romantic story from the past is still present.

 

Bio

Born in Warsaw, Poland.
In 2012 graduated from the Documentary Workshop with Michal Luczak, at Academy of Photography in Warsaw.
September 2012 – June 2013 member of Mentoring Programme lead by Sputnik Photos collective with Adam Panczuk as a mentor.
Since October 2013 student of Institute of Creative Photography at Silesian University in Opava, Czech Republic.

 

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Marta Berens