Author Archive for burn magazine

Page 2 of 72

Hello from NYC


Edit this

Hello! @burndiary followers this is my first post from New York City.This is Joseph Michael Lopez @josephmlopezI am a Cuban-Puerto Rican #NYC born photographer. I currently spend my time on the streets building my long form projects and doing editorial work. My camera of choice has been an analog #Leica since 2002, but more recently I’ve been taking pictures with a square frame on my iPhone. I’m excited to share my personal report this week with you all!iPhone image by Joseph Michael Lopez @josephmlopez

Emerging Photographer Fund 2015

Emerging Photographer Fund 2015

Youth Denied: Young Migrants in Greece

Photo © Alessandro Penso, EPF 2014 Winner

 

Now is the time for some of you to start thinking about our Emerging Photographer Fund for 2015…

We will have at least $10,000. grant funding for an emerging photographer to finish a current project or begin a new one based on previous work.

Those of us on the Burn team are very proud to be able to support this grant for a photographer who might indeed be relatively unknown today, but will be an icon tomorrow.
An esteemed EPF Jury will be selected to choose the grant recipient.
We will announce the recipient at the LOOK 3 Festival of the Photograph in June of 2015….
The deadline for submission is May 1, 2015.
Please see our submissions page
I started this grant on my old Road Trips blog back in 2007 with my own money. Since then generous anonymous donors to Burn through the Magnum Foundation have kept the EPF alive and flourishing.
Please take a close look at your own work. Think body of work and/or narrative. Your work may be of either journalistic or artistic imperative. We are simply looking for serious work of any type where funding would help in the completion of this work. Authorship is the key.

 

Call for submissions

 

The Emerging Photographer Fund 2015 is now open for submissions!

The deadline for entry is May 1st, 2015 (6pm PST)

The winner will receive $10,000
and other awards will be announced soon.

Enter here!

 

More information here: http://www.burnmagazine.org/emerging-photographer-grant/

Last post from South Sudan


Edit this

A shot from tonight’s evening clinic. South Sudan is one of the world’s youngest and most volatile countries, yet I’ve found myself immersed in a place where the people work together night and day to maintain peace and provide healthcare, food and shelter for those who need it most. Thank you to Dr. Jill Seaman who invited me to visit Old Fangak and witness the great work you do here. #southsudanmedicalrelief www.sudanmedicalrelief.orgThis is my last post for @burndiary from South Sudan – thanks for following along and thank you to @davidalanharvey and @diegorlando for hosting me. Photo by Katie Basile @basilekatie

Gatkuor


Edit this

At night we always have a headlamp on. Mainly so we don’t bump into any unsuspecting critters. Here is Gatkuor, by the light of my headlamp. His leg was amputated after he suffered a snake bite. I see him several times a day on the clinic compound and he is healing well. Photo by Katie Basile @basilekatie #southsudanmedicalrelief

giulio di sturco – ganges death of a river

Emerging Photographer Fund – 2014 Shortlist

 

Hover over the image for navigation and full screen controls
EPF 2014 – SHORTLIST

Giulio Di Sturco

Ganges, Death of a River

play this essay

 

“The Ganges is a prime example of the unresolved contradiction between man and the environment. The Ganges is a river intimately connected with every aspect of Indian life. It is a source of water, energy and livelihood for millions of people who live along the banks of this river, thanks to the fertile lands flushing, provides food to more than one-third of the Indian population. Its ecosystem also includes one of the most numerous and varied animal and plant species. Despite what today is one of the most polluted rivers in the world because of toxic waste every day flock to the factories in its waters, damaging human health and the environment that surrounds him convulsing.”
What will happen tomorrow? Is the Ganges destined to die under the blows of humanity or can we believe that anything will change?

The last Chapters of the project will be:

1) Bangladesh: life along the Ganges as the construction of new dams along the river continues to upset the balance of the lives of people who live along the waters.

2) The Ganges Delta and Sundarbans: documenting the consequences of the rising of sea level and the simultaneous drying of the waters of the river itself.

3) Solutions: the World Bank has just set up a fund to be used for the “cleaning” of the river Ganges. I will show what has been done and what is being done to save the river and the solutions to the problem of pollution of this sacred river.

 

Bio

Giulio Di Sturco (b.1979 Italy) studied at the European Institute of Design and Visual Arts in Rome. In 2007 he moved to India where his spent the next five years refining his visual vocabulary, working in close collaboration with Greenpeace, MSF, WHO and Action Aid throughout much of Asia and Africa. In 2009 Giulio joined the VII Mentor Program. His awards include a World Press Photo first prize, as well as first prizes in the Sony Photography Awards, and the British Journal of Photography International Photography Awards among others. Giulio is currently represented by Getty Reportage and is a regular contributor to The New York Times, Vanity Fair, The Sunday Times Magazine, Geo and Financial Times among other publications. He based in Bangkok and continues to work throughout Europe, Africa and Asia. Much of his personal work focuses on human adversity in climates of environmental and technological evolution.

 

Related links

Giulio Di Sturco

 

 

 

 

 

 

Coffee in the Morning Light


Edit this

Coffee in the soft morning light before the world really heats up. To the right is our sophisticated plumbing system. Old Fangak has fresh water from wells drilled by the Alaska Sudan Medical Project. Water is hauled from the wells to homes primarily by women and girls.

Ladies of Old Fangak


Edit this

The beautiful ladies of Old Fangak. #southsudan #southsudanmedicalrelief photo by Katie Basile @basilekatie

James Wuar


Edit this

Another walkabout with my guide and translator James Wuar. Today we trekked to nearby villages and interviewed Nuer people who have been forced from their homes by war. The walk was a combination of swamps and dry cracked earth. @basilekatie photo by Katie Basile

Ladies


And here are the fine ladies we spent the day with. Nuer dancing is playful, aggressive and beautiful. Photo by Katie Basile @basilekatie

And here are the fine ladies we spent the day with. Nuer dancing is playful, aggressive and beautiful. Photo by Katie Basile @basilekatie

On the street in Old Fangak


On the street in Old Fangak after a full day of Nuer dancing at the Women's Center. A good day. Photo by Katie Basile @basilekatie  #southsudan

On the street in Old Fangak after a full day of Nuer dancing at the Women’s Center. A good day. Photo by Katie Basile @basilekatie #southsudan

From inside the tukel


From inside the tukel. It’s hard to believe that a small house made of mud has solar powered electricity and wifi. I am staying on the South Sudan Medical Relief compound and the tukel I am in serves as the doctor’s office. I am lucky to have wifi… Old Fangak has very little Internet access and only one television in the whole village of 18,000 residents and 25,000 internally displaced people. Photo by Katie Basile @basilekatie

From inside the Tukel


From inside the tukel. It’s hard to believe that a small house made of mud has solar powered electricity and wifi. I am staying on the South Sudan Medical Relief compound and the tukel I am in serves as the doctor’s office. I am lucky to have wifi… Old Fangak has very little Internet access and only one television in the whole village of 18,000 residents and 25,000 internally displaced people. Photo by Katie Basile @basilekatie

isabella stahl – left behind

Hover over the image for navigation and full screen controls

 

EPF 2014 – SHORTLIST

Isabella Stahl

Left Behind

play this essay

 

When I grew up I despised my village. I felt trapped by the dull normality, the narrow-minded people and the lack of amusements. I was depressed, bored and anxious to get out. Several years have passed and I’m now living in one of the largest cities in the world. Despite satisfying my adolescent desire to escape, I feel a longing to return to the place I so badly wanted to leave behind. When I’m far away and distanced from my past, I can value what I’m no longer part of. I return, and I see what before was hidden in the dark shadows of my youth. I admire the beauty of the landscape, the calm, the romantic light and the endless bright summer nights. But there are two sides of my present experience. The sound of the river’s flowing stream or the birds singing will never drown out the endlessly thoughts spinning in my head. I am still lost. I walk my old paths as I’m searching for answers for the scars in a childhood that formed who I am today. I photograph my brother growing up and my father who never will. I photograph the people that still live here and the animals I’ve always felt more close to. I use photography to help understand my surroundings and myself. “Left Behind” is a story about Sweden from my perspective today.

 

Bio

Isabella Stahl was born in northern Sweden in 1984 and now lives and works in New York City. She studied at one of Sweden’s most prestigious schools for photography at the island “Gotland,” and moved to New York in 2012 to continue her studies at the International Center of Photography. She graduated in 2013 and is now working on her own long-term photographic art projects. She has received the Helge Ax:son Johnson grant two years in a row, 2012 and 2013, and exhibited at galleries such as Visby Art Museum, Photoville and Greenpoint Gallery. She is represented by Kasher|Potamkin Gallery in Chelsea, New York.

Related links

Isabella Stahl

 

 

Happy Birthday Paul


Speaking of Paul and Birthdays… Happy Birthday to my dear husband Paul Basile! He is thousands of miles away in Alaska today. Luckily I have this little friend to help me celebrate in South Sudan. Photo by Katie Basile @basilekatie for @burndiary

Old Fangak


Hello @burndiary followers. I am @basilekatie and this week I am posting from Old Fangak in South Sudan. Old Fangak is a town occupied by people from the Nuer tribe. Thousands of people from the Nuer tribe have been murdered at the hands of soldiers over the past 14-months.Though it is landlocked, Old Fangak is only accessible by boat and plane which makes it a relatively secure place for those whom had to flee. There are now an estimated 25,000 displaced people living in Old Fangak.Follow along to see and read the stories of the survivors and internally displaced.Here is Paul. He was born two-days-ago in a round mud house, or tukel, which his family borrowed from relatives after fleeing their home in Phom when soldiers attacked.

igor posner – cargo

Hover over the image for navigation and full screen controls

 

EPF 2014 – SHORTLIST

Igor Posner

Cargo

play this essay

 

Whether anyone is watching or not, migration is a lingering leap into the void. Collision of social with personal, empathy with intellection, this experience is often not misunderstood, it is rather unrecognized – as languages we’ve vaguely heard at some point in our lives, or weather and distances expressed in unaccustomed units of measure that can be assimilated, yet only half-rhymed.
Defining a photographic project in a few concise words is as difficult of a task as editing the project and shaping it into something of meaning and consequence. It is nonetheless important at some point to give the project some form to help shape its further direction and needs.
Primary intent of this project, titled Cargo, is to explore the theme of migration, its social, psychological, and immemorial nature from the standpoint of personal experience of being an immigrant, which is often comprised of the eluded synthesis of immemorial and recollected, that goes beyond describing community of immigrants, or enumerating its picturesque or depressing features and analyzing for which reasons community or people that moved there from one place are comfortable. It is, instead, a visual portrait of a community of memory and image.
The project is constructed in the form of short, often fragmented stories mapping the experience and exploring its various themes: language and culture and their adaptation, interaction of history and fiction, generational relationships, poetics of space, desire to find some lost incarnation of what was once familiar, and more.
Cargo’s stories and characters are based in communities of immigrants from Russia and former Soviet Union, which represent the author’s background. The stories, however, are not limited or intended to represent only one single community experience. It seeks to paint a broader picture of the immigrant common experiences.

 

Bio

Born in St. Petersburg (Leningrad). Igor moved to California in the early 90s. He studied biology at the University of California Los Angeles, where he first started to take pictures and experiment in the darkroom.
Initial infatuation with picture taking led Igor to explore the silent and haunting experience of photographing the streets and shelter-hotels of Skid Row area in Los Angeles and brothels in Tijuana. The first series of images “No Such Records” savors the strange solitude of the enigmatic region between California and Mexico; amid the streets, bars, night shelter hotels, and disappearing night figures.
After 14 years, Igor returned to St. Petersburg in 2006, taking up photography full time, which led to a book project “Second Thoughts”.
At present, Igor is based in New York and working on a long term project exploring migration and gradual disappearance of neighborhoods based on Russian immigrant community in North America.
He joined Prospekt agency in 2011.

Related links

Igor Posner

 

 

Moullie Point


This is my final post on @burndiary this time round.A woman waits for her family of runners in the cool Atlantic fog in Moullie Point.Singing out, Barry Christianson @thesestreetsza #shootingcapetown #fog