Author Archive for burn magazine

Emerging Photographer Fund 2019 – call for submissions

 

Emerging Photographer Fund 2019 – call for submissions

 

 

The Emerging Photographer Fund 2019 is now open for submissions!

This year we are proud to offer two awards: the Emerging Photographer Grant for $10,000 and the Fujifilm Young Talent Award (25 or under) for $10,000. For more information, follow the link below.

 

Enter here

 

The deadline for entry is June 5th, 2019 (6pm PST)

 

 

 

Burn Magazine revolves around the EPF. It is our most important curatorial contribution to the oftentimes chaotic landscape of photography today. By choosing a jury whose lifetimes have been spent in looking at photographs and making photographs, we try to give our Burn readers a distilled version of the best work of all that flows before their eyes everyday.

Most importantly our mission is to give recognition to the finest emerging authors out there and to provide some funding to at least a few to keep going and to continue making a mark. With the support of the non-profit Magnum Foundation, $10,000 is given to the recipient of EPF to move forward in their work. Our previous winners prove this is not in vain.

In addition, Fujifilm is partnering with us to offer an award, open to all photographers who are 25 or younger at the time of the deadline. All you need to do is enter into the EPF… and if you’re 25 or younger, you’ll be automatically eligible for the Fujifilm Young Talent Award. Fujifilm offers a cash prize of $10,000 to the winner.

Of course we are immensely proud of this partnership… and hope in this way we can give back to the young emerging ones amongst us… who just might need it more than we can ever imagine.

 

 

 

 

Previous EPF Winners

 

The 2008 Emerging Photographer Fund grant was awarded to Sean Gallagher for his essay on the environmental Desertification of China.

The 2009 Emerging Photographer Fund grant was awarded to Alejandro Chaskielberg for his 8×10 format essay on the Parana River Delta ‘The High Tide’.

The 2010 Emerging Photographer Fund grant was awarded to Davide Monteleone for his essay ‘Northern Caucasus’.

The 2011 Emerging Photographer Fund grant was awarded to Irina Werning for her essay ‘Back to the Future’.

In 2012 three Emerging Photographer Fund grants were awarded: one major to Matt Lutton for his essay ‘Only Unity’ and two minors to Giovanni Cocco for his essay ‘Monia’ and to Simona Ghizzoni for her essay ‘Afterdark’.

In 2013 four Emerging Photographer Fund grants were awarded: one major to Diana Markosian for her essay ‘My Father The Stranger’ and three minors to: Iveta Vaivode for her essay ‘Somewhere on Disappearing Path’, Oksana Yushko for her essay ‘Balklava: The Lost History’ and Maciej Pisuk for his essay ‘Under The Skin; Photographs From Brzeska Street’.

In 2014 two Emerging Photographer Fund grants were awarded: one major to Alessandro Penso for his essay ‘Lost Generation’ and one minor to: Birte Kaufmann for her essay ‘The Travelers’.

In 2015 the Emerging Photographer Fund was awarded to Danila Tkachenko for ‘Restricted Areas’, and the Fujifilm Young Talent Award to Sofia Valiente for ‘Miracle Village’.

In 2016 the Emerging Photographer Fund was awarded to Annie Flanagan for ‘Deafening Sound’, and the Fujifilm Young Talent Award to Aleksander Raczynski for ‘Views’

In 2017 the Emerging Photographer Fund was awarded to Antoine Bruy for ‘Outback Mythologies’, and the Fujifilm Young Talent Award to Aleksey Kondratyev for ‘Ice Fishers’

 

Entries are now open

 

The Emerging Photographer Fund 2019 is now open for submissions!

The deadline for entry is June 5th, 2019 (6pm PST)

– Enter here –

 

 

Editor’s note:

Many thanks especially to my EPF team Anton Kusters, Diego Orlando, and Mallory Bracken. First off, they must deal with me!! Never easy. In all seriousness, they all show amazing dedication to the spirit of doing something which just feels good. To provide a platform for the up and coming.

 

Special thanks to Susan Meiselas of the Magnum Foundation. Nobody on the planet is more dedicated to allowing new talent to develop.

 

Special thanks also to Michael Loyd Young, EPF funder and BURN Magazine board member.

 

 

 

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A heart felt thank you also to Fujifilm for the Fujifilm Young Talent Award… making it possible for the EPF to keep focus on the future generations, the young ones, the ones with a vision already making a mark now… and just might make another jump soon…

 

-dah-

 

The Emerging Photographer Fund was created and is directed by David Alan Harvey,
curated and produced by Anton Kusters & Diego Orlando.

Yiota Tsokou – The Distance

Yiota Tsokou

The Distance

I don’t need you – please stay.

I keep at arm’s length, as though I were a ghost stuck between two worlds. I linger in this moment and time is frozen. I have overanalyzed reality – cut it into little pieces – and now everything lies shattered; deformed.

 

 

The Distance story deals with that very state; how one’s experience of the human condition leaves its mark. It is a story which explores both closeness and togetherness, leaving plenty of room for definitions.

 

 

 

Short Bio

Yiota Tsokou is a Greece-based self-taught photographer. Her interest in photography sparked in 2014, when she started experimenting with analog photography. Her work has been published in a number of publications such as Agitate (Australia, October 2015), Photoklassik (Germany, September 2016), Adore Noir Magazine (Canada, October 2017), Click Magazine (Italy, December 2017), Photographize (USA, February 2018).

 

Related Links

bulbphotos.eu.com/yiota-tsokou

the distance – video 

 

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The Emerging Photographer Fund is supported by generous donors to the Magnum Foundation

Magnum Foundation

Jake Borden – In Ruins – Displaced Georgians in Tbilisi

Jake Borden

In Ruins – Displaced Georgians in Tbilisi

[ FUJIFILM / YOUNG TALENT AWARD 2018 SHORTLIST ]

On the outskirts of Georgia’s capital, Tblisi, an abandoned military hospital from the bygone Soviet era serves as a refuge to some one hundred and fifty families unable to find jobs and affordable housing. Tweny-five years after the fall of the Soviet Unions, the occupants represent a fraction of the nearly quarter million internally displaced people inside Georgia, who in 1993 were forced from their homes during government clashes with Russian backed separatists in Abkhazia and South Ossetia.

 

 

Local government pays little attention to the building, and when they do it’s to cut off electricity and water which residents have diverted through a jerry-rigged lattice of wires and pipes. Two decades after the conflict, many hold out hope that they will one day be able to return to their homeland and reunite with long lost family members.

 

 

 

Short Bio

Jake Borden is an American photojournalist based in Beirut, Lebanon. In 2015, Borden began assisting VII founder and National Geographic photographer John Stanmeyer, managing his extensive archive in the Berkshires and assisting him while abroad. Inspired by Stanmeyer, Borden set out to tell stories of that had the possibility for social impact at home and abroad. He is currently working on a longterm project in Lebanon exploring the lasting social impacts of conflict through the VII Masterclass program, and has had work published by international news outlets such as the BBC and Vice News.

 

Related Links

jakeborden.com

 

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The Fujifilm/Young Talent Award is supported by Fujifilm

 

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Anneke Paterson – Growing Pains

Anneke Paterson

Growing Pains

[ FUJIFILM / YOUNG TALENT AWARD 2018 SHORTLIST ]

These are the things I wish to keep, though I know I can’t. My generation is saying goodbye to its favorite places, even entire neighborhoods with cultural significance; the remnants of our childhoods are an Austin that seems too far gone. Some say that these changes which are overtaking our city, though they harm some, will benefit many. We’re not so sure: the changes are certainly capturing us all, though not equally. This trajectory is comparable to my own precipice of adulthood, which just as unsettled and dubious, unrelentingly pushes me onward. The boom is stretching us thin and wedging and an even deeper divide in a city whose infrastructures are deeply rooted in segregation; the city itself was designed for those who wished for it to be divided: us apart from them.

Now, areas of Austin which were designated for people of color are being overtaken by developers and corporations looking to exploit cheaper and vulnerable properties and persons. In my mid-twenties, I witnessing the effects of Austin’s historical segregation: historically Black and Latino neighborhoods are being stipped of their cultural and sentimental value just as I’m parting ways with my childhood and watching their physical spaces be replaced with novelty.

Though I am a native Austinite, I was naive to believe in the myth of the exceptionality of Austin, for which many others know as well: The Live Music Capital of the World, the place built on creatives and music and small-town sentiments. This identity does not speak for us all. Austin must confront its changing identity just as I must confront mine, what I thought of myself, of the city, no longer holds true, for better and for worse. My work explains my coming of age, expanding identity, and their parallel with the changing scape of this American city. These are friends, ex-lovers, strangers, all Austinites, connected by the experience of our remaining care-free days as adulthood and inescapable change looms.

Short Bio

Born and raised in Austin, Texas, Anneke Paterson is an early career photographer of humanity with a distinct interest in youth culture. In her work, Anneke considers the dynamics between what and who she photographs and her role as the image creator. Currently, she is focusing on personal narratives as a way of establishing a better understanding of the adapting world around her. Her photographic essay, Bitten by the Moon, which examined access to surgical healthcare for those with physical malformations or conditions in El Salvador, was published by Burn Magazine in 2017. Other works have been published by National Geographic Travel and National Geographic Books. Anneke is an undergraduate student of cultural anthropology at Texas State University, with a desire that this degree will serve her photographic perspective and guide narratives which include sensitive topics, such as the effects of urban development. Anneke is a member of The Photographic Museum of Humanity and Women Photo

 

Related Links

annekepaterson.com

 

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The Fujifilm/Young Talent Award is supported by Fujifilm

 

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Abhishek Basu – The Rum Diary

Abhishek Basu

The Rum Diary

[ EPF 2018 SHORTLIST ]

The Rum Diary adopts the tone of a scrapbook whose dog-eared pages are found yellowing inside the baggy jeans pocket of many a photographer searching for their decisive moments. How long do you hold out your fishing rod in still water without conjuring up images of smoked salmon in your head at the slightest tug on the string (read: stirring of the heart)? Does the reality of the common carp you finally catch by dusk, not satisfy the tastebuds of the mind which have already feasted on the grilled slivers of the hyper-real?

 

It is out of this desire to relish life to its optimum best is borne a journey traced by this series of images. With the name providing an entry point into Thompson’s fictional universe, characters in the diary too are captured as at once flawed, haphazard, crooked and stumbling through life as they are extraordinary, silver-screened, charismatic and surreal. Taking from phrase ‘killing your darlings’ often used by writers, the diary delves into the voyeuristic tendencies that might have led to their creation in the first place. Till how far do I allow my intrusion to lead me by the hand? Does she ask me out for a dance? Do I buy her a drink? The quick-sand-like subjectivity of my darlingsmakes it difficult for me refrain from sinking. They say one is always a toe-dip away from being sucked in.

 

 

This tension between the two worlds weaves dialogues of ‘to dip or not to dip’ with every flip of the diary’s pages. This slippery slope of stance is traversed through questions of belonging, love, intimacy and desire, till before you know it your darling kills you.

Breathing life into memory is all the option one is left with to cling onto. Nostalgia is personified. A photographer’s dilemma is eulogised.

But after all, the heart longs to thump. And so begins again a plunge into the unknown or the casting of the fishing rod back into the murky waters of the pond.

 

Short Bio

Abhishek was born in 1990 in Tatanagar, Jharkhand, India . He uses the photographic medium within a wide range of reasons such as comprehending his own anxieties, to bridging social barriers. This is the main topic of discussion in his ongoing and work-in-progress book, The Rum Diary. In 2017, he received a scholarship from Burn Magazine to attend a workshop in Puerto Rico with Magnum photographer David Alan Harvey. Abhishek is a freelance photographer, and he works for various publishing houses on experimental story telling techniques, book design, curation and multimedia. Taking to Abbas’s advice, “buy a pair of shoes and fall in love with it”, Abhishek’s subjects span the wide variety of where life and his understanding of it has taken him. One can say that the photographer in him attempts to make the most out of the power of his lens every day.

 

Related Links

abhishek.photoshelter.com

 

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The Emerging Photographer Fund is supported by generous donors to the Magnum Foundation

Magnum Foundation

Fatima Abreu Ferreira – How to disappear completely

Fatima Abreu Ferreira

How to disappear completely

[ EPF 2018 SHORTLIST ]

How to disappear completely is a work of struggle, obsession and complete hallucination.
I´ve worked as a psychologist for over a decade. I had a steady job, a long-time boyfriend and solid expectations about my future: I would marry, have kids, continue to help other people and get older next to my loved ones.
But, around my 33rd birthday something changed. My partner’s father died the day after my birthday due to lung cancer and our entire world collapsed. The loss made me rethink my entire life and I decided to change my path.
A month after my 33rd birthday I had quit my job and the life I had to return to my childhood home to study and work on photography.

 

 

Life has it was had stopped being, and this was a scary notion but not as scary as what came afterwards.
Upon my return, I realized how my family had changed: my nephews grew up, my sisters turned into two estranged women and my mother shrank her soul into her old age. We had all started to loose ourselves after my father passing 10 years before but now, we had no understanding of each other nor of ourselves.
I realized I had also lost track of my friends as they had grown into new families and goals that I didn’t have and my hometown morphed into such a senseless touristic destination that I felt that I could only photograph the surroundings or at night.

 

 

I felt displaced. A strange body on a foreign dimension, trying to find myself, lost between the one I should become and the person I used to be. All my memories had lost their meaning so I began trying to register them again. I photographed my daily life, my family, my friends, I went back to my family photo albums and one thing I´ve discovered is that for me, memory is only relevant as it relates to the present. So, instead of trying to be realistic about what I remembered, I morphed these memories into my present nightmarish sense of self. My displacement. My dream within a dream.

 

Short Bio

Fatima Abreu Ferreira is a Portuguese photographer, born in Guarda, in 1983. In 1988 she moved to the north of the country and became a psychologist. In 2016 Fatima abandoned psychology to work and study photography.
Fatima is mainly a self-taught photographer but has always developed training and workshops with her main influences such as Anders Petersen and Jacob Aue Sobol. In 2018 she completed the Artistic Photography Master at IPCI and started an independent publishing house called Red String. She has multiple publications and has exhibited nationally and internationally. Fatima’s body of work has a strong humanistic view as a way of approaching life in both public and private contexts and her aesthetics is predominantly black and white with a dark and grainy style providing an intense, visceral and dramatic view of the subject.

 

Related Links

www.fatimaabreuferreira.com

 

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The Emerging Photographer Fund is supported by generous donors to the Magnum Foundation

Magnum Foundation

Liza Ambrossio – The rage of devotion – La ira de la devoción

Liza Ambrossio

The rage of devotion – La ira de la devoción

[ FUJIFILM / YOUNG TALENT AWARD 2018 FINALIST ]

Some time ago I decided to change my life in the most extraordinary way possible. I looked in and without intending it I remembered the phrase with which my mother said goodbye the last time I saw her at sixteen years old – “I wish you well, and believe me I hope you’ll become strong and brave, so you can be merciless when the time comes to destroy your body and crush your soul the next time we see each other”- After an overwhelming emotional breakdown, I started this series of images intermingling with pictorial canvases and photographs of my family archive to impel the observer to immerse themselves in my psychology.

 

 

I stumble, but in the same way freeing myself, finding their lascivious looks, my fear of touch and the instinctive repulsion that represents for me the concept of “family”. In “The rage of devotion” I discover that although I look, I don’t want to see, because what lives inside me, looks and it is completely monstrous.

I am a being led by demons. After leaving home at sixteen I decided never to return to the family home, but I needed a powerful symbolic connection with my Mother. To acquire the old photo file that I included in my project, I spoke with the housekeeper of my mother’s house to steal the images of the old family albums while I paid for them during my student years between high school and university.

 

 

All my night images are photographed in the early hours when I worked for the police press or “Mexican red note” when I had just left my mother’s house. In them I discovered that all the chaos that was inside me was also the trace of the chaos that it was outside of me. In my country there is a war that is not talked about, and I started to face a war against the machismo exercised by the women of my family towards me. As for medical images or strange diseases such as -double iris in the eye-, are the consequence of my obsession with medicine and my almost four years of dedication to a specialist doctor of rare diseases.

 

 

Short Bio

Liza Ambrossio is a young Mexican artist based in Madrid, Spain. Her body of work combines photographs of macabre archive with cryptic paintings, performance, intervention, installations, videos, psychology, lucid nightmares, science fiction, ero-guro and witchcraft that come together in free association. Winner of the first prize in the Voies Off Award 2018 of Les Rencontres de la Photographie, Arles, France, as well as the FNAC New Talent Award, 2018. Liza is the invice of the scholarship portfolio review in the FotoFest of Houston 2018 and the 6th Edition of the (TAI) Photography Talent Grant. In 2017, she won the Discoveries scholarship of the PHotoESPAÑA festival and La Fabrica and the ‘Luz del Norte prize’ in Monterrey, México. Currently, she is nominated for the award Plat(t)form of the Fotomuseum Winterthur. She has been selected for New Visions 2018 in the Cortona On The Move festival, Italy and she had the first honorific mention for the Emerging Prize within the ‘Encontros Da Image festival’, Portugal 2018. In 2018, she presented her first photobook “The rage of devotion”.

 

Related Links

lizaambrossio.com

 

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The Fujifilm/Young Talent Award is supported by Fujifilm

 

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Annalisa Natali Murri – A Respectable Family (The Murri’s Affair)

Annalisa Natali Murri

A Respectable Family (The Murri’s Affair)

[ EPF 2018 FINALIST ]

This project comes out from my urge to put back together the pieces of an infamous story that has accompanied my family since September 2nd, 1902. That day Linda Murri, daughter of my great-grandfather, had her husband, count Bonmartini, stabbed to death in his house in Bologna. For this crime my great-grandfather Tullio, Linda’s brother, was unjustly accused and served a sentence several years in prison, marking the life of my family forever. This ongoing project, centered in identity, intimacy and memory, roots itself in my own family archives, official documents and other family heirlooms, and aims to preserve the thread between past and present: my wish is to recover connections within my own family heritage, inquiring about memory and how the events experienced by my ancestors have been affecting subsequent family generations, including myself.

 

 

Short Bio

Annalisa Natali Murri, freelance photographer, approached for the first time to photography at age 27, while attending Architectural and Urban Photography School in Valencia (Spain). After completing her studies in engineering, soon she began to alternate her work to photography, focusing on personal research works and documentary projects, mainly inspired by social issues and their psychological consequences.

In 2014 she was selected as an attendee for LOOKbetween mentorship program and in 2015 she was named one of the 30 emerging photographers to watch at PDN’s 30.

Her works have been awarded and highlighted in several international contests and awards, including 70th and 71st POYi, Sony World Photography Award, Burnmagazine Emerging Photographer Fund, Catchlight’s Activist Awards and PHM Women Photographers Grant.

 

Related Links

annalisanatalimurri.com

 

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The Emerging Photographer Fund is supported by generous donors to the Magnum Foundation

Magnum Foundation

Rosie Brock – And Ever Shall Be

Rosie Brock

And Ever Shall Be

[ FUJIFILM / YOUNG TALENT AWARD 2018 FINALIST ]

My childhood spent in the American South and the regionally specific encounters I had there served as the key motivation for this body of work. After spending three years in art school in New York City, I felt compelled to return to the area of the country where I had spent my formative years. Amidst the oppressive July air, I sought out individuals and scenes reminiscent of my own youth. The resulting visual narrative focuses on the nuanced relationship between the region’s deep-seated mythicism and its current socioeconomic reality. This confluence of past and present is furthered articulated by the recurring motif of the archetypal county fair.

 

 

Short Bio

Rosie Brock (b. 1995) recently received a BFA in Photography & Video from the School of Visual Arts and was a student winner in the PDN Photo Annual 2018. Born in South Carolina and raised in both Gulf Coast Florida and Virginia, she is heavily inspired by her childhood spent in the American South. Brock currently resides in Virginia.

 

Related Links

www.rosie-brock.com

 

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The Fujifilm/Young Talent Award is supported by Fujifilm

 

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Tommaso Protti – Terra Vermelha

Tommaso Protti

Terra Vermelha

[ EPF 2018 FINALIST ]

The Amazon Rainforest is often referred to as the ‘Lungs of our Planet,’ still imagined as the unspoiled home of isolated, disconnected tribes. A thick, green stain on the map — the world’s largest — laid there by the hand of God, with no sign of man’s.

From up close though, it’s way more than woods, mines and dams: cities have grown out of the jungle, into a green favela. Fields are burning, and the dark, steady stream of the Amazon river a safe conduct for cocaine. The riverbanks are littered with trash, and bodies.

“Terra Vermelha,” which means red earth, is essentially a portrait of the modern day Brazilian Amazon that explores and illustrates the intersecting social and environmental crises of the region, in the states of Pará, Amazonas, Maranhao, Rondonia and Roraima.

 

 

In recent years, environmental destruction, rural and urban violence have reached unprecedented heights in the region.

The urban centres have become amongst the most violent in the world, the result of rapid and uncontrolled urban expansion that continue to grow and drug wars from increased cocaine production while Amazon pirates stalk the river robbing and killing as well as migrants brought by the crisis in neighbouring Venezeula and economic migrants to work on mega projects.

The region is the deadliest in the world for land rights, environmental and Indigenous activists who are terrorized by land grabbers and violent extractive gangs in a violent grab for the regions vast natural resources. Poverty stricken illegal wildcat miners and timber cutters.

 

 

Deforestation, unregulated development, pollution, crime. All of these scenarios are driven by the same forces; poverty, weak institutions, corruption and savage self-interest. More than in other places, in the Amazon region it becomes clear that land is worth more than human life. And on the path towards the destruction of the planet, the first and closest step for mankind is still its own annihilation.

 

Short Bio

Tommaso Protti is an Italian photographer based in São Paulo, Brazil. He started his photographic career in 2011 after graduating in Political Science and International Relations. Since then, he has devoted himself on creating his own long-term projects. His works were exhibited internationally in The Royal Albert Hall (London), Greenwich Heritage Centre (Woolwich, UK), Benaki Museum (Athens), MACRO Museum of Contemporary Arts (Rome), 10b Photography Gallery (Rome), Fotoleggendo (Rome), Les Recontres d’Arles (France), Prix Bayeux-Calvados des Correspondants de Guerre festival (France), Belfast Photo (Ireland), C40 Mayors Summit (Mexico City), UN COP22 (Marrakesh, Marocco), PARTE Contemporary Art Fair (São Paulo, Brazil). Tommaso’s work was published in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Time, National Geographic, The New Yorker, The Guardian, The Independent, Le Monde, Corriere della Sera, etc.

 

Related Links

tommasoprotti.com

 

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The Emerging Photographer Fund is supported by generous donors to the Magnum Foundation

Magnum Foundation