Loulou d’Aki – Make a Wish

20-year old Maryam Sadeghi studies Illustration at the Academy of Art in Tehran and makes hand made jewelry which is sold in Texas. Maryam finds her country full of tiring restrictions and sadness is often bored:she is determined to emigrate to America once she finishes her studies. When asked about her future dreams and aspirations she says: “ I do not have many wishes because I got everything I wanted, but many little wishes do exist. One is to meet the actor Mehran Modir -  the only one who makes us laugh in this hard situation in Iran…My last wish, and many people are afraid of it - is death. I came to this egoistic world where everybody think about themselves…I hope that when I die, I shall find the world that I was always looking for. ”

Loulou d’Aki

Make a Wish

[ EPF 2016 FINALIST ]

“This is just a dream, but fortunately dreams do come true.” Cyrus P., 15, Tehran, Iran It’s a rainy November morning in Gaza and a truce has just been announced after 8 days of fighting. A young man stands in the rubbles of what is left of his home, destroyed in an air strike just an hour before the war ended. His name is Ahmed, he is 18 years old, the son of a fisherman. He wants to live in peace and go to college but we are in the Gaza strip and dreams have their limits here, you often have the feeling of being caught up in a game where you always turn out the looser.

MAKE A WISH is a photo essay looking at the hopes and dreams of youth, aiming to create a testimony of our time. It’s inspired by the fact that youth should be the age of infinite possibilities. Most of the MAKE A WISH project has been shot in the Middle East and in situations linked to the Arab Spring revolution or in conflict zones where youth too often is derived of it’s right to be young.

The Arab Spring catapulted a taste of freedom in people across a region so long affected by dictators, Western foreign policies gone awry and poor social development. Spring turned to summer, fall and winter, months turned to years and the original revolution into something much different from the ideals of freedom shouted at squares across the region. When I set out to work on this project, I did so with the assumption that youth is an age of infinite possibility when aspiration is not yet conditioned by experience. As the work evolved I began to understand until which extent aspirations are conditioned by the society in which we live and the circumstances under which we grow up.

Make a Wish is shot in medium format negative with a Hasselblad camera. For each portrait I ask the person to write down his or her dream in my notebook. Together, the text and the pictures become a testimony of youth of our time.

 

 

Short Bio

Loulou d’Aki is a photographer born and raised on the Swedish seaside. Her main interest lies in how human beings are affected by the society in which they live and the influence of visible or invisible borders. Alongside commissioned work and freelance editorials Lou focuses on various long term projects such as: MAKE A WISH a photo essay looking at the hopes and dreams of youngsters across the globe. CITY HEADACHE the post-war generation’s way of handling the Iranian dress code in its own way within a society where the urban recollection of war and martyrdom is an unevitable and constant factor. Lou’s work has been exhibited at Prix Bayeux Calvados des correspondents de guerre, Noorderlicht Photofestival, Singapore Photofestival, The Other hundred, Foto Leggendo, Mois de la photo, Portraet nu!… Some of her clients include Le Monde, die Zeit, New York Times, TIMES, NY Magazine, Dagens Nyheter, Internazionale, National Geographic Proof, Unicef, New Yorker etc.

 

Related Links

Loulou d’Aki

Aleksander Raczynski – Views

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Aleksander Raczynski

Views

[ FUJIFILM/YOUNG TALENT AWARD 2016 WINNER ]

These images are part of longer series, taken in different places. They help me to understand the world and myself. My life and my photography are both a confrontation with my emotions, and make me feel closer to my soul and to the nature. I find it very helpful as what scares me the most is the lack of emotions.

 

Short Bio

Aleksander Raczynski was born in Lodz (Poland), and is a student of the National Film School there.

Annie Flanagan – Deafening Sound

Makeup disguises Maria's fractured eye as she prepares to board a train home to Oregon from Williston, North Dakota. Maria moved to Wiliston less than a month prior to seek work in America's Boomtown.  Since the oil boom took off in 2009, domestic violence has quadrupled in Williston, North Dakota.  (Williston, North Dakota / February 2014)

Annie Flanagan

Deafening Sound

[ EPF 2016 WINNER ]

Deafening Sound examines the deep roots of gendered violence and rape culture in American society. Presently, it combines three documentary projects, a portrait series and a collection of artifacts. It is structured so that each chapter examines different ways systematic gendered violence persists in America. It aims to reduce the stigma of gendered violence, address the complicated cycle of abuse and elevate consciousness about the prevalence of rape culture.

This project began when my best friend, Hannah, left her abusive boyfriend. In this relationship she experienced long-term exposure to emotional trauma, where she had little control and there was no hope of escape. This chapter (We Grew Up With Gum In Our Hair) and the accompanying video (Love, Hannah) focus on the correlation between domestic violence and PTSD.

In 2012, I began photographing with two sixteen year old best friends, Nekqua and Brittney, in Syracuse, New York. Months into this project both girls experienced sexual assault, in different experiences on the same day. This chapter (Hey, Best Friend!) works to understand the struggles young women must overcome in dealing with sexual assault.

Since 2013, I have worked closely with a women’s shelter in Williston, North Dakota. This chapter (Sweet Crude) follows survivors of intimate partner violence and sexual assault as they seek safety and support.

I am constantly working to further my investigation of this epidemic and visually address issues of gendered violence and representations of women in American society. If awarded the EPF, I will use a portion of the funding to continue working on and complete a film that follows Nekqua before, directly after and years after her assault. Additionally, I will photograph rural domestic violence in Alaska, where the rate of reported rape is three times the national average. If needed, I will shift to photograph rural domestic violence in the Dakotas, where I already have connections.

 

 

Short Bio

I picked up a camera in the 7th grade and it has since been the primary way in which I make sense of the world. I have had love affairs with other passions, but it has remained the only constant in my life.

I grew up in Washington, D.C. with amazing parents and three brothers and the constant, insane flux of friends and family. I have lived all over the United States; recently, I have mostly lived out of my car while working on projects. I am not used to having those quite moments in life, which I suppose is one reason I like to find those moments with photography.

My work focuses in American society and explores gender, mental health and friendship within the documentary framework. I tend to begin projects that are informed by experiences I have, or those close to me have, and then I look at how those expereinces exist on a large level and in different situations.

Right now, I live in New Orleans and try to keep life equal parts make believe and harsh realities.

Related Links

Annie Flanagan

EPF 2016 – The Winners

 

The Emerging Photographer Fund 2016

 

Makeup disguises Maria's fractured eye as she prepares to board a train home to Oregon from Williston, North Dakota. Maria moved to Wiliston less than a month prior to seek work in America's Boomtown.  Since the oil boom took off in 2009, domestic violence has quadrupled in Williston, North Dakota.  (Williston, North Dakota / February 2014)

Annie Flanagan

Deafening Sound

EPF 2016 WINNER – $10,000

Deafening Sound examines the deep roots of gendered violence and rape culture in American society. Presently, it combines three documentary projects, a portrait series and a collection of artifacts. It is structured so that each chapter examines different ways systematic gendered violence persists in America. It aims to reduce the stigma of gendered violence, address the complicated cycle of abuse and elevate consciousness about the prevalence of rape culture.

 

 

 

The EPF FujiFilm/Young Talent Award 2016

 

61502057469-Media-05

Aleksander Raczynski

Views

FUJIFILM/YOUNG TALENT AWARD 2016 WINNER – $5,000 + FujiFilm camera

 

 

FUJIFULM/YOUNG TALENT AWARD 2016 Runners up:

 

Sara Zanella – FujiFilm camera

Amr Dabees – FujiFilm camera

Drew Nikonowicz – FujiFilm camera

Bradley Pearce – FujiFilm camera

 

 

EPF 2016 FINALISTS

 

(in alphabetical order)

Aji Susanto Anom
Giovanni Cocco
Loulou d’Aki
Laura El Tantawy
Annie Flanagan
Dominika Gesicka
Amnon Gutman

 

 

FUJIFILM/YOUNG TALENT AWARD 2016 FINALISTS

 

(in alphabetical order)

Amr Dabees
Igor Elukov
Drew Nikonowicz
Bradley Pearce
Aleksander Raczynski
Micha Siarek
Sara Zanella

 

 

The full essays of the winners and finalists will be published here on BURN over the next few weeks,
as well as a selection of the shortlisted essays. Stay tuned!

 

 

 

EPF 2016 JUDGES

 

(in alphabetical order)

Monica Allende | Photo Editor & Cultural Producer, Screen

Enrico Bossan | Editorial Director, Fabrica

Yumi Goto | Curator, Reminders Photography Stronghold

Jacob Aue Sobol | Photographer, Magnum

Maggie Steber | Photographer, National Geographic

 

 

Judges’ statement:

 

In her project, Annie Flanagan addresses the ages-old tragedy of domestic abuse and rape in a manner that brings her subjects onto a contemporary stage with an updated photographic style and point of view. Her choice of subjects and visual approach make a bold statement in focusing on this continuing war on women from the beginning of time. The work is subtle but powerful. Particularly because this is an ongoing issue that in some societies is on the rise, it is important to find a way to speak to new generations with new kinds of images. In approaching her project in chapters, she manages to focus but also produce a broader brushstroke of ideas. We want to mention the photographer’s project text was well-done, articulate, informative and set the stage for her photographs.

 

In Aleksander Raczynski’s project he casts himself as the main character in a play in search of something, someone who feels a full tilt of emotions and reactions to what he sees and photographs and who he meets. His long series of photographs taken in many different places help him, he says, to understand the world and thus himself. He wanders, with no particular idea in mind, his life and photography a constant confrontation with his emotions. They jettison him closer to his own soul. In his words: “I find it very helpful as what scares me the most is the lack of emotions in life.” Aleksander’s photographs look like memories of one place or another, a memory that might be drawn from childhood, a place where something happened to him, odd and familiar scenes and moments that act as his visual autobiography.

 

 

Previous EPF Winners

 

The 2008 Emerging Photographer Fund grant was awarded to
Sean Gallagher for his essay on the environmental Desertification of China.

The 2009 Emerging Photographer Fund grant was awarded to
Alejandro Chaskielberg for his 8×10 format essay on the Parana River Delta ‘The High Tide’.

The 2010 Emerging Photographer Fund grant was awarded to
Davide Monteleone for his essay ‘Northern Caucasus’.

The 2011 Emerging Photographer Fund grant was awarded to
Irina Werning for her essay ‘Back to the Future’.

In 2012 three Emerging Photographer Fund grants were awarded:
one major to Matt Lutton for his essay ‘Only Unity’ and
two minors to Giovanni Cocco for his essay ‘Monia’ and to Simona Ghizzoni for her essay ‘Afterdark’.

In 2013 four Emerging Photographer Fund grants were awarded:
one major to Diana Markosian for her essay ‘My Father The Stranger’ and
three minors to: Iveta Vaivode for her essay ‘Somewhere on Disappearing Path’,
Oksana Yushko for her essay ‘Balklava: The Lost History’ and
Maciej Pisuk for his essay ‘Under The Skin; Photographs From Brzeska Street’.

In 2014 two Emerging Photographer Fund grants were awarded:
one major to Alessandro Penso for his essay ‘Lost Generation’ and
one minor to: Birte Kaufmann for her essay ‘The Travelers’.

In 2015 the Emerging Photographer Fund was awarded to Danila Tkachenko for ‘Restricted Areas’, and
the FujiFil Young Talent Award to Sofia Valiente for ‘Miracle Village’.

 

 

Editor’s note:

 

I cannot express my thanks enough to Maggie, Monica, Yumi, Jacob and Ernesto. They worked together to finely tune their choices, looked at the finalists from every angle and awarded the EPF grants to the photographers they felt most deserving. Of course, once it got down to the finalists, choices became extremely difficult, but that is a given… and they did an admirable job. Thank you.

 

A heart felt thank you also to Fujifilm for making it possible for the EPF to keep focus on the future generations, the young ones, the ones with a vision already making a mark now… and just might make another jump soon…

 

FujiFilm_Basic-Black

 

Burn Magazine revolves around the EPF. Our most important curatorial contribution
to the oftentimes chaotic landscape of photography today. By choosing a jury whose lifetimes have been spent in looking
at photographs and making photographs, we try to give our Burn readers a distilled version of the best work of all that
flows before their eyes everyday.

 

Most importantly our mission is to give recognition to the finest emerging authors out there and to provide some funding to at least
a few to keep going and to continue making a mark. Our previous winners prove this is not in vain.

 

Many thanks especially to my EPF Burn team of Anton Kusters, Diego Orlando, and Francesca Gennari.
First off , they must deal with me!! Never easy. In all seriousness, they all show amazing dedication to the spirit of
doing something which just feels good. To provide a platform for the up and coming.

 

Special thanks to Susan Meiselas of the Magnum Foundation. Nobody on the planet is more dedicated to allowing new talent to develop.
 
Special thanks also to Michael Loyd Young, EPF funder and BURN Magazine board member.

 

-dah-
 


The Emerging Photographer Fund was created and is directed by David Alan Harvey,
and curated by Anton Kusters & Diego Orlando.