nicolas enriquez – the bloodline

FujiFilm/Young Talent Award – 2015 Runner Up

 

Hover over the image for navigation and full screen controls

FujiFilm/Young Talent Award 2015 runner up

Nicolas Enriquez

The Bloodline

play this essay

 

The Bloodline is a chapter designated by the gang of the Latin Kings to the State of New York. The Latin Kings is one of the largest and most organized gangs in America with more than 35,000 active members.

This Photo Essay focuses on documenting not only the extreme life conditions for the majority of gang members but also the relation between gang members and society. It explores the intimacy and naivety of teenagers who have been pushed by their economic status, racial or social issues to survive in a hostile environment in one of the most developed cities in the world. It also draws attention to the happiness, unity and respect they show each other and the importance of the family and religion in their lives.

As a Colombian, I am aware of the political and social situations of my country, and am familiar with the culture and their way of life. I am drawn to people who have to live in extreme conditions, and the risks they take to be capable of maintaining their economic status. The stressors behind why they create or get involved in gangs and what their purpose is. In my work I endeavor to show my point of view of social and cultural issues, often referencing South and Latin American urban conflicts such as drug dealing, narco-traffic, gangs and corruption.

I feel inspired by the efforts of these teenagers seeking for a community that understands them and supports them, and how they find the answer to this questions in Gangs, a community that forces them to juggle between being a teenager and surviving in the concrete jungle.

Bio

Nicolas Enriquez was born in the city of Cali-Colombia in 1993, he graduated from the Photojournalism and Documentary Photography program at The International center of Photography in 2014.
His most influential work The Bloodline documenting the Latin Kings gang has helped him to develop an interest in Urban conflict, political and human rights issues.
He currently works as a freelance photographer for the New York Daily News and his work has been published in different media outlets such as The New York Times, American Photography, Getty images, PROOF, NY Daily News.

Nicolas Enriquez

 

 

FujiFilm/EPF Young Talent Award is an additional grant for photographers under 25. Using David Alan Harvey’s words “A heart felt thank you also to FujiFilm for making it possible for the EPF to keep focus on the future generations, the young ones, the ones with a vision already making a mark now… and just might make another jump soon…”

 

 

FujiFilm_Basic-Black

 

 

 

joshua irwandi – asmat: not a blank canvas

FujiFilm/Young Talent Award – 2015 Runner Up

 

Hover over the image for navigation and full screen controls

FujiFilm/Young Talent Award 2015 runner up

Joshua Irwandi

Asmat: Not A Blank Canvas

play this essay

 

Asmat is a tribe of New Guinea discovered not a century ago, notorious for the disappearance of Michael Rockefeller in 1961. However, ever since Indonesia annexed West Papua from The Netherlands, Indonesian government’s transmigration program has brought in an influx of foreigners (from other islands of Indonesia), leading to construction projects, deforestation, and outside influence coming in to Asmat. Consequently, Asmat people are becoming marginalised in their own land. Although Asmat ritual feasts are still taking place with far less frequency, there is religious tension between the Catholic majority of Asmat and Islam brought in by the foreigners. The foreigners own most businesses, which renders the Asmats economically disadvantaged. With increasing number of foreigners coming in per year, by 2030 less than 20% Papuans will cease to exist. Asmat is only one of the many tribes in West Papua.

I was in Asmat in 2013 for 3 weeks, 2 months last year, and recently hired as museum staff at the Asmat Museum in Asmat.

My intention in photographing the Asmat from the very beginning is to raise awareness of what’s happening in Asmat, and to reinvestigate the consequences of development and ‘progress’. We cannot stand oblivious to the change that is rapidly taking place. Change will wipe whatever remains in West Papua. My decision to work in Asmat is because I want to try to engage the Asmat people visually of what’s happening in their land. Asmat is not a blank canvas where outside forces can simply project influence upon them. Asmat have their own way to respond; how, and what their responses are, makes it difficult to predict their future.

Bio

I’m Joshua Irwandi, 23, an Indonesian photographer based in Asmat, West Papua, Indonesia. Starting this year I am working as Museum Staff at the Asmat Museum of Culture of Progress, Agats.

I left Indonesia when I was 16 for high school in Canada (graduated 2010), BA in English Literature at University of Exeter (graduated 2013). While doing BA I spent time mostly on photography; I was photographer at my college paper Exepos’ (nominated Guardian Student Publication of the Year) and designer/photographer for student theatre companies. I interned at the Jakarta Globe in 2011, Kompas in 2011 and 2012, and The Times UK in 2012. I decided to pursue my MA, which began in January 2014, and started photographing Asmat. The photographs from Asmat have won me several workshop opportunities in 2014, namely Adam Broomberg/Oliver Chanarin workshop London, New York Times Portfolio Review NY, Magnum AGM Masterclass NY, Eddie Adams Workshop XVII NY, and VII Photo Masterclass Milan.

Joshua Irwandi

 

 

FujiFilm/EPF Young Talent Award is an additional grant for photographers under 25. Using David Alan Harvey’s words “A heart felt thank you also to FujiFilm for making it possible for the EPF to keep focus on the future generations, the young ones, the ones with a vision already making a mark now… and just might make another jump soon…”

 

 

FujiFilm_Basic-Black

 

 

 

aaron canipe – plateau

FujiFilm/Young Talent Award – 2015 Runner Up

 

Hover over the image for navigation and full screen controls

FujiFilm/Young Talent Award 2015 runner up

Aaron Canipe

Plateau

play this essay

 

Plateau is an exploration of the North Carolina piedmont region. The piedmont, situated between the mountain and coastal region of the state, has long been home to tobacco farms, furniture production, and textile mills, among other industries. This series takes it’s inspiration from North Carolina’s eminent writer Thomas Wolfe and his short story “The Lost Boy”:

“Here,” thought Grover, “here is the Square as it has always been-and papa’s shop, the fire department and the City Hall, the fountain pulsing with its plume, the street cars coming in and halting at the quarter hour, the hardware store on the corner there, the row of old brick buildings oil this side of the street, the people passing and the light that comes and changes and that always will come back again, and everything that comes and goes and changes in the Square, and yet will be the same again.

Plateau is an attempt that finding, in the small towns of the piedmont region, a changelessness and consolation for the state’s rapid growth. Plateau holds on to innocence while looking towards the future and finding the quite global in the local.

Bio

Aaron Canipe earned a BFA in photography in 2012 from the Corcoran College of Art + Design in Washington, D.C. While in D.C, he worked as a photographer and contemporary collection archivist at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. Canipe also co-founded the publishing and design imprint Empty Stretch, which focuses on curating books, zines, and exhibitions highlighting up-and-coming artists and photographers. Canipe is a recent graduate of the MFA in Experimental & Documentary Arts program at Duke University.

Aaron Canipe

 

 

FujiFilm/EPF Young Talent Award is an additional grant for photographers under 25. Using David Alan Harvey’s words “A heart felt thank you also to FujiFilm for making it possible for the EPF to keep focus on the future generations, the young ones, the ones with a vision already making a mark now… and just might make another jump soon…”

 

 

FujiFilm_Basic-Black

 

 

 

mu yang-human brain project (HBP)

FujiFilm/Young Talent Award – 2015 Runner Up

 

Hover over the image for navigation and full screen controls

FujiFilm/Young Talent Award 2015 runner up

Mu Yang

Human Brain Project (HBP)

play this essay

 

The world of ‘victims of brainwave control’ looks like science-fiction; it is full of technology, miracles, machines, and cyborgs. However, unlike cultural movement promoters such as Italian Futurists or Afrofuturists, these ‘victims’ meet with ‘Futurism’ in a different way. For them, those supernatural phenomena are not conceptions, but the reality. Do sciences progress or regress? Are we pursuing virtual or materialistic gains? Do we live in the world of conspiracy theories or in the Garden of Eden? Human Brain Project documents the questioners, a marginalized group of people who claim to have been remotely controlled by satellites via interference with their brainwaves. So far, their behavior has been recognized worldwide as a type of mental disorder. And they work really hard to prove that they are victims of some experiment, not of mental illness.

Photographs here record the bizarre moments of their daily living. Due to the intangible nature of the photographic subjects – activities claimed to have taken place in their minds – prolonged exposure and torchlight are used to mimic the alien world from their perspectives and to approach their mental states. When you walk on the street and see an ordinary building, or hear the screech of a motor vehicle?s brakes, you may suddenly sense an indescribable oddness in the air. And this odd atmosphere happens to be how they feel about the world – building may be surrounded by electromagnetic radiations and spies may hide in the crowd. Human Brain Project expresses no intention to prove or disprove the validity of brainwave control. Rather, I shot in a way similar to documenting certain religious rites and I hope the project paints a heterotopia for the ‘victims’ where we can learn the construction of their ideologies and relevant vocabularies, as well as contemplate on the concept of alienation from a wider angle

 

Bio

Mu Yang, born in Sichuan China, started photography in her college. In the past few years, Mu recorded various marginalized groups of people, who were constantly seeking their sense of belonging yet unable to blend in. Compared to exploring their physical conditions, her artworks put more emphasis on their psychological conundrum in this ever-evolving modern society. Mu?s documentaries are imaginative, most of which are ambiguous images steering between reality and fiction.

Mu Yang

 

 

FujiFilm/EPF Young Talent Award is an additional grant for photographers under 25. Using David Alan Harvey’s words “A heart felt thank you also to FujiFilm for making it possible for the EPF to keep focus on the future generations, the young ones, the ones with a vision already making a mark now… and just might make another jump soon…”

 

 

FujiFilm_Basic-Black

 

 

 

aaron vincent elkaim – where the river runs through

Emerging Photographer Fund – 2015 Honorable Mention

Hover over the image for navigation and full screen controls

EPF 2015 FINALIST

Aaron Vincent Elkaim

Where the River Runs Through

PLAY THIS ESSAY

Plans for what would eventually be called the Belo Monte Dam Complex began in 1975, under the apex of military dictatorship in Brazil. The dam would be built within the Xingu River basin, in the state of Para, home to Brazil’s first indigenous reserve. In 1989 the Kayapo, a warrior tribe who feared for the health of the river that was the centre of their lives, mounted a massive public campaign in opposition of its construction. International financiers soon pulled their support, and the project was shelved.

In 2007, Brazilian President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva announced the Accelerated Growth Program (PAC), the largest investment package to spur economic growth in Brazil in the past 40 years. A cornerstone of this program is the industrialization of the Amazon, which includes the construction of over 60 major Hydroelectric projects over a 15 year period. Belo Monte is at the forefront. The energy generated from these projects will fuel mining initiatives within the Amazon rainforest and power cities thousands of miles away. Now nearing completion, Belo Monte is soon to be the third largest dam in the world, and is expected to displace between 20-40,000 people. On the neighbouring Tapajos River, the Munduruku tribe are fighting to prevent a similar fate; the next mega-dam is already planned.

Hydroelectric dams are touted as clean and renewable sources of energy, but the real impact of large dams is often anything but. Hundreds of square miles of land are flooded and complex river ecosystems permanently transformed. In the Amazon, new infrastructure and population growth opens the forests to increased logging, mining, and agriculture. The end result is the erosion of the Amazon Rainforest and the sacrifice of cultures and communities who depend on the river and forest ecosystems for their way of life.

This is a long-term document of the people of the Amazon Rainforest as they face the challenges of environmental and social transformation.

Bio

Aaron Vincent Elkaim was born in 1981 in Winnipeg, Manitoba, the historic heart of the Canadian Fur Trade where the Red and Assiniboine rivers meet. The river has underscored his work both metaphorically and literally as it concerns moments of human transition in relation to environmental change. Informed by his countries colonialist history, he is drawn to narratives that explore the nuances of history, culture and oppression.

In 2014, Aaron won Gold in the Society of Designers Publication Awards for a commission about the culture of the Iditarod dogsled race in Alaska for the New Yorker Magazine. He was the recipient of the 2012 Daylight Photo Award, Best Personal Essay, Photo District News Annual (2010), and has been recognized by the Oskar Barnak Award (2014), American Photography (26,27,29), Anthropographia (2012), the Magenta Foundation (2013, 2014), and the Lucie Foundation (2010), among others. He work has been exhibited internationally.

Related links

Aaron Vincent Elkaim

 

sofia valiente – miracle village

FujiFilm/Young Talent Award – 2015 Winner

 

Hover over the image for navigation and full screen controls

FujiFilm/Young Talent Award 2015 winner

Sofia Valiente

Miracle Village

play this essay

 

In South Florida, off the coast of Lake Okeechobee, lies a community called Miracle Village. It is home to over 150 sex offenders. The village was founded five years ago by a Christian ministry that seeks to help individuals that have no place to go when they leave prison. The residency restrictions in Florida make it so that sex offenders must live a minimum of 2,500 feet from any school, bus stop, or place where children congregate. In reality, this is a very difficult restriction to abide by. Before coming to the village many of Miracle Village’s residents were homeless.
The village is connected to the small town of Pahokee (population 8,000) and is 40 miles from the medium populated towns of Palm Beach County. The rectangular compound, made up of 52 duplexes, is surrounded by sugarcane and cornfields all around.
The village is almost always at capacity. There is also a screening process for those wanting to become residents, similar to other rental communities. In the village diagnosed pedophiles, violent offenders, rapists or people with a history of drug or alcohol abuse are not accepted.
There are many misconceptions about what a sex crime is. In the state of Florida urinating in public is considered a sex offense. David, another young guy in the village, was in a consensual teenage relationship. He was 18 and she was 16.
Sex offenders must register on an online database that makes public the details of each offender such as their addresses, profile photos and crimes. In American society the label of sex offender is a symbol of terror.
My greatest attempt is to battle the taboo, to be open to seeing each individual as a complex human being. Before they were convicted, each of them thought the same way most people do about sex offenders: “Lock them up and throw away the keys.”
The village is not just a place for the residents to live, but also a place where they are accepted by each other because they all share the same label of “sex offender”.
“Miracle Village” has been produced while at a residency at the photography department of Fabrica in Treviso, Italy.

 

Bio

Sofia Valiente received her BFA in Art from Florida International University in Miami, Florida in 2012. She recently published her first photo book, Miracle Village, while at a one-year residency under the photography department of Fabrica in Treviso, Italy. She is currently based in South Florida, USA where she works simultaneously as a photographer at the Clewiston News and on her personal projects about the people of the Glades.

Sofia is represented by the Daniel Blau Gallery in London/Munich and has been exhibited in London in a semi-solo show, NYC solo show at the AIPAD fair and Miami in various museum group shows. She recently received a World Press Photo award for Miracle Village (1st prize, portraits, stories).

Sofia Valiente

 

 

FujiFilm/EPF Young Talent Award is an additional grant for photographers under 25. Using David Alan Harvey’s words “A heart felt thank you also to FujiFilm for making it possible for the EPF to keep focus on the future generations, the young ones, the ones with a vision already making a mark now… and just might make another jump soon…”

 

 

FujiFilm_Basic-Black

 

 

 

danila tkachenko – restricted areas

Emerging Photographer Fund – 2015 Winner

 

Hover over the image for navigation and full screen controls

EPF 2015 winner

Danila Tkachenko

Restricted Areas

play this essay

 

The project “Restricted Areas” is about the human impulse towards utopia, about our striving for perfection through technological progress.

Humans are always trying to own ever more than they have, this is the source of technical progress. The byproducts of this progress are various commodities as well as the tools of violence in order to hold power over others.

Better, higher, stronger, these ideals often express the main ideology of governments. To achieve these standards, governments are ready to sacrifice almost everything. Meanwhile, the individual is supposed to become a tool for reaching these goals. In exchange, the individual is promised a higher level of comfort.

For “Restricted Areas,” I traveled in search of places which used to hold great importance for the idea of technological progress. These places are now deserted. They have lost their significance, along with their utopian ideology which is now obsolete.

Many of these places were once secret cities, that did not appear on any maps or public records. These places were the sites of forgotten scientific triumphs, abandoned buildings of almost inhuman complexity. The perfect technocratic future that never came.

Any progress comes to its end earlier or later and it can happen for different reasons: nuclear war, economic crisis, natural disaster. What’s interesting for me is to witness what remains after the progress has ground to a halt.

 

Bio

Danila Tkachenko (b. 1989) is a visual artist working with documentary photography.
In 2010 graduated from the Moscow school of photojournalism Izvestia. Was invited to work as press photographer to the newspaper “Evening Moscow”. In 2011 entered the Rodchenko Moscow School of Photography and Multimedia. While studying there he realised the need to work exclusively on the artistic photo projects. In these projects he is talking on the topic of looking for one?s identity in the contemporary society. In 2013 finalised the project Escape about the people who became disillusioned about the contemporary society and decided to live alone far from the civilisation. Project has received recognition through positive reviews of leading printed issues and largest photography awards, including World Press Photo. In 2015 finished working on the series Restricted Areas.

 

Related links

Danila Tkachenko

 

 

 

EPF 2015 – the winners

 

 

 

 

EPF 2015 WINNERS

 

Danila Tkachenko, winner – $10,000

Aaron Vincent Elkaim, honorable mention

 

 

FUJIFULM/YOUNG TALENT AWARD 2015 WINNERS

 

Sofia Valiente, winner – $5,000 + FujiFilm camera

Mu Yang, runner up – FujiFilm camera

Aaron Canipe, runner up – FujiFilm camera

Joshua Irwandi, runner up – FujiFilm camera

Nicolas Enriquez, runner up – FujiFilm camera

 

 

EPF 2015 FINALISTS

 

(in alphabetical order)
Javier Arcenillas
Marta Berens
Annie Flanagan
Alvaro Laiz
Sebastian Liste
Paolo Marchetti
Alexander Mendelevich
Metrography (collective)
Emanuele Occhipinti
Raffaele Petralla
Joao Pina
Pablo Piovano
Sarker Protick
Aaron Vincent Elkaim*
Danila Tkachenko**

 

 

FUJIFILM/YOUNG TALENT AWARD 2015 FINALISTS

 

(in alphabetical order)
Aaron Canipe*
Nicolas Enriquez*
Erin Geideman
Joshua Irwandi*
Acacia Johnson
Mariah Leal Paes
David Molina
Charles Roux
Sofia Valiente**
Mu Yang*

 

 

The full essays of the winners and finalists will be published here on BURN over the next few weeks,
as well as the list of the shortlisted selection. Stay tuned!

 

 

EPF 2014 JUDGES

 

(in alphabetical order)

Bieke Depoorter | Photographer, Magnum

Jim Estrin | Editor, New York Times LENS blog

W.M. Hunt | Collector, Curator, Consultant

Evelien Kunst | Director, NOOR Images

Michael “Nick” Nichols | Photographer, Editor at Large, National Geographic

 

 

Previous EPF Winners

 

The 2008 Emerging Photographer Fund grant was awarded to
Sean Gallagher for his essay on the environmental Desertification of China.

The 2009 Emerging Photographer Fund grant was awarded to
Alejandro Chaskielberg for his 8×10 format essay on the Parana River Delta ‘The High Tide’.

The 2010 Emerging Photographer Fund grant was awarded to
Davide Monteleone for his essay ‘Northern Caucasus’.

The 2011 Emerging Photographer Fund grant was awarded to
Irina Werning for her essay ‘Back to the Future’.

In 2012 three Emerging Photographer Fund grants were awarded:
one major to Matt Lutton for his essay ‘Only Unity’ and
two minors to Giovanni Cocco for his essay ‘Monia’ and to Simona Ghizzoni for her essay ‘Afterdark’.

In 2013 four Emerging Photographer Fund grants were awarded:
one major to Diana Markosian for her essay ‘My Father The Stranger’ and
three minors to: Iveta Vaivode for her essay ‘Somewhere on Disappearing Path’,
Oksana Yushko for her essay ‘Balklava: The Lost History’ and
Maciej Pisuk for his essay ‘Under The Skin; Photographs From Brzeska Street’.

In 2014 two Emerging Photographer Fund grants were awarded:
one major to Alessandro Penso for his essay ‘Lost Generation’ and
one minor to: Birte Kaufmann for her essay ‘The Travelers’.

 

 

Editor’s note:

 

I cannot express my thanks enough to Bieke, Evelien, Jim, Bill and Nick. This very fine EPF jury worked collectively so hard and so thoroughly to finely tune their choices… They thought this through very carefully from every angle to award this grant to the photographers most deserving. Of course once it gets down to the finalists, the choices become extremely difficult. This is where they really went to work. Lots of back and forth discussion and yet consensus reached.

 

A heart felt thank you also to FujiFilm for making it possible for the EPF to keep focus on the future generations, the young ones, the ones with a vision already making a mark now… and just might make another jump soon…

 

FujiFilm_Basic-Black

 

Burn Magazine revolves around the EPF. Our most important curatorial contribution
to the oftentimes chaotic landscape of photography today. By choosing a jury whose lifetimes have been spent in looking
at photographs and making photographs, we try to give our Burn readers a distilled version of the best work of all that
flows before their eyes everyday.

 

Most importantly our mission is to give recognition to the finest emerging authors out there and to provide some funding to at least
a few to keep going and to continue making a mark. Our previous winners prove this is not in vain.

 

Many thanks especially to my EPF Burn team of Anton Kusters, Diego Orlando, and Kaya Berne.
First off , they must deal with me!! Never easy. In all seriousness, they all show amazing dedication to the spirit of
doing something which just feels good. To provide a platform for the up and coming.

 

Special thanks to Susan Meiselas of the Magnum Foundation. Nobody on the planet is more dedicated to allowing new talent to develop.

 

-dah-


The Emerging Photographer Fund was created and is directed by David Alan Harvey,
and curated by Anton Kusters & Diego Orlando, with Kaya Lee Berne.

 

 

 

BurnBooks announces the release of “Tell It Like It Is” by David Alan Harvey

 

 

BurnBooks announces “Tell It Like It Is” by David Alan Harvey

 

 

Tell It Like It Is 
by David Alan Harvey

order

Published by BurnBooks May 2015
Layout and Design: Anton Kusters and Diego Orlando
Image Color Correction: Paolo Lecca
Production: Michael Courvoisier, Kaya Lee Berne
Offset Printing by Grafiche Antiga, Treviso, Italy
15″ x 22.5″
 

Originally shot In 1967 when David Alan Harvey was just 23 and in graduate journalism school in Missouri. Tell It Like It Is was destined to be re-published. It is a photographic slice of another era, and a small piece of one family’s history in the U.S.

 

 

 tellit_buy  
 
 
 
2015 Edition of Tell It Like It Is
76 pages, 46 Black & White Images
Symbol Tatami white 150 gr
Softcover
10.5″ x 15″
 
 
 
 
TellIt_OrderCollectors
  
Collector’s Edition Box Set
Signed silver gelatin print (hand made by the artist)
Ilford Ilfobrom Galerie Fiber-Based Paper, Grade #3, Glossy – 8″ x 10″

2015 edition of Tell It Like It Is
76 pages, Symbol Tatami white 150 gr – 10.5″ x 15″ 

Original 1967 edition (replica) of Tell It Like It Is
36 pages, binding stapled – 6″x 9″

Original 1967 Contact Sheets (replica)
38 sheets – 8.5″ x 11″

Edition of 150.

 
 

 

 

I went a little bit crazy publishing this book. Just like I did the first time. In 1967, Bryan was six months old and I was spending the last $400 of the family money to go buy film. This time around isn’t any different. I am all in on the publication of Tell It Like It Is.

I say this proudly, yet not boastfully.

My pride is based on giving a percentage of profits to the Liggins family and to set up a scholarship for a minority photographer.

We take the self-publishing idea very seriously around here. I spare no expense in the manufacturing of my work. I just want it right. This makes my books a little more expensive, yet if you look closely you will clearly see the value of a well thought out, well designed, well assembled photo book. We do our best to make each of our books a piece of art.

None of this is possible without my colleagues Anton Kusters and Diego Orlando on design and production; Kaya Lee Berne all around producer, darkroom assistant, and make me get shit done woman, Michael Courvoisier for scanning the original negatives, Michelle Madden Smith for creating our new BurnStore, and my son Bryan for making the book video (and Michelle for editing it) and my other son Erin for helping me find the Liggins family and doing video of the reunion. 

Tell It Like It Is is also a 25 print show, big 60”x40” silver gelatin prints at LOOK3, along with Haenyeo: Angels of the Sea (which is also a new book), along with NO FILTER, prints of some of my Brazil work. So I’ve got my hands full.

In short, we’ll be shipping as fast as we can, but cannot promise your package will go out until after June 15. 

But do come see me at LOOK3. It’s the best U.S. photo fest hang. Down home style. 

I put my heart into Tell It Like It Is in 1967, and I’ve put my heart into it now as well.

– david alan harvey
 

IMG_4675David Alan Harvey and assistant Kaya Lee Berne in his Outer Banks darkroom, 
printing silver-gelatin prints for the Collector’s Edition. Photo by Frank Overton Brown III

 

 

Tell It Like It Is 
by David Alan Harvey

 

 

order

 

Published by BurnBooks May 2015
Layout and Design: Anton Kusters and Diego Orlando
Image Color Correction: Paolo Lecca
Production: Michael Courvoisier, Kaya Lee Berne
Offset Printing by Grafiche Antiga, Treviso, Italy
15″ x 22.5″
 

Originally shot In 1967 when David Alan Harvey was just 23 and in graduate journalism school in Missouri. Tell It Like It Is was destined to be re-published. It is not an epic. It is a photographic slice of another era, and a small piece of one family’s history in the U.S.