workshop show and fiesta

from a work in progress photo essay being shot this week by Carolyn Beller titled Sweltering Summer

from a photo essay being shot this week on the "Occupy Wall Street" protesters. Photographed by Tracie Williams

from a photo essay being shot this week by Milli Apelgren titled Bedford Avenue

275 Responses to “workshop show and fiesta”


  • AVE AKAKIUS!!!!

    AKAKY: Thinks well of himself, doesn’t he?

    AKAKY IRL: He’s full of shit. All politicians are.

    AKAKY: You’re kidding? That dope’s running for something?

    AKAKY IRL: He’s running for mayor of Pompeii.

    AKAKY: Really? That’s sort of a dead end job, ain’t it, what with no one but cats, archaeologists, and tourists in the neighborhood.

    AKAKY IRL: Hope springs eternal, I guess.

    AKAKY: I guess so.

  • too many so called photographers offer workshops because they cannot make a living in photography …… a bit like people who sell a farmer’s produce and compete against him via marketting.

  • I’ve been away here for a while due to a couple of family bereavements and an unwell parent; but have been reading most days, just had no time to comment.

    I’ve never done a workshop; but have had a (nearly) one-hour Skype session with David; and quite a few Skype text “conversations”. What I found after the Skype face to face chat was that it took a while for it all to sink in. I did notice a difference pretty much right away; but the major changes happened 6-months or so down the track.

    Thinking back; it wasn’t the technical critique that helped me the most (even though it was important) it was the re-evaluating of my thoughts on how I wanted to shoot new work. It was a change in thinking; more than any technique change. It was getting out of the magazine/photo library mind set. I look back at the work I have in photo libraries and cringe…. Ouch…

    I can imagine a week-long workshop would be an intense version of what I’ve mentioned above. But it still requires the hard yards to be put in afterwards as there is no silver bullet. It all comes down to how hard you are prepared to work afterwards. And also; what you define as a successful outcome; to me that would be attempting (and hopefully succeeding) to push work to a new level. Just my 2c worth! :-)

  • Imants; your input into my work has been invaluable. Thanks! :-)

  • I’ve posted this before. It’s about writing; but equally applies to photogrphy…

  • As someone whose entire photo education was in the form of workshops I can guarantee you that a few days spent with Charles Gatewood, Sally Mann or the late (and amazing) James Fee will indeed get you in touch with your wisdom mind. All the rest, we already know. My best to all.

    http://www.prefixmag.com/media/pearl-jam/mother-pink-floyd-cover-live-on-fallon-video/56978/

  • http://www.artshow2011.com/

    ALL CLICK ABOVE AND SUBMIT: 20THOUSAND SQUARE FEET gallery will open in LA , to accept MR. BRAINWASH’s request, All accepted (he stole my idea) and by the end of the show ALL DONATED WORK WILL BE DESTROYED (BURN-ED)…NOthing to sale!!!!..only TO SHOWCASE AND DESTROY..
    (i will steal his idea next time, ha ha ,fair enough???????????)

  • btw..Mr.Brainwash is Banksy’s protege (see movie EXIT THROUGH THE GIFTSHOP)

  • aLSO thank u ALL THAT SUBMITTED AND SUPPORT “BURN-ED GARDEN” EXHIBITION STARTING OCTOBER 8TH IN SA TEXAS and dreaming to move it to Australia…unless..everything is SOLD out and then i’ll have “nothing” for Australia!!!! how cool could that be!
    AlSo BURN.02 BOOKS WILL BE AVAILABLE ON THE SPOT FOR SALE!

    we also gonna PROJECT PART OF THE BOOK ON THE BUILDING WALL SO EVEN CARS CAN SEE THE SHOW FROM THE STREETS!!!!etc! blah blah!

  • Oh my, “don’t bother to go to anyone else’s workshop but mine”? I shall try to restrain myself.

  • Wind-up
    Charles Gatewood, now I havn’t seen his name mentioned for awhile. Must google him. Loved his street stuff (and I’m not a big street fan, don’t relate, grew up and still live in the sticks)

  • Whoa, just googled Gatewood, he’s been up to some kinky stuff since I last connected with him back in the late seventies.

  • “Charles Gatewood picked up where Diane Arbus left off”
    Robert Crumb

  • Panos…

    Thanks again for all you’re doing with that exhibit! Wish I could be there, hope some burnians make it.

  • Damn, now I can’t use an exclamation point for another 100,000 words.

  • http://instagr.am/p/O8B8p/

    Push!

    Mike yes , two super cool burnians are coming to help/rescue .
    One from Canada and one from Minneapolis ! Michael and all thank u again for submitting !
    peace! I’ll be keeping u all updated promptly!

  • This week will be very busy!! Hanging, labeling , coz the exhibition opens next Saturday , plus I’m receiving some “heavy” names/ prints , this week
    Too..!! Still flying, on airplanes , arriving from all over the world!!!

  • Some very huge , gynormous , heavy paper prints, refuse/rejected the magnets.. But , smiling, we got few ideas to go around it.. New, sophisticated ideas!!!

  • Rick Perry, governor of Panos’ newly adopted state:

    “I don’t believe man-made global warming is settled in science enough.”

    “I’m not afraid to say I’m a skeptic about [climate change].”

    You don’t need to be afraid, but you should be ashamed, Rick.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JRc_9nNTZg0&feature=player_embedded

    Turns out climate scientists are in fact wrong… but not in the direction we’d prefer. Computer models predictions are UNDER estimating the speed at which arctic ice is melting. A completely ice free arctic is possible not in 2050 or 2100, but quite likely in 2030 or 2020. Maybe sooner. Ugh.

  • Rick Perry, governor of Panos’ newly adopted state:
    ——————————–
    objection!
    (we r moving back HOME to venice beach sooooooooooonest after all that !!!!!!!
    there is always one home and one home ONLY!
    AS DAH SAID ONCE : “MY AVALON!”

  • Objection sustained! I retract that comment. ;^}

  • sustained is better than overruled although the River Walk/Missions , bike path rules!!!!!!!

  • anytime Ross ……..it is a great project of yours anda part of life that you seem to understand and capable of translating photographically

  • IMANTS..

    you wrote: “too many so called photographers offer workshops because they cannot make a living in photography …… a bit like people who sell a farmer’s produce and compete against him via marketing.”

    i think this CAN be true..however, most often i feel the opposite…

    i think that workshops provide for students an economic alternative to the formal education institutions where guaranteed 100% of the teachers do not earn a living in photography and are often honestly “out of the loop” of what is actually going on in the craft….

    photo workshop teachers at the very best workshop venues like Santa Fe, TPW, etc etc do in fact provide teachers/mentors who ARE in the biz …and at a much much lower cost than a year at university, spending many thousands of dollars, and getting only a very cursory look at this craft…some do better than others of course, but just by their very nature the faculty is a faculty…a set group of people who do not move…..these faculties do have a lot to offer of course at the very best universities, but an even larger number honestly send students out into a world with seriously useless information…i am often shocked when i hear what some teachers tell their students…truly embarrassing, truly not accurate, truly harmful to the student who wants to grow…of course the naturally talented will survive even the worst teachers

    there are exceptions and there is of course extraordinary value in university educations in general, but for very specific interests in photography, no way to beat a workshop….i did both…uni, grad school, and workshop..for what i wanted as a serious photographer, the workshop was the ticket and i was at one of the very best institutions for docu photography…

    i have thought for a long time to do a series of interviews with the directors of the best institutions…for some are good and i do not want to put out a blanket disparaging comment…all in perspective of course…

    you must look around and be judicious …but the wasted time and dollars i see out there are for too much equipment and too much tuition at many institutions….a wisely chosen workshop with a mentor you respect should be a lifetime investment that will outlast and outweigh all of the others…

    you and i will meet in Sydney and hopefully do some teaching duets if you will…there is always something to learn…

    cheers, david

  • I don’t know this is chinese or greek (or whatever) proverb tell “Great philosophers makes many good philosophers, but good philosophers makes many great great philosophers”.

    I think wise teacher don’t have to be a great photographer. Otherwise, looking for talents further than in the glare of the greatest could be a waste of time. I am sure the pupils of the masters are not the sole emegring photographers with the hope of success.

  • David…

    I suppose there must be some of the greats who are useless at teaching. I’ve seen this with some guitarists, absolute naturals all gut instinct but could never explain there style, magic or technique.

  • MARCIN

    agreed…a great teacher does not have to be great at what he/she teaches…that COULD be the case, but it is not necessary to be sure…

    what we were discussing Marcin was not the greatness of the artist/teacher, but the knowledge of the craft being taught by that teacher…the actual content…the stuff…the information..the reality…

    very specifically teachers who themselves need to be taught, or brought up to date, or properly informed…the nature of an institution is ironically often a closed environment..the antithesis of learning….again, not all…i want to be clear on that point…but, many…many hurt more than help…

    yes, of course there is no perfect teaching environment…i know this…and something is better than nothing…i know this too…but one must carefully pick and choose their path… you need two things as always: (a) content, (b) presentation..all i was saying is that you cannot present very honestly/accurately/helpfully IF you do not have the content…and the same is true of books, shows, magazines, everything….content has always been king, but now more than ever…

    cheers, david

  • Paul there is much truth to what u said: i know how to ride a bike but its so hard to try teach anyone (especially an adult) how to balance on a bicycle…somehow its easier to teach a kid! what is it? Innocence? No fear? why kids learn fast and adults stall? is that old saying “cant teach an old dog new tricks still in effect???????? smiling!

  • PAUL

    yes…and Marcin is quite correct…great teachers might be great at what they teach or they might not be…two separate things…..some can do it , and cannot teach it, and some can teach it and cannot do it, and some can do both…one could easily make long lists of examples for all three categories…and even the word “teaching” is very very subjective..some teach “how to”, some inspire….basically , we are all students and all teachers….one thing for sure about homo sapiens…we are fast fast friggin learners..amazing really …what we pulled out of the dirt, water, rocks, and trees in 10,000 years is phenomenal(there isn’t anything else for resources..i mean this laptop came out of the dirt on the ground..literally…think about it…)…..nobody knows everything…but everybody knows something..collectively we have no boundaries…all is possible that we can imagine, all is possible that we cannot imagine……impressive, truly what man has learned from fellow man in the last 10,000 years…it can seem perhaps a bit depressing what we have not learned about relationships and a variety of humanistic subtleties…but hell, we just got here!!!

    PANOS..

    it is harder to teach an old dog new tricks but ONLY because of lack of an open mind, not because of the actual physical age…old people can do great things if they WANT to…children learn easier simply because they have a clean slate, do not have any baggage, and learning is in fact the nature of survival in the earliest stages of life…once survival is established, man often stops learning to survive in the most basic sense of it…this is not good…

    one must wake up every morning seeing , smelling, feeling like a wild animal needs to feel in order to survive..

    complacent means dead..maybe literally and most certainly artistically…

    cheers, david

  • .collectively we have no boundaries…
    —————————————-

    yes yes yes..
    ALL,
    support Burn, support “BURN-ED GARDEN” opening this saturday in SA TEXAS!
    because collectively we have NO boundaries indeed!

  • Also, we gonna do a big projection on the gallery building outer walls of BURN.02 BOOK so people can see and enjoy , parts of the book throughout the city , even if they are randomly driving the cars in the surrounding streets!!!!! and dont forget the free beer, taco stands, dj’s and “dancers”!!!!!!
    but most important :
    YOUR ART WILL BE ON THE WALL!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! COLLECTIVELY!!!!!!!!!!!!

  • DAH:

    Ah. I don’t think I could hear everything as I was in the back of the room.

    Best,

    Davin

  • Eva and DAH: I corrected my post and removed any mention of Gilden. I think I need my ears checked. I was in the back of the room and obviously could not hear him refer to “too many workshops”. My apologies.

  • I’d just add that a good university education provides benefits far beyond the photo aspect. It’s not much use being a good photographer, documentary at least, if you don’t have much understanding of what you’re photographing.

    My university training was pretty much like one of David’s workshops only spread out over semesters. Expectations were high, we went out and shot, the class critiqued our slides, guests dropped by, we learned history and watched lots of slideshows of iconic photographers (that part was much more thorough than a workshop), we had a show at the end. No party though. Of course all aren’t the same.

    And the general journalism classes, including jlaw and ethics were important as well.

  • DAVID,

    Just like you agreed to with me, I have to agree with you.
    But like other proverb says “There is always hundreds ways to one point”
    The most important is to find just one of them.

    piece of cake…. looking from the point…

  • http://instagr.am/p/PAMAU/

    2 AWESOME PRINTS ARRIVED FROM CANADA FROM Burnian mr. HLADUN!
    THANK U!!!!!!!

  • http://instagr.am/p/PANux/

    VENICE CA, IN THE MIX..PRINTS FROM CHUCK FARLEY , just arrived!

  • http://instagr.am/p/PAP2C/

    ALSO, AUDREY BARDOU’s package from FRANCE, juuuuuuuuuuuuuust arrived!!!!!!!!!!!!
    for BURN-ED GARDEN EXHIBITION!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  • PANOS..

    “Also, we gonna do a big projection on the gallery building outer walls of BURN.02 BOOK so people can see and enjoy , parts of the book throughout the city , even if they are randomly driving the cars in the surrounding streets!!!!!”

    You mean, that if there’s people banging their heads into light poles or crashing into the car in front of them it’ll be BURN’S fault???

  • If I had favour between a teacher with a vast photography knowledge and not being a very inspiring tutor and a teacher with less knowledge but with the capacity to inspire all those round him/her, I’m sure I’d choose the second. Of course if you can choose one with both all the better, but I’ve seen time and time again very knowledgeable teachers who just killed the creativity within a pupil because of their lack of enthusiasm.

    If you’re going to take a pupil whatever their age into the uncharted realms of their creativity, they require without doubt a strong and sturdy guide who is just as amazed and engaged by the magic within our creative minds. This teacher must be just as prepared as the pupil to invest a part of his soul in that dream and if it means believing dragonflies are fairies and Elvis is sick and tired of working at that gas station up in Nevada, then you do it.

  • a civilian-mass audience

    can I sing now?

  • RE: Ignorance is Bliss, you just don’t understand the ethics of religious Americans, Panos. Anything that give any kind of enjoyment has to have negative consequences, so in the case of cannabis, since there really aren’t any, they have to manufacture them by making it illegal and siccing the cops on people. Look at what they do with pain pills; load them up with mass quantities of acetaminophen, which really doesn’t do much, so that anyone who abuses them stands a fair chance of fucking up their liver. Anyway, examples are numerous, but that’s the root of it. Unadulterated good times are unchristian and must be punished.

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