Monthly Archive for April, 2018

Joan Alvado – Cuban Muslims, Tropical Faith

Joan Alvado

Cuban Muslims, Tropical Faith

[ EPF 2017 – SHORT LIST ]

Cuba is one of the last countries in the world where Islam has entered. Although is still widely unknown, the number of Cubans embracing Islam has constantly increased in the recent years. This growth is strongly linked with the current scenario of changes in Cuba, which includes a higher tolerance towards religions.
With a current population around 3.000, Cuban Muslims are present in several districts of La Habana but also have expanded to many other provinces, like Camagüey, Santiago or Varadero. The growth of this community is strongly linked with the current scenario of changes in Cuba, which includes a higher tolerance towards religions.

 

 

Why a Muslim community is born in the middle of a Socialist Caribbean Island?

The “Cuban Muslims” project is not aiming to give closed answers, but provide clues for reflection. By delving into one of the most unique Muslim communities worldwide, an innovative approach to Cuba and Islam is generated. The goal is to break visual stereotypes, questioning issues like identity, faith and traditions.

 

 

Short Bio

Born in Altea in 1979, Joan Alvado has lived in Barcelona since 2005. His works have been published in media like The New York Times, Newsweek, CNN, The Washington Post, Bloomberg BusinessWeek, El Pais, La Repubblica, Der Spiegel, Hurriyet, VICE, Descobrir Catalunya, 7K magazine, Huffington Post, Voima or Le Point, among others. Part of his work has been exhibited in several events and photo festivals in Spain, Cuba, Turkey, France, Slovenia or Italy. Since 2013, he has collaborated with the collective of Turkish photographers NAR Photos. His archive is distributed by agencies like AFP, Getty Images, Laif and Luz Photo. In 2015, his project “School of Shepherds” received the “Lens Culture Emerging Talent Award.” In 2016, his project “Cuban Muslims” won the “New FNAC Photography Talent” award in Spain.

 

Related Links

 

joanalvado.com

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The Emerging Photographer Fund is supported by generous donors to the Magnum Foundation

Magnum Foundation

Karl Mancini – Amores Perros

Buenos Aires, Isla Maciel. The guys smoke a joint in their favorite place in the Isla, a former dump site in the old harbor area where they often gather to isolate, spend time in solitude, talk. The place is highly contaminated by the quaint Riachuelo flowing a few inches from them. They don’t care about the risk they run for their health. They love dangers and always live to the limit risking a lot. Life does not have a very high price for so many kids who live in these conditions and it is constantly threatened. All of them at least once in life thought of committing suicide. Riachuelo is one of the most contaminated rivers in the world. Its dirty waters delimit borders and people who have their houses in its proximity live in alarming conditions.

Karl Mancini

Amores Perros

 

In Buenos Aires the dirty waters of Riachuelo delimit borders and people who have their houses in its proximity live in alarming conditions. On one side it is Capital Federal, on the other it is Avellaneda, here Buenos Aires, there the Province. One of the suburbs on the river is called Isla Maciel. Amores Perros is a story of love and pain, a story of skin, street, drug, fight and violence. It is the story of some adolescents. Their stories are the stories of many Argentinean boys and girls who grow up on the streets, to whom the drug Paco has been sold since the age of eight years old because cocaine is too expensive (20 pesos is the cost of a dose of Paco, just over one euro), whose effects last about two minutes and condemn people to life of dependence and slavery, often to death.

 

 

Wrath, pain, impotence, misery not only economic are their daily lives. Everyone has inherited this situation by many factors: a family that doesn’t exist, violent, addicted or alcoholic parents, an absent government that ignores suburbs, a police often corrupt and accomplice who often comes to terms with the narcos. They have no life’s expectations. Being together is the only way to support each other, spending their days walking without rest looking for food, relieving anger in their raps, loving carnally and, at the same time, fighting like dogs.

A few minutes from the touristic and colorful barrio of la Boca (meaning due to the fact that it overlooks a stretch of Riachuelo, one of the most contaminated rivers in the world that flows into the Rio de la Plata) just taking a boat where an improvised Caronte drives you through the marsh waters to the opposite shore, it is possible to reach La Isla Maciel. It can also be reached by crossing the recently constructed Nicolas Avellaneda bridge, on both sides of which many drug dealers wait for phantoms who are looking for their goods.

La Isla was founded by Italian immigrants and port workers who dared to cross in the river and settle into what once was a swamp surrounded by the waters of Rio de la Plata, the dirty Riachuelo and the steam Maciel. Over time, a highway was constructed that cuts half the Isla delimiting two new zones, the favela of Villa Trankila and the Dock Sur with its towers and thanks to an infrastructure project over the past 10 years, Isla has lost its insular condition.

This division is now theater of conflicts, a war for territorial control made by Narcos groups. The only truce is possible on every Sunday in the football field located in the center of the Isla, where San Telmo plays, the barrio team, the team of everyone.

 

 

People who live in neighborhood like this are often labeled as criminals, discriminated, relieved of any opportunity to improve their status, to have access to structures that can help them or achieve a different job and future for themselves and their families. Abandoned people who organize themselves to not die. Here there are cases of 12-year-old’s adolescents who want to kill themselves having no life’s expectations. Being together is the only way to support each other. Some guys struggle to keep themselves from dying, others let themselves go with no chances to come back.

 

 

Bio

Karl Mancini (b.1978) is an Italian documentary photographer based out of Rome and Buenos Aires. He studied photojournalism in New York at the International Center of Photography (ICP). Since 2001 he has worked in more than 90 countries, with a particular preference for Asia and South America, as a freelance photojournalist and writer, following socio-historical and political events and focusing on issues such as gender violence (to which he is working on since 12 years), war aftermaths, minorities, human rights, migration, the tragic story of landmines. His longterm work “Ni una menos” about the feminicide and violence against women has been shortlisted at the Sony World Photography Award 2017, won the 3rd prize at the Luis Valtuena Humanitarian Photography Award, the 2nd prize at Days Japan International Photojournalism Award 2018, the 2nd prize at the Kolga Awards 2017 and was finalist at Lugano Photo Days 2017. His works have also been exhibited in USA, England, Russia, Australia, India, Japan, Italy, Greece, Spain, Switzerland and in many important international festivals, earning him several awards in many prestigious competitions. His stories have been featured in some of the most prominent magazines and newspapers from all over the world and he regularly collaborate with International NGOs and international magazines and newspapers such as Newsweek, Stern Magazine, Der Spiegel, Marie Claire, CNN, Vanity Fair, Internazionale, Amnesty International Wordt Vervolgd, El Pais, El Mundo, Io Donna, NZZ am Sonntag, Woz, il Venerdi, La Repubblica and many others. In 2014 he was selected as one of the Emerging European Talents by the online magazine LensCulture and was one of the finalists at Portfolio Italia-Fiaf. In 2015 he published his first book, ITALIANSKIJ, about the Italian community in Crimea persecuted during the Stalinian Purges.

He’s currently working on violence against women extending his long term project ‘Ni una menos’ to the other Latin American countries where the situation is alarming. The common line that sadly connect so many and different countries is gender violence in all its aspects (domestic, psychological, physical, economic, institutional, cultural, obstetrical). He strongly believes that it’s very important to give visibility and voice to victims who doesn’t have it, inspiring more of them to come forward to tell their stories and bring pressure on the governments. At the same time he’s working on an other long term “La linea invisible” about life in the suburbs of South America through the eyes of the youngsters.

Related Links

karlmancini.com

 

Ekkarat Punyatara – Black Day

Ekkarat Punyatara

Black Day

Thailand is one of the last countries in the world that most of the people still have so much love for the king. The king is the soul of the nation. I grew up in Thailand. As a Thai, I thought I had known well about the love of Thai people toward our king but not knowing well enough till the day King Bhumibol Adulyadej passed away. 

October 13, 2016 after the prime minister officially confirmed the news I quickly headed to Siriraj hospital, where the king’s body was for shooting. I got there about 8.30 pm. which was quite late. The soldiers already started removing people out of the hospital for a parade to deliver the body to Grand Palace for the funeral. I stuck in front of the gate with many people. Some people were still crying and many of them still had the crying mark on their faces. 

 

 

Time passing by but seems more and more people were coming. Some people started siting down on the street then many people followed. Some people started praying for the king then many people followed. Some people started singing a song for the king then many people followed. I asked if there is anyone know that the mourning event would happen but no one know. As a normal people I’m sure everyone knew that they won’t be able to get inside but they just wanted to be there.  I can feel at that time they didn’t even care what would happen actually they just wanted to be close by their beloved king. 

 

 

It was not just that day. It kept go on like this after the bureau placed the body at the Grand Palace for the formal funeral as well. Thousands of people everyday queuing for praying respect the king inside the Palace. And many more were sitting around the wall praying and even touching wall. The image of people touching the wall was magically moved me. I was very intrigued by the melancholy I felt and it was the feeling that made these people came so far for just touching the wall. It made me, not as a journalist but as a Thai awared that I need to document the feeling of myself and Thai people toward this important historical moment of the country. 

 

Black Day is my personal project during a year long mourning capturing the air of melancholy surrounded Thailand. It is the evidence of the emotion of Thais toward the lost of the people who is the heart of the country. It is the fiction I hope it is non-fiction.

 

Bio

Ekkarat Punyatara is a National Geographic Thailand’s photo editor and staff photographer based in Bangkok, Thailand. His photography is inspired by fascination in Thai culture that he was rooted since childhood by his conservative family. Beside worldwide assignments as an outsider, Ekkarat will be in his home country documenting and portraiting the lives of his beloved country as the sight of the insider. 

 

Related Links

David Arribas González – Scars / Cicatrices

Trabajo documental sobre el galgo en España después de la finalización de la temporada de caza.

David Arribas González

Scars / Cicatrices

[ EPF 2017 – SHORT LIST ]

Spain is one of the few countries where the hunting with greyhounds is a legal activity. What was a way of survival for the familiar core in rural areas, now (when it is not a vital activity anymore) has been reinvented and turned into a sport, preserving is practice into the traditional culture of the country.

At the ending of the hunting season, in February, the dogs that are not useful, either by injuries, lack of competivity or by the age, are abandoned or, in the worst of cases, are deleted using highly aggressive practices such as being hung.

 

Dog shelters and houses of reception try to give a dignified life to the higher quantity of this abandoned hounds, touching unfortunate conditions of overpopulation.

The spanish laws, that are not strict concerning animal rights, keep this situation going on each year.

 

Short Bio

(Spain. 1978) Arribas studied photography in Madrid from 2010 to 2015 and learnt a lot in different workshops and courses related to this branch of photography with photographers such as Antonio Heredia, Manu Brabo, Susana Giron, and Antoine d’Agata.

He continues studying self-taught photography and attending courses and seminars. At the moment, he is based in Madrid, Spain and dedicates himself to the accomplishment of photographic works of long route related to social projects and human character.

 

Related Links

 

davidarribas.com

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The Emerging Photographer Fund is supported by generous donors to the Magnum Foundation

Magnum Foundation

 

Loulou d’Aki – Down by the Water

S. on the abandoned movie set and the last rays of sun.

Loulou d’Aki

Down by the Water

[ EPF 2017 – SHORT LIST ]
The first times I went to Iran I did so to work on a personal project about Iranian youth and their aspirations as a part of a larger project I was working on across the Middle East. My subjects and I spent a lot of time together during the portrait sessions and at some point they would all ask me what I had seen of the country so far. All of them seemed to agree that I really had to go down to the Persian Gulf and visit the islands Hormuz, Qeshm, and Kish where life seemed to be relatively free in comparison to Tehran and where many young people from the mainland would try to spend some time every year. 
 
 
 
 
Iran sits on one side of the Strait of Hormuz, which connects the Persian Gulf to the Arabian sea. It’s considered the world’s most important throughway for oil – 30% of the world’s seaborne traded oil goes through the strait but despite of its natural riches, the inhabitants along the Persian Gulf are amongst the poorest in the country. 5 kilometres off the mainland, southeast of the port city Bandar Abbas, lies Hormuz, once upon a time the main port in the strait, visited by Marco Polo who praised the island where tens of thousands had settled. For centuries, the countries on both sides of the Gulf were in good relations and people travelled the region without passports. Today the population is below 10,000 and unemployment is high ever since relations with Oman soured during Mahmoud Ahmadinejad’s presidency. Before, locals would go to Oman in the morning and return at night with smuggled goods to sell in the mainland city of Bandar Abbas.
 
 
 
 
The island Qeshm, 60 kilometres away, is a free trade zone where paperless Pakistani ship builders keep up the tradition of wooden ship construction, side by side with traditional islanders and where youngsters from the mainland travel to feel a bit more free, away from the watching eye of the Islamic republic on the mainland.
 
 

Short Bio

Loulou d’Aki is a photographer, member of Agence VU’. She was born and raised on the Swedish seaside and graduated with a Master in photography at ISFCI in Rome, Italy. Since then she has lived and worked across Europe, North America, Japan and the Middle East.

As a photographer she is interested in how human beings are affected by the society in which they live, the influence of borders and the idea of freedom.

Alongside commissioned work Lou focuses on various long term projects, such as Make a Wish, a photo essay looking at how the hopes and dreams of youth in conflict zones are conditioned by society. The project recently won Cortona on the Move dummy award and will be published as a book in 2018. Lou is a Swedish Arts council grantee for a project called Mother of choice, which she is currently working on, a documentary work about self chosen single motherhood in Sweden.

Lou was a singer before she became a photographer. She speaks five languages and lives in Athens.

 

Related Links

 

dakiloulou.com

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The Emerging Photographer Fund is supported by generous donors to the Magnum Foundation

Magnum Foundation