Igor Elukov – The North

Igor Elukov

The North

[ FUJIFILM/YOUNG TALENT AWARD 2016 FINALIST ]

That day, as always, the snowstorm was swirling on and on.

We wandered through tundra for about an hour.

Everything was white all around and I started to forget where the top is and where the bottom is.

The snow was filling my eyes and my mouth. It was hard to breathe, as if you are sinking.

It was impossible to see the border between the sky and the earth through the snowdrift. The earth was like sea.

We drove through the abandoned towns with Stalin-era architecture; they stood white, empty, clean, as bones in the field, whitened by the wind.

The thing about this emptiness is that it is impossible to break it, to fill it.

You are absent. It is you who become everything around: the creek, the river, the fire in the stove, the steam over the fish broth, miles and miles of swamps and a lonely man sleeping on a plank bed.

When the snowstorm was over I went out for a walk.

Tundra was polished by the wind, it was perfectly smooth and white, and I felt uneasy that I should leave my footprints on it.

 

 

Short Bio

Igor Elukov is a photographer and filmmaker born in Kirov, Russia in 1991. He is a teacher at “Fotografika” Academy of photojournalism and documentary photography, St. Petersburg, Russia. His work has been exhibited in various galleries such as: “Fotografika” gallery, St. Petersburg, Russia (solo) Ian Perry Scholarship exhibition, Hoxton Gallery, London, UK (group). Elukov is based in St. Petersburg.

 

Related Links

Igor Elukov

 

FujiFilm_Basic-Black

Amnon Gutman – Ukraine Crisis – The East

Pro Russia rebel soldiers  bath in the waters of lake Sherbakova Park during the celebration of the Orthodox Epiphany in Donetsk.

Amnon Gutman

Ukraine Crisis – The East

[ EPF 2016 FINALIST ]

Since the September 5, 2014 ceasefire deal in Minsk Both Pro Russia rebels and the UA army used the relative lull to build up their forces and for months the rebels tried to seize Donetsk airport, a strategic and symbolic asset, from government forces. With the start of 2015, a new rebel push began and by 22 January the airport was in their hands. In February 12, 2015 a new ceasefire deal was reached through international mediation, in an attempt to stop the fighting spiraling out of control. The important logistic railway hub city of Debaltseve fell into rebels hands a few days after the deal was struck.

January-February 2015

A prolonged crisis in Ukraine began on 21 November 2013, when then-president Viktor Yanukovych suspended preparations for the implementation of an association agreement with the European Union. This decision resulted in mass protests by its opponents, known as the “Euromaidan”. After months of such protests, Yanukovych was ousted by the protesters on 22 February 2014, when he fled the Ukrainian capital city of Kiev. Following his ousting, unrest enveloped the largely Russophone eastern and southern regions of Ukraine, from where he had drawn most of his support. An ensuing political crisis in Ukrainian autonomous region of Crimea resulted in the annexation of Crimea by Russia on 18 March. Subsequently, unrest in Donetsk and Luhansk oblasts of Ukraine evolved into a war between the post-revolutionary Ukrainian government and pro-Russian insurgents.

The conflict in the east has claimed the lives of more then 9000 people so far. (UN figures- December 2015), and left approximately 660,000 people displaced inside Ukraine (UNHCR- January 2016).

This is one part of a continuing ongoing project 2014-2016 documenting the conflict in East Ukraine between Pro Russia rebels and Ukraine: the way it affects the country within itself/ international relations between Ukraine-The West and Russia.

 

 

Short Bio

Growing up in a war conflicted region, Gutman has always been deeply aware of the possibility of loss. Photography empowers him to share this insight, demonstrating the horrible, equalizing moment of the possibility of loss, the universality of vulnerability. There is nothing clearer, nothing more precious than the preservation of the life force in the face of violence and disease. This is what Amnon am attempting to articulate with my images of the world. Gutman is also part of a group of international photojournalists committed to informing the public about the repercussions of environmental degradation on human life around the world: @everydayclimatechange.

As an independent photographer, he has covered the conflict in the East of Ukraine since its began in 2014.

 

Related Links

Amnon Gutman

Bradley Pearce – The Photographer Who Couldn’t

61502058361-Media-14

Bradley Pearce

The Photographer Who Couldn’t

[ FUJIFILM/YOUNG TALENT AWARD 2016 RUNNER UP ]

In “The Photographer Who Couldn’t” Pearce presents himself as the titular photographer and through a mixture of appropriation, studio photography and photo montage Pearce attempts to come to terms with his identity and overcome his photographers block. This photographer’s block has been caused by his father who was a professional football player; Pearce did not follow in his father’s footsteps, instead choosing the become a photographer meaning that he did not succumb to the pressure placed on him from both family and society.

“Volume One” of the project showed Pearce’s struggle with his father’s image and was seen in his handmade book. The book is a unique “one-off” copy. All images and text were glued into the 52-page Panini sticker book by hand as is clear in the imperfect aesthetic of the piece; the non-parallel layout and poorly cut elements reflect Pearce’s struggle with his identity. In the book Pearce moves from giving out cameras in a jazz club to an attempt to become his father through staged studio portraiture and the appropriation of old images.

In “Volume Two” Pearce attempts to find some resolution for his struggle with his identity. Through a series of positive slides, taken in 1969 in Seattle that show his great-grand mother on holiday, he attempts to reconnect with his family and overcome his photographers block. By editing himself into these images Pearce aims to reconnect with his family through photography and therefore overcome the issues of representation that are placed on his shoulders.

By placing his own images, text and appropriated pieces into a Panini book and slides respectively Pearce reflects the relatable burden placed onto our shoulders by both family and society. The theme of phototherapy is present in this work and Pearce uses the camera as a means of healing.

 

 

Short Bio

Bradley Pearce is a fine art photographer who specializes in self-portrait work that is based on themes of identity and representation. Using studio photography and post production Pearce creates scenes and photo-montages that reflect narratives focused on the self and the perception of the self. Pearce deals with relatable topics including: societal and familial representation, and the difficulty of understanding one’s own identity. By using text in his work Pearce not only creates another layer to his pieces but also creates intricate narratives that are always based on truth. For example, in his latest piece “The Photographer Who Couldn’t” all interactions and happenings are true, as well as the main theme of the work which is based off of the life of his father. Pearce also takes part in conceptual work for others including a body of work at Wolverhampton Art Gallery based off of an item from their archives and a commissioned piece for the Birmingham Midland Institute.

 

Related Links

Bradley Pearce

 

FujiFilm_Basic-Black

Drew Nikonowicz – This World and Others Like It

summer_2014 047

Drew Nikonowicz

This World and Others Like It

[ FUJIFILM/YOUNG TALENT AWARD 2016 RUNNER UP ]

This World and Others Like It investigates the role of the 21st century explorer by combining computer modeling with analogue photographic processes. Drawing upon the language of 19th Century survey images, I question their relationship with current methods of record making. Thousands of explorable realities exist through rover and probe based imagery, virtual role-playing, and video game software. Within the contemporary wilderness, robots have replaced photographers as mediators producing images completely dislocated from human experience. This suggests that now the sublime landscape is only accessible through the boundaries of technology.

 

 

Short Bio

Drew Nikonowicz (born in St. Louis Missouri, 1993) presently lives and works in Treviso, Italy. He received a BFA from the University of Missouri-Columbia in 2016. His work employs computer simulations as well as analog photographic processes to deal with landscape and exploration in contemporary photography. He recently won the 2015 Lenscratch Student Prize, the 2015 Aperture Portfolio Prize, and exhibited his work at the Museum of Contemporary Art of Rome. He is currently a resident artist at Fabrica.

 

Related Links

Drew Nikonowicz

 

FujiFilm_Basic-Black

Amr Dabees – When Gods Fall

61402046275-Media-06

Amr Dabees

When Gods Fall

[ FUJIFILM/YOUNG TALENT AWARD 2016 RUNNER UP ]

For long time they have been the Gods of my own world. The great masters of reality. It always irritated me and challenged me to escape from all of this… and when I escaped I decided to come back just to destroy the myth of a false divinity and purity, I just had to fight.

 

 

Short Bio

Born in 1991. I Studied pharmacy for 5 years and Then I dropped out to break the cycle and search, but it was not long until I found myself back to Alexandria my home town to work on a long project about me and my parents.

 

FujiFilm_Basic-Black

Giovanni Cocco – Displacement

 

Giovanni Cocco

DISPLACEMENT. The Loss Of Cities As Blueprints For Societies

[ EPF 2016 FINALIST ]

I perceived what displacement can mean while strolling down the busted roads of L’Aquila, Italy, with the writer Caterina Serra. The earthquake of the 6th of April 2009 converted the historical town into a building site, in an undistinguished non-lieu of new buildings that resurfaced from the dusty debris under the guise of refurbished hotels, coffee shops and wine bars, as if these were the only suitable places for social life. The population meanwhile has been shifted and exiled into the New Towns, dormitory suburbs with centers that are nothing but the roundabouts of shopping malls, where one can feel a material and spiritual disorientation. A community has lost its public space, and all its places of individual and collective memories. So, what is left of a city that has lost its inhabitants? When its citizens are lost, and displaced to the anonymity of suburbia? What happens to its genius loci? The experience of L’Aquila has paired my vision with Caterina trying to understand how a community acknowledges itself under dire circumstances, how it elaborates what it can achieve or what it can recover. We wanted document how it can witness silently the dissolution of its identity, while coasting for survival. With the help of this Grant We would like to make a book and an exhibition. We would like to tell what happens to a place where politics is oblivious to the history, culture, and texture of its society and its communities. Where decision-makers have no experience, no imagination, no belonging. We want to speak about the physical and emotional geography of displacement.

 

 

Short Bio

Giovanni Cocco was born in Sulmona in 1973. Since 2004 he produced reportage of social inquiry. Selected for the ?Mentor? program by the International Agency of Photography “VII” – 2010 to 2012 – his work has been published in several international magazines. Currently he is an independent photographer based between Berlin and Rome.

 

Related Links

Giovanni Cocco

Sara Zanella – The Way Home

61402052853-Media-07 

Sara Zanella

The Way Home

[ FUJIFILM/YOUNG TALENT AWARD 2016 RUNNER UP ]

I’m driven by instinct. I started my photography journey when I was 16 in high school. I was attracted by the endless flow of life, by the changes, by catching what was making my day, I started to take pictures of my surroundings and relationships with irrationality and playfulness. I was fascinated by the changes that made up my day and the simple beauty in every day life. This is where photography was born for me, and my desire to document comes out of a natural will.

My approach to photography is personal and done in a diary form. After high school I moved from Italy to Denmark to study at Fatamorgana, school of Danish Art Photography. I was attending my courses, I got a boyfriend, built a home and an extended family there. Those relationships encouraged me to immerse myself in a intimate way to a foreign city and culture. I use my curiosity for travel and to explore places I’ve never been, photographing life and the people I meet along the way.

I want to create a connection with our inner personality, our emotional layers and show the intensity of these. My goal is building a record of humanity in a poetic and direct way.Last winter I spent a month in Moscow, photographing the city and people in their intimate and familiar spaces. My plan was to travel for another month thru Russia, in this way I could discover more about the country and the culture from the capital city to the smallest settlement on the Arctic Ocean. I stopped for few nights here and there in towns and villages as I made my way to Teriberka, I was welcomed and hosted by young people like myself in their homes, I photographed the locals,the lifestyle, the harsh winter terrain.

Thru my photography I convey the connection that I felt to the richness and diversity of our common humanity. This project is call The Way Home. I am ready to publish the first part of this project with Brothas and I would use to fund for the publication of the first part of the project.

 

 

Short Bio

I was born in Italy in 1993. I moved to Denmark to attend a year course at Fatamorgana, Danish School of Art photography in Copenhagen where I am based. The final project was a book, Winter, about my love relationship, unpublished. From November 2015 to February 2016 I moved to Russia for the project The Way Home where I travel from Moscow to Teriberka for 4 months. In February 2016 I started a travel exhibition, Never Hide, a series of photos from my early diaries to the ongoing project in Russia and I self published the catalogue of it. I exhibited in Moscow and in Copenhagen. In April 2016 I moved to New York City to photograph a new project in USA and to work at Magnum Photos as intern.

 

Related Links

Sara Zanella

 

FujiFilm_Basic-Black

Loulou d’Aki – Make a Wish

20-year old Maryam Sadeghi studies Illustration at the Academy of Art in Tehran and makes hand made jewelry which is sold in Texas. Maryam finds her country full of tiring restrictions and sadness is often bored:she is determined to emigrate to America once she finishes her studies. When asked about her future dreams and aspirations she says: “ I do not have many wishes because I got everything I wanted, but many little wishes do exist. One is to meet the actor Mehran Modir -  the only one who makes us laugh in this hard situation in Iran…My last wish, and many people are afraid of it - is death. I came to this egoistic world where everybody think about themselves…I hope that when I die, I shall find the world that I was always looking for. ”

Loulou d’Aki

Make a Wish

[ EPF 2016 FINALIST ]

“This is just a dream, but fortunately dreams do come true.” Cyrus P., 15, Tehran, Iran It’s a rainy November morning in Gaza and a truce has just been announced after 8 days of fighting. A young man stands in the rubbles of what is left of his home, destroyed in an air strike just an hour before the war ended. His name is Ahmed, he is 18 years old, the son of a fisherman. He wants to live in peace and go to college but we are in the Gaza strip and dreams have their limits here, you often have the feeling of being caught up in a game where you always turn out the looser.

MAKE A WISH is a photo essay looking at the hopes and dreams of youth, aiming to create a testimony of our time. It’s inspired by the fact that youth should be the age of infinite possibilities. Most of the MAKE A WISH project has been shot in the Middle East and in situations linked to the Arab Spring revolution or in conflict zones where youth too often is derived of it’s right to be young.

The Arab Spring catapulted a taste of freedom in people across a region so long affected by dictators, Western foreign policies gone awry and poor social development. Spring turned to summer, fall and winter, months turned to years and the original revolution into something much different from the ideals of freedom shouted at squares across the region. When I set out to work on this project, I did so with the assumption that youth is an age of infinite possibility when aspiration is not yet conditioned by experience. As the work evolved I began to understand until which extent aspirations are conditioned by the society in which we live and the circumstances under which we grow up.

Make a Wish is shot in medium format negative with a Hasselblad camera. For each portrait I ask the person to write down his or her dream in my notebook. Together, the text and the pictures become a testimony of youth of our time.

 

 

Short Bio

Loulou d’Aki is a photographer born and raised on the Swedish seaside. Her main interest lies in how human beings are affected by the society in which they live and the influence of visible or invisible borders. Alongside commissioned work and freelance editorials Lou focuses on various long term projects such as: MAKE A WISH a photo essay looking at the hopes and dreams of youngsters across the globe. CITY HEADACHE the post-war generation’s way of handling the Iranian dress code in its own way within a society where the urban recollection of war and martyrdom is an unevitable and constant factor. Lou’s work has been exhibited at Prix Bayeux Calvados des correspondents de guerre, Noorderlicht Photofestival, Singapore Photofestival, The Other hundred, Foto Leggendo, Mois de la photo, Portraet nu!… Some of her clients include Le Monde, die Zeit, New York Times, TIMES, NY Magazine, Dagens Nyheter, Internazionale, National Geographic Proof, Unicef, New Yorker etc.

 

Related Links

Loulou d’Aki

Aleksander Raczynski – Views

61502057469-Media-05

Aleksander Raczynski

Views

[ FUJIFILM/YOUNG TALENT AWARD 2016 WINNER ]

These images are part of longer series, taken in different places. They help me to understand the world and myself. My life and my photography are both a confrontation with my emotions, and make me feel closer to my soul and to the nature. I find it very helpful as what scares me the most is the lack of emotions.

 

Short Bio

Aleksander Raczynski was born in Lodz (Poland), and is a student of the National Film School there.

 

FujiFilm_Basic-Black

Annie Flanagan – Deafening Sound

Makeup disguises Maria's fractured eye as she prepares to board a train home to Oregon from Williston, North Dakota. Maria moved to Wiliston less than a month prior to seek work in America's Boomtown.  Since the oil boom took off in 2009, domestic violence has quadrupled in Williston, North Dakota.  (Williston, North Dakota / February 2014)

Annie Flanagan

Deafening Sound

[ EPF 2016 WINNER ]

Deafening Sound examines the deep roots of gendered violence and rape culture in American society. Presently, it combines three documentary projects, a portrait series and a collection of artifacts. It is structured so that each chapter examines different ways systematic gendered violence persists in America. It aims to reduce the stigma of gendered violence, address the complicated cycle of abuse and elevate consciousness about the prevalence of rape culture.

This project began when my best friend, Hannah, left her abusive boyfriend. In this relationship she experienced long-term exposure to emotional trauma, where she had little control and there was no hope of escape. This chapter (We Grew Up With Gum In Our Hair) and the accompanying video (Love, Hannah) focus on the correlation between domestic violence and PTSD.

In 2012, I began photographing with two sixteen year old best friends, Nekqua and Brittney, in Syracuse, New York. Months into this project both girls experienced sexual assault, in different experiences on the same day. This chapter (Hey, Best Friend!) works to understand the struggles young women must overcome in dealing with sexual assault.

Since 2013, I have worked closely with a women’s shelter in Williston, North Dakota. This chapter (Sweet Crude) follows survivors of intimate partner violence and sexual assault as they seek safety and support.

I am constantly working to further my investigation of this epidemic and visually address issues of gendered violence and representations of women in American society. If awarded the EPF, I will use a portion of the funding to continue working on and complete a film that follows Nekqua before, directly after and years after her assault. Additionally, I will photograph rural domestic violence in Alaska, where the rate of reported rape is three times the national average. If needed, I will shift to photograph rural domestic violence in the Dakotas, where I already have connections.

 

 

Short Bio

I picked up a camera in the 7th grade and it has since been the primary way in which I make sense of the world. I have had love affairs with other passions, but it has remained the only constant in my life.

I grew up in Washington, D.C. with amazing parents and three brothers and the constant, insane flux of friends and family. I have lived all over the United States; recently, I have mostly lived out of my car while working on projects. I am not used to having those quite moments in life, which I suppose is one reason I like to find those moments with photography.

My work focuses in American society and explores gender, mental health and friendship within the documentary framework. I tend to begin projects that are informed by experiences I have, or those close to me have, and then I look at how those expereinces exist on a large level and in different situations.

Right now, I live in New Orleans and try to keep life equal parts make believe and harsh realities.

Related Links

Annie Flanagan

EPF 2016 – The Winners

 

The Emerging Photographer Fund 2016

 

Makeup disguises Maria's fractured eye as she prepares to board a train home to Oregon from Williston, North Dakota. Maria moved to Wiliston less than a month prior to seek work in America's Boomtown.  Since the oil boom took off in 2009, domestic violence has quadrupled in Williston, North Dakota.  (Williston, North Dakota / February 2014)

Annie Flanagan

Deafening Sound

EPF 2016 WINNER – $10,000

Deafening Sound examines the deep roots of gendered violence and rape culture in American society. Presently, it combines three documentary projects, a portrait series and a collection of artifacts. It is structured so that each chapter examines different ways systematic gendered violence persists in America. It aims to reduce the stigma of gendered violence, address the complicated cycle of abuse and elevate consciousness about the prevalence of rape culture.

 

 

 

The EPF FujiFilm/Young Talent Award 2016

 

61502057469-Media-05

Aleksander Raczynski

Views

FUJIFILM/YOUNG TALENT AWARD 2016 WINNER – $5,000 + FujiFilm camera

 

 

FUJIFULM/YOUNG TALENT AWARD 2016 Runners up:

 

Sara Zanella – FujiFilm camera

Amr Dabees – FujiFilm camera

Drew Nikonowicz – FujiFilm camera

Bradley Pearce – FujiFilm camera

 

 

EPF 2016 FINALISTS

 

(in alphabetical order)

Aji Susanto Anom
Giovanni Cocco
Loulou d’Aki
Laura El Tantawy
Annie Flanagan
Dominika Gesicka
Amnon Gutman

 

 

FUJIFILM/YOUNG TALENT AWARD 2016 FINALISTS

 

(in alphabetical order)

Amr Dabees
Igor Elukov
Drew Nikonowicz
Bradley Pearce
Aleksander Raczynski
Micha Siarek
Sara Zanella

 

 

The full essays of the winners and finalists will be published here on BURN over the next few weeks,
as well as a selection of the shortlisted essays. Stay tuned!

 

 

 

EPF 2016 JUDGES

 

(in alphabetical order)

Monica Allende | Photo Editor & Cultural Producer, Screen

Enrico Bossan | Editorial Director, Fabrica

Yumi Goto | Curator, Reminders Photography Stronghold

Jacob Aue Sobol | Photographer, Magnum

Maggie Steber | Photographer, National Geographic

 

 

Judges’ statement:

 

In her project, Annie Flanagan addresses the ages-old tragedy of domestic abuse and rape in a manner that brings her subjects onto a contemporary stage with an updated photographic style and point of view. Her choice of subjects and visual approach make a bold statement in focusing on this continuing war on women from the beginning of time. The work is subtle but powerful. Particularly because this is an ongoing issue that in some societies is on the rise, it is important to find a way to speak to new generations with new kinds of images. In approaching her project in chapters, she manages to focus but also produce a broader brushstroke of ideas. We want to mention the photographer’s project text was well-done, articulate, informative and set the stage for her photographs.

 

In Aleksander Raczynski’s project he casts himself as the main character in a play in search of something, someone who feels a full tilt of emotions and reactions to what he sees and photographs and who he meets. His long series of photographs taken in many different places help him, he says, to understand the world and thus himself. He wanders, with no particular idea in mind, his life and photography a constant confrontation with his emotions. They jettison him closer to his own soul. In his words: “I find it very helpful as what scares me the most is the lack of emotions in life.” Aleksander’s photographs look like memories of one place or another, a memory that might be drawn from childhood, a place where something happened to him, odd and familiar scenes and moments that act as his visual autobiography.

 

 

Previous EPF Winners

 

The 2008 Emerging Photographer Fund grant was awarded to
Sean Gallagher for his essay on the environmental Desertification of China.

The 2009 Emerging Photographer Fund grant was awarded to
Alejandro Chaskielberg for his 8×10 format essay on the Parana River Delta ‘The High Tide’.

The 2010 Emerging Photographer Fund grant was awarded to
Davide Monteleone for his essay ‘Northern Caucasus’.

The 2011 Emerging Photographer Fund grant was awarded to
Irina Werning for her essay ‘Back to the Future’.

In 2012 three Emerging Photographer Fund grants were awarded:
one major to Matt Lutton for his essay ‘Only Unity’ and
two minors to Giovanni Cocco for his essay ‘Monia’ and to Simona Ghizzoni for her essay ‘Afterdark’.

In 2013 four Emerging Photographer Fund grants were awarded:
one major to Diana Markosian for her essay ‘My Father The Stranger’ and
three minors to: Iveta Vaivode for her essay ‘Somewhere on Disappearing Path’,
Oksana Yushko for her essay ‘Balklava: The Lost History’ and
Maciej Pisuk for his essay ‘Under The Skin; Photographs From Brzeska Street’.

In 2014 two Emerging Photographer Fund grants were awarded:
one major to Alessandro Penso for his essay ‘Lost Generation’ and
one minor to: Birte Kaufmann for her essay ‘The Travelers’.

In 2015 the Emerging Photographer Fund was awarded to Danila Tkachenko for ‘Restricted Areas’, and
the FujiFil Young Talent Award to Sofia Valiente for ‘Miracle Village’.

 

 

Editor’s note:

 

I cannot express my thanks enough to Maggie, Monica, Yumi, Jacob and Ernesto. They worked together to finely tune their choices, looked at the finalists from every angle and awarded the EPF grants to the photographers they felt most deserving. Of course, once it got down to the finalists, choices became extremely difficult, but that is a given… and they did an admirable job. Thank you.

 

A heart felt thank you also to Fujifilm for making it possible for the EPF to keep focus on the future generations, the young ones, the ones with a vision already making a mark now… and just might make another jump soon…

 

FujiFilm_Basic-Black

 

Burn Magazine revolves around the EPF. Our most important curatorial contribution
to the oftentimes chaotic landscape of photography today. By choosing a jury whose lifetimes have been spent in looking
at photographs and making photographs, we try to give our Burn readers a distilled version of the best work of all that
flows before their eyes everyday.

 

Most importantly our mission is to give recognition to the finest emerging authors out there and to provide some funding to at least
a few to keep going and to continue making a mark. Our previous winners prove this is not in vain.

 

Many thanks especially to my EPF Burn team of Anton Kusters, Diego Orlando, and Francesca Gennari.
First off , they must deal with me!! Never easy. In all seriousness, they all show amazing dedication to the spirit of
doing something which just feels good. To provide a platform for the up and coming.

 

Special thanks to Susan Meiselas of the Magnum Foundation. Nobody on the planet is more dedicated to allowing new talent to develop.
 
Special thanks also to Michael Loyd Young, EPF funder and BURN Magazine board member.

 

-dah-
 


The Emerging Photographer Fund was created and is directed by David Alan Harvey,
and curated by Anton Kusters & Diego Orlando.