panos skoulidas – death in venice

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Panos Skoulidas

Death in Venice

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“I love the smell of urine in the morning, it reminds me of North Venice beach. The first place in America where a woman could wear a bathing suit in public, a man could go without a hat, where a person could pee in public without being arrested. The place where Kerouac, Burrows and John Wilber spoke while Charlie Parker played saxophone, where Morrison and Krieger pondered the doorway to the other side, where Charlie Chaplin built a ginger bread court for his mother, and W.C. Fields one for himself. Where you could get alcohol during prohibition, heroin during the fifties and sixties, crack in the eighties, and Meth in the new millennium. Where art meets crime. Where Arnold made pumping iron into Gold. Where you can see a man balance a stove on his chin while juggling chain saws. Break-dancing, roller-skating, and of course skate boarding. The slum by the sea, Dog Town.”

– Robin G. Brown

 

 

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Sample spread from “Death in Venice” by Panos Skoulidas

 

 

“Panos did not go to Venice Beach to take pictures. He was already there. There was no escape. Locked down. Stuck. California dreaming.

Click click.

Narcissistic, sarcastic, irreverent, hedonistic, decadent, satiric, ironic, paranoid, and flat out soulful, Panos is at the center of his own photographs. This is a good sign, for he lives inside his own work. Bring the boy another beer.

Death in Venice is a collection, a kaleidoscope, a myriad of mirrors, a massive mind spinning vortex. Get a grip on it. Or not. He doesn’t care.

Click click.”

– David Alan Harvey / Magnum Photos

 

DEATH IN VENICE  by Panos Skoulidas – published by BurnBooks on May, 2015 in an edition of 1000 copies –  dimension: 28cm x 43.2cm, 68 pages.

DEATH IN VENICE can now be ordered here

 

Panos-Skoulidas_Death-in-Venice_DEF-1

 

THANK U NOTE:

Homer, Nietzsche, Zorba, Hunter, Theodoros, Harvey, Frida…. where do I start? EASY, DavId Alan Harvey, my mentor, brother, family 

BTW this book is dedicated to Scotty (vet) and all of the vampires and souls  that create the Venice vortex.

To all Pirates, you know who you are! Thanks for the couches, floors, Bong hits, love, etc..

Each of you are a part of every picture. Carry it with you, as I will forever!

EXTRA LOVE to: Vissaria~ You are the future!!!! Maria~ Strong as a bird, Mom & Dad biggest hug, Kim my awesome wife, and Meredith, my super supportive mother in law… (thank u ALL for endless support……) LOLA~ Not last by any means. My Ghandi, my Buddha, my  meditation, my companion. BURN MAGAZINE CREW~ Anton (THANK YOU FOR OUT OF THIS WORLD DESIGN), Diego YOU DA MAN,  Haik……no words… RYAN! Oh Ryan what would I be without you? and FRANCESCA Gennari the killer associate producer…

PEACE TO ALL!!!!!!! ENJOY!!!!!!!

– PANOS

 

 

DEATH IN VENICE can now be ordered here

 

 

 

 

nicolas enriquez – the bloodline

FujiFilm/Young Talent Award – 2015 Runner Up

 

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FujiFilm/Young Talent Award 2015 runner up

Nicolas Enriquez

The Bloodline

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The Bloodline is a chapter designated by the gang of the Latin Kings to the State of New York. The Latin Kings is one of the largest and most organized gangs in America with more than 35,000 active members.

This Photo Essay focuses on documenting not only the extreme life conditions for the majority of gang members but also the relation between gang members and society. It explores the intimacy and naivety of teenagers who have been pushed by their economic status, racial or social issues to survive in a hostile environment in one of the most developed cities in the world. It also draws attention to the happiness, unity and respect they show each other and the importance of the family and religion in their lives.

As a Colombian, I am aware of the political and social situations of my country, and am familiar with the culture and their way of life. I am drawn to people who have to live in extreme conditions, and the risks they take to be capable of maintaining their economic status. The stressors behind why they create or get involved in gangs and what their purpose is. In my work I endeavor to show my point of view of social and cultural issues, often referencing South and Latin American urban conflicts such as drug dealing, narco-traffic, gangs and corruption.

I feel inspired by the efforts of these teenagers seeking for a community that understands them and supports them, and how they find the answer to this questions in Gangs, a community that forces them to juggle between being a teenager and surviving in the concrete jungle.

Bio

Nicolas Enriquez was born in the city of Cali-Colombia in 1993, he graduated from the Photojournalism and Documentary Photography program at The International center of Photography in 2014.
His most influential work The Bloodline documenting the Latin Kings gang has helped him to develop an interest in Urban conflict, political and human rights issues.
He currently works as a freelance photographer for the New York Daily News and his work has been published in different media outlets such as The New York Times, American Photography, Getty images, PROOF, NY Daily News.

Nicolas Enriquez

 

 

FujiFilm/EPF Young Talent Award is an additional grant for photographers under 25. Using David Alan Harvey’s words “A heart felt thank you also to FujiFilm for making it possible for the EPF to keep focus on the future generations, the young ones, the ones with a vision already making a mark now… and just might make another jump soon…”

 

 

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joshua irwandi – asmat: not a blank canvas

FujiFilm/Young Talent Award – 2015 Runner Up

 

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FujiFilm/Young Talent Award 2015 runner up

Joshua Irwandi

Asmat: Not A Blank Canvas

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Asmat is a tribe of New Guinea discovered not a century ago, notorious for the disappearance of Michael Rockefeller in 1961. However, ever since Indonesia annexed West Papua from The Netherlands, Indonesian government’s transmigration program has brought in an influx of foreigners (from other islands of Indonesia), leading to construction projects, deforestation, and outside influence coming in to Asmat. Consequently, Asmat people are becoming marginalised in their own land. Although Asmat ritual feasts are still taking place with far less frequency, there is religious tension between the Catholic majority of Asmat and Islam brought in by the foreigners. The foreigners own most businesses, which renders the Asmats economically disadvantaged. With increasing number of foreigners coming in per year, by 2030 less than 20% Papuans will cease to exist. Asmat is only one of the many tribes in West Papua.

I was in Asmat in 2013 for 3 weeks, 2 months last year, and recently hired as museum staff at the Asmat Museum in Asmat.

My intention in photographing the Asmat from the very beginning is to raise awareness of what’s happening in Asmat, and to reinvestigate the consequences of development and ‘progress’. We cannot stand oblivious to the change that is rapidly taking place. Change will wipe whatever remains in West Papua. My decision to work in Asmat is because I want to try to engage the Asmat people visually of what’s happening in their land. Asmat is not a blank canvas where outside forces can simply project influence upon them. Asmat have their own way to respond; how, and what their responses are, makes it difficult to predict their future.

Bio

I’m Joshua Irwandi, 23, an Indonesian photographer based in Asmat, West Papua, Indonesia. Starting this year I am working as Museum Staff at the Asmat Museum of Culture of Progress, Agats.

I left Indonesia when I was 16 for high school in Canada (graduated 2010), BA in English Literature at University of Exeter (graduated 2013). While doing BA I spent time mostly on photography; I was photographer at my college paper Exepos’ (nominated Guardian Student Publication of the Year) and designer/photographer for student theatre companies. I interned at the Jakarta Globe in 2011, Kompas in 2011 and 2012, and The Times UK in 2012. I decided to pursue my MA, which began in January 2014, and started photographing Asmat. The photographs from Asmat have won me several workshop opportunities in 2014, namely Adam Broomberg/Oliver Chanarin workshop London, New York Times Portfolio Review NY, Magnum AGM Masterclass NY, Eddie Adams Workshop XVII NY, and VII Photo Masterclass Milan.

Joshua Irwandi

 

 

FujiFilm/EPF Young Talent Award is an additional grant for photographers under 25. Using David Alan Harvey’s words “A heart felt thank you also to FujiFilm for making it possible for the EPF to keep focus on the future generations, the young ones, the ones with a vision already making a mark now… and just might make another jump soon…”

 

 

FujiFilm_Basic-Black

 

 

 

EPF 2015 – the winners

 

 

 

 

EPF 2015 WINNERS

 

Danila Tkachenko, winner – $10,000

Aaron Vincent Elkaim, honorable mention

 

 

FUJIFULM/YOUNG TALENT AWARD 2015 WINNERS

 

Sofia Valiente, winner – $5,000 + FujiFilm camera

Mu Yang, runner up – FujiFilm camera

Aaron Canipe, runner up – FujiFilm camera

Joshua Irwandi, runner up – FujiFilm camera

Nicolas Enriquez, runner up – FujiFilm camera

 

 

EPF 2015 FINALISTS

 

(in alphabetical order)
Javier Arcenillas
Marta Berens
Annie Flanagan
Alvaro Laiz
Sebastian Liste
Paolo Marchetti
Alexander Mendelevich
Metrography (collective)
Emanuele Occhipinti
Raffaele Petralla
Joao Pina
Pablo Piovano
Sarker Protick
Aaron Vincent Elkaim*
Danila Tkachenko**

 

 

FUJIFILM/YOUNG TALENT AWARD 2015 FINALISTS

 

(in alphabetical order)
Aaron Canipe*
Nicolas Enriquez*
Erin Geideman
Joshua Irwandi*
Acacia Johnson
Mariah Leal Paes
David Molina
Charles Roux
Sofia Valiente**
Mu Yang*

 

 

The full essays of the winners and finalists will be published here on BURN over the next few weeks,
as well as the list of the shortlisted selection. Stay tuned!

 

 

EPF 2014 JUDGES

 

(in alphabetical order)

Bieke Depoorter | Photographer, Magnum

Jim Estrin | Editor, New York Times LENS blog

W.M. Hunt | Collector, Curator, Consultant

Evelien Kunst | Director, NOOR Images

Michael “Nick” Nichols | Photographer, Editor at Large, National Geographic

 

 

Previous EPF Winners

 

The 2008 Emerging Photographer Fund grant was awarded to
Sean Gallagher for his essay on the environmental Desertification of China.

The 2009 Emerging Photographer Fund grant was awarded to
Alejandro Chaskielberg for his 8×10 format essay on the Parana River Delta ‘The High Tide’.

The 2010 Emerging Photographer Fund grant was awarded to
Davide Monteleone for his essay ‘Northern Caucasus’.

The 2011 Emerging Photographer Fund grant was awarded to
Irina Werning for her essay ‘Back to the Future’.

In 2012 three Emerging Photographer Fund grants were awarded:
one major to Matt Lutton for his essay ‘Only Unity’ and
two minors to Giovanni Cocco for his essay ‘Monia’ and to Simona Ghizzoni for her essay ‘Afterdark’.

In 2013 four Emerging Photographer Fund grants were awarded:
one major to Diana Markosian for her essay ‘My Father The Stranger’ and
three minors to: Iveta Vaivode for her essay ‘Somewhere on Disappearing Path’,
Oksana Yushko for her essay ‘Balklava: The Lost History’ and
Maciej Pisuk for his essay ‘Under The Skin; Photographs From Brzeska Street’.

In 2014 two Emerging Photographer Fund grants were awarded:
one major to Alessandro Penso for his essay ‘Lost Generation’ and
one minor to: Birte Kaufmann for her essay ‘The Travelers’.

 

 

Editor’s note:

 

I cannot express my thanks enough to Bieke, Evelien, Jim, Bill and Nick. This very fine EPF jury worked collectively so hard and so thoroughly to finely tune their choices… They thought this through very carefully from every angle to award this grant to the photographers most deserving. Of course once it gets down to the finalists, the choices become extremely difficult. This is where they really went to work. Lots of back and forth discussion and yet consensus reached.

 

A heart felt thank you also to FujiFilm for making it possible for the EPF to keep focus on the future generations, the young ones, the ones with a vision already making a mark now… and just might make another jump soon…

 

FujiFilm_Basic-Black

 

Burn Magazine revolves around the EPF. Our most important curatorial contribution
to the oftentimes chaotic landscape of photography today. By choosing a jury whose lifetimes have been spent in looking
at photographs and making photographs, we try to give our Burn readers a distilled version of the best work of all that
flows before their eyes everyday.

 

Most importantly our mission is to give recognition to the finest emerging authors out there and to provide some funding to at least
a few to keep going and to continue making a mark. Our previous winners prove this is not in vain.

 

Many thanks especially to my EPF Burn team of Anton Kusters, Diego Orlando, and Kaya Berne.
First off , they must deal with me!! Never easy. In all seriousness, they all show amazing dedication to the spirit of
doing something which just feels good. To provide a platform for the up and coming.

 

Special thanks to Susan Meiselas of the Magnum Foundation. Nobody on the planet is more dedicated to allowing new talent to develop.

 

-dah-


The Emerging Photographer Fund was created and is directed by David Alan Harvey,
and curated by Anton Kusters & Diego Orlando, with Kaya Lee Berne.

 

 

 

BurnBooks announces the release of “Tell It Like It Is” by David Alan Harvey

 

 

BurnBooks announces “Tell It Like It Is” by David Alan Harvey

 

 

Tell It Like It Is 
by David Alan Harvey

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Published by BurnBooks May 2015
Layout and Design: Anton Kusters and Diego Orlando
Image Color Correction: Paolo Lecca
Production: Michael Courvoisier, Kaya Lee Berne
Offset Printing by Grafiche Antiga, Treviso, Italy
15″ x 22.5″
 

Originally shot In 1967 when David Alan Harvey was just 23 and in graduate journalism school in Missouri. Tell It Like It Is was destined to be re-published. It is a photographic slice of another era, and a small piece of one family’s history in the U.S.

 

 

 tellit_buy  
 
 
 
2015 Edition of Tell It Like It Is
76 pages, 46 Black & White Images
Symbol Tatami white 150 gr
Softcover
10.5″ x 15″
 
 
 
 
TellIt_OrderCollectors
  
Collector’s Edition Box Set
Signed silver gelatin print (hand made by the artist)
Ilford Ilfobrom Galerie Fiber-Based Paper, Grade #3, Glossy – 8″ x 10″

2015 edition of Tell It Like It Is
76 pages, Symbol Tatami white 150 gr – 10.5″ x 15″ 

Original 1967 edition (replica) of Tell It Like It Is
36 pages, binding stapled – 6″x 9″

Original 1967 Contact Sheets (replica)
38 sheets – 8.5″ x 11″

Edition of 150.

 
 

 

 

I went a little bit crazy publishing this book. Just like I did the first time. In 1967, Bryan was six months old and I was spending the last $400 of the family money to go buy film. This time around isn’t any different. I am all in on the publication of Tell It Like It Is.

I say this proudly, yet not boastfully.

My pride is based on giving a percentage of profits to the Liggins family and to set up a scholarship for a minority photographer.

We take the self-publishing idea very seriously around here. I spare no expense in the manufacturing of my work. I just want it right. This makes my books a little more expensive, yet if you look closely you will clearly see the value of a well thought out, well designed, well assembled photo book. We do our best to make each of our books a piece of art.

None of this is possible without my colleagues Anton Kusters and Diego Orlando on design and production; Kaya Lee Berne all around producer, darkroom assistant, and make me get shit done woman, Michael Courvoisier for scanning the original negatives, Michelle Madden Smith for creating our new BurnStore, and my son Bryan for making the book video (and Michelle for editing it) and my other son Erin for helping me find the Liggins family and doing video of the reunion. 

Tell It Like It Is is also a 25 print show, big 60”x40” silver gelatin prints at LOOK3, along with Haenyeo: Angels of the Sea (which is also a new book), along with NO FILTER, prints of some of my Brazil work. So I’ve got my hands full.

In short, we’ll be shipping as fast as we can, but cannot promise your package will go out until after June 15. 

But do come see me at LOOK3. It’s the best U.S. photo fest hang. Down home style. 

I put my heart into Tell It Like It Is in 1967, and I’ve put my heart into it now as well.

– david alan harvey
 

IMG_4675David Alan Harvey and assistant Kaya Lee Berne in his Outer Banks darkroom, 
printing silver-gelatin prints for the Collector’s Edition. Photo by Frank Overton Brown III

 

 

Tell It Like It Is 
by David Alan Harvey

 

 

order

 

Published by BurnBooks May 2015
Layout and Design: Anton Kusters and Diego Orlando
Image Color Correction: Paolo Lecca
Production: Michael Courvoisier, Kaya Lee Berne
Offset Printing by Grafiche Antiga, Treviso, Italy
15″ x 22.5″
 

Originally shot In 1967 when David Alan Harvey was just 23 and in graduate journalism school in Missouri. Tell It Like It Is was destined to be re-published. It is not an epic. It is a photographic slice of another era, and a small piece of one family’s history in the U.S.