Author Archive for burn magazine

Page 3 of 312

Tara Wray – Too Tired for Sunshine

Tara Wray

Too Tired for Sunshine

Too Tired for Sunshine is a photobook that confronts my own struggles with depression by documenting the beauty, darkness, and absurdity of everyday life. The images were made largely in my adopted home of Vermont between 2011-now. They offer a deeply personal interpretation of the Green Mountain State, juxtaposing familiar and picturesque tropes with more surreal, sometimes disquieting, subjects.

 

 

Bio

Tara Wray (b. 1978) is an American photographer, writer, and filmmaker based in rural Vermont. She is a regular contributor to Vice, BUST Magazine, and is photo editor of the literary journal Hobart. She created and curates Some Days Just Are, a collaborative photo series pairing together photographers from around the world to tell their stories simultaneously. Her work has been featured on Vice, Archive Collective Magazine, La Presse, Lenscratch, Humble Arts Foundation, and Ain’t-Bad Magazine, among others, and is held in collections at major institutions including Yale University, University of Notre Dame, and Dartmouth College. Born and raised in Kansas, Wray graduated from NYU with a degree in documentary film. She has directed two feature length documentaries: Manhattan, Kansas (Audience Award, SXSW 2006; Film Society of Lincoln Center) and Cartoon College (Vancouver 2012).

Her photobook, Too Tired for Sunshine, will be published by Yoffy Press in Spring 2018.

Related Links

Tara Wray

João Pina – 46750

A young man rides a horse inside the Morro da Mineira in northern Rio de Janeiro while the city’s financial district can be seen in the background. July 2011.

João Pina

46750

In 2007, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil started the process of an enormous transformation process to host both the 2014 FIFA world cup, and the 2016 summer Olympic games. 
The economy was favorable, due to the surge of commodity prices which Brazil vastly produces. The country turned its eyes toward a huge investment in the sports infrastructure, while the investment in public services such has housing, health or security was minimal. 
In 2016, while the World watched the Olympics, according to the Public Safety Institute of Rio de Janeiro, homicides went up by 20% and robbery went up more then 40%. 
The question that remains in the air is: Why is the price to pay for the major sports events bringing cities to bankruptcy? 
46750 is a visual account of the last decade of the city. A grim portrait of the so-called “wonder city”, with all its contrasts and complexities. 46750 is also the number of homicides that occurred in the metropolitan area of Rio de Janeiro, an average of 13 homicides per day for the decade 2007-2016.
46750 will be João Pina’s third book and will be published on the spring of 2018. The book is currently in pre-sale
 

 

 

Bio

João Pina is a freelance photographer born in Portugal in 1980. He began working as a professional photographer at age eighteen, and graduated from the International Center of Photography’s Photojournalism and Documentary Photography program in New York in 2005. Pina’s photographs have been published in D Magazine, Days Japan, El Pais,Expresso, GEO, La Vanguardia, New York TimesNew YorkerNewsweek, Stern, Time, and Visão, among others.

His work has been exhibited at the Open Society Foundations (New York), International Center of Photography (New York), Point of View Gallery (New York), Howard Greenberg Gallery (New York), King Juan Carlos Center – NYU (New York), Canon Gallery (Tokyo), Museu de Arte Moderna (Rio de Janeiro), Museo de Arte do Rio (Rio de Janeiro), Paço das Artes (São Paulo), Centro de Fotografia (Montevideo), Museo de la Memoria y los Derechos Humanos (Santiago de Chile), Parque de la Memoria (Buenos Aires), Torreão Poente – Museu de Lisboa (Lisbon), KGaleria (Lisbon), the Portuguese Center of Photography (Porto), Visa pour L’Image (Perpignan), and Reencontres d’Arles (Arles).

In 2007, Pina published his first book, Por Teu Livre Pensamento, featuring the stories of twenty-five former Portuguese political prisoners. This project inspired an Amnesty International advertising campaign that earned him a Gold Lion Award in the 2011 Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity, and won the OSF – Moving Walls 21 in 2013. He also received the Estação Imagem grant in 2010, and was a finalist for the Henri Nannen and Care awards in 2011, and the Alexandra Boulat Grant in 2009.

In 2014, he finished his longest personal project, documenting the remants of Operation Condor, a large-scale secret military operation to eliminate political opposition to the military dictatorships in South America during the 1970s, resulting in his second book CONDOR.

His third book 46750, to be published on the spring of 2018, will focus on the ongoing urban violence in Rio de Janeiro and the city’s transformation over the past decade while preparing for the 2014 FIFA World Cup and the 2016 Olympic Games.

He is a faculty member of the International Center of Photography in New York, and a regular lecturer and teacher of photography workshops.

 Currently he is a Nieman Fellow at Harvard University for 2017/2018.

Related Links

Joao Pina

Caleb Stein – Down by the Hudson

Caleb Stein

Down by the Hudson

[ EPF 2017 – FUJIFILM / YOUNG TALENT WINNER ]

 

“Down by the Hudson” is an ongoing project, a record of my walks and interactions, mostly along a 3-mile strip of Main Street, in Poughkeepsie, NY. Poughkeepsie is a small city, population around 32,736. Approximately 19% live below the poverty line. 

 

 

Recent years have brought a great deal of economic hardship to this lively, character-filled place. Some people attribute this to the downsizing of IBM’s local headquarters. Others say that fault lies with the Poughkeepsie Galleria Mall, or the additions to the highway system, both of which have de-emphasized the role of Main Street. Some blame local colleges Vassar, Marist, the Culinary Institute for their lack of engagement with the community. In any case, Poughkeepsie is still a beautiful, resilient city with beautiful, interesting people. Lots to learn from them, no question about it.

 

 

I plan to continue documenting my interactions with Poughkeepsie and its communities for the next 12 months. I’m working as a busser at a local restaurant to pay my bills, but – as is the case for lots of young people with a passion for art and photography – money is tight and the amount of hours that I can devote to this project are unfortunately not as many as I would like or hope for. The Emerging Photographer Fund grant would be an amazing opportunity to devote more time to developing this project, which one day I’d love to make into a book.

 

 

Short Bio

Caleb Stein, (b.1994) graduated from Vassar College in 2017 with a degree in art history. He has interned at Christie’s Auction House and for Magnum photographer Bruce Gilden (2015-2017). He continues to run Gilden’s Instagram and is currently in pre-production on a documentary on Gilden. His work has been featured in Hamburger Eyes, The Heavy Collective, Burn Magazine, LensCulture, and Creative Quarterly and has been exhibited in group shows in Portland and Los Angeles. He lives in Poughkeepsie, NY with his partner.

 

Related Links

 

http://caleb-stein.squarespace.com

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The Emerging Photographer Fund is supported by generous donors to the Magnum Foundation

Magnum Foundation

Karim El Maktafi – Hayati

Karim El Maktafi

Hayati

[ EPF 2017 – YOUNG TALENT AWARD / FUJIFILM FINALIST ]

 

Hayati (“my life” in Arabic) is a visual journal realized exclusively with a smartphone. Hayati reflects on my identity as a second-generation Italian. Son of immigrants, born and raised in Italy, balance between two realities that at first sight might seem incompatible. To produce this story, I became both its subject and its object. I was born in Desenzano del Garda, a village near Brescia, Italy, from Moroccan parents. Growing up between two worlds forced me to sharpen my gaze and to compare these perspectives which often diverge from each other.

 

 

Embracing a single identity is not easy; feeling out of place or like an odd cultural hybrid often happens. Yet, while trying to define this identity, one understands the privilege of “standing on a doorstep” at the edge of two environments. One can decide who to be, where to belong, or to create new ties, while keeping alive the experiences learnt along the path. One must learn to juggle multiple languages, cultural taboos, references, prohibitions, and learn to teach those who are not also standing on the doorstep. I had to travel inside my own life and family. I faced doubts, hesitations and afterthoughts, but I realized an honest portrait of how I have lived until today.

 

 

The most interesting aspect of this story – of my story – is the creation of a less restricted reality. One that is undefined, in which various beliefs and experiences thrive and form a unique harmony. Hayati was made between Italy and Morocco during a year-long scholarship at Fabrica, Benetton Group?s communication research centre based in Treviso, Italy.

 

 

Short Bio

Karim El Maktafi is an Italian-Moroccan photographer born in Desenzano del Garda (IT) in 1992. In 2013 he graduated from the Italian Institute of Photography in Milan. He has collaborated with several photographers in various fields: commercial, fashion, editorial production and major advertising campaigns. His photographic research explores the concept of identity through through documentary methods and portraiture. His work has been presented in exhibitions at the Brescia Photo Festival, the Festival of Ethical Photography, Fotografia Europea, Fotoleggendo, Area35 Art Gallery in Milan and YES Collective in Auckland, and has been featured in magazines such as Internazionale, Vice, Topic stories, Playboy Italia, C-41 and Spam, among others. He has also received the Alessandro Voglino Young Talent Prize at the FRAME Foto Festival. Between 2016 and 2017, during his residency at Fabrica, Karim realized the project “Hayati”.

 

Related Links

 

karimelmaktafi.com

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The Emerging Photographer Fund is supported by generous donors to the Magnum Foundation

Magnum Foundation

Alexey Shlyk – The Appleseed Necklace

Alexey Shlyk

The Appleseed Necklace

[ EPF 2017 – FINALIST ]

Every time I think of my country (Belarus), I am reminded of how wonderfully resourceful and creative the people are. Probably those qualities were inherited – together with tolerance – from the Soviet period. As I was born in 1986, I was a citizen of the Soviet Union for part of my early childhood and I still remember my passport with the hammer and sickle on it and the empty racks in the stores.

 

 

This series is based on once predominant DIY culture in the country of my origin that developed in the time of my childhood. As I stage my photographs today, I refer to my memories and nostalgic feelings for the things that I have seen and heard in the past, events that I have participated in.

 

 

In the Appleseed Necklace I am talking about creativity, craftsmanship, diligence and typical recycling that were natural to the people living in conditions of constant shortages. It was a time when one had either to find a way to “snatch” what was needed or to make it out of the accessible materials.

Although today this lifestyle is more often seen in domestic decorations, I am trying to revive in my photographs what once was a vital necessity.

 

 

Short Bio

 

Born in 1986 in Minsk, Belarus, Shylk graduated in 2008 with honors from the Belarus State University, specializing in Mathematics. Since starting to work in Fine Arts photography in 2009, Shlyk has had solo exhibitions in Belarus (Museum of Modern Fine Art, Minsk), Russia (Russian Museum of Decorative and Applied Art, Moscow and Erarta Museum of Contemporary Art, Saint-Petersburg), China (Duloun Museum of Modern Art, Shanghai) and participated in several international photo festivals (Breda Photo 2016 in Netherlands, Format 2017 in Derby and Belfast Photo Festival the UK). In 2017 his work was shortlisted for Prix Levallois and Shlyk became a laureate of Carte Blanche at Paris Photo. He is currently enrolled in the master’s program at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts Antwerp with Bert Danckaert and Geert Goiris. Today he lives and works in Antwerp, Belgium.

 

Related Links

 

alexeyshylk.com

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The Emerging Photographer Fund is supported by generous donors to the Magnum Foundation

Magnum Foundation

Jordan Gale – It Is What It Is

Jordan Gale

It Is What It Is

[ EPF 2017 – YOUNG TALENT AWARD / FUJIFILM FINALIST ]

 

I was born in Cedar Rapids, Iowa; the only child to a single mother who since before I was born has struggled with a combination of drug abuse and poverty. When I was nine, our house was raided by the police on the suspicion that drugs were sold there. After this incident, we were forced to move and my mother attempted to overcome her addiction to methamphetamine. For several months, she slept most of the day, forcing me to partially raise myself. I always assured my mother that her addiction was never a source of shame or resentment, but this promise became more and more a lie as time went on.

 

 

My mother never quit, and in high school I acquired my own dependencies to drugs as means to escape. In retrospect, I now accept that I was angry, and wanted to be anywhere besides in my own reality. I resented my mother’s addiction and my own place in the world.

 

 

“It Is What It Is” acts as a form of therapy. An autobiographical visual diary where I confront the people and decisions of my past. I embrace the fact that my decisions were necessary in order to gain hindsight. Stagnancy and fear create a mold and some friends and family close to my heart blissfully lay in this mold forever. I was lucky; for many this cycle is never broken. By photographing the people and scenes most familiar to me I can begin to accept that these scenes are an aspect of the world. These photographs for me often stir up more questions than they provide answers for. One fact I’ve learned that I hold close is that, I’m in no way content at the moment. But, I am proud of where I’ve come from.

 

 

Short Bio

I was born and raised in Cedar Rapids, Iowa and fell in love with the art of photography in a high school darkroom class when I was sixteen. After high school I went on to receive my Associates of Arts degree from Kirkwood Community College, and am now an undergraduate student at The University of Iowa. Since arriving at The University of Iowa I have studied under photographers such as Danny Wilcox Frazier, and Jeff Rich. I aim to create intimate personal projects documenting the lives of those closest to myself still living in Cedar Rapids and neighboring communities. Photographs from my various projects have been featured in Lenscratch, Photographer?s Forum, and have been awarded by The Iowa Press Association, and The Associated Collegiate Press.

 

Related Links

 

jordangalephotos.com

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The Emerging Photographer Fund is supported by generous donors to the Magnum Foundation

Magnum Foundation

Jeroen Bocken – The Celebrated Remedy for the Cure of Disorder

Jeroen Bocken

The Celebrated Remedy for the Cure of Disorder

[ EPF 2017 – YOUNG TALENT AWARD / FUJIFILM RUNNER UP ]

 

With his interest in the glorifying and influential nature of photographs and images, Jeroen Bocken investigates the increasingly prominent role of hyper-idealised aesthetics in today’s world. Bocken is fascinated by natural science, human criteria and calculations and the limitations of the camera. He combines a variety of digital processes with natural patterns and algorithms. This experimental and associative process results in illogically constructed images. The photographer alternates these with classic documentary images, often iconic and familiar, to create an ambiguous context.

 

 

The interplay between real and constructed images requires vigilance. By playing these extreme methods off against each other, Bocken reminds us that an image never really shows the ultimate reality but is only capable of representing it. The image is a documentation, a snapshot and a notion of reality. It has the unequivocal power to steer our interpretation and perception in one direction.

 

 

New digital advances, such as 3D renders, mean that hyper-constructed images are being unleashed on the world at a dizzying rate. These immaculate, aesthetic and fabricated renderings are increasingly wrong-footing us and impacting on our perceptions. It is only with effort that we can distinguish the “picture perfect” from reality. Bocken is very intrigued by this ironic and surrealistic fact. By twisting and distorting the technical processing of his own images, and embracing the faults, Bocken explores the boundaries of our sense of reality.

Written by: Eléa De Winter

 

 

Short Bio

Jeroen Bocken (Heusden-Zolder, Belgium, 1994) lives and works in Antwerp, Belgium. Recently he graduated as a Master at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Antwerp. (2016-2017). In April 2017, he was selected with the project ‘Changing Perspective: A multi-Camera Experience’ for the ‘Braakland’ project organized by the Foto Museum in Antwerp (FoMu). After his graduation show in the ‘Extra City’ (Antwerp, Belgium), his master project was published by Sjoerd Knibbeler on the website of the German contemporary photography magazine ‘Der-Greif’. His work is also on display in the ‘Van Der Mieden Gallery’ (Antwerp, Belgium) and ‘Kunst In Huis’ (Gent, Belgium). Thanks to his selection for the .tiff-magazine of the FoMu he got the opportunity to talk and show his master project in the FoMu and in ‘De Brakke Grond’ (Amsterdam, The Netherlands). As the biggest focus for the future, Jeroen received an invitation from the BredaPhoto festival to create a solo exposition for ‘BredaPhoto 2018’.

 

Related Links

 

jeroenbocken.com

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The Emerging Photographer Fund is supported by generous donors to the Magnum Foundation

Magnum Foundation

Manon Lanjouère – Bleu Glacé

Manon Lanjouère

Bleu Glacé

[ EPF 2017 – YOUNG TALENT AWARD / FUJIFILM FINALIST ]

 

Bleu Glacé is a cabinet of curiosity, a “scientist” study synthetically rebuilding the Icelandic landscape. The use of synthetic material is to question our daily use of plastics, resins and polymers in an exponential way, and how it can change the geological landscape of the surrounding world in a long term. If Iceland magnetizes our attention, it is essentially because of its geology.

“Those landscapes are a wonderful geological lesson, the La Redoute catalog of the volcanic and ice form,” wrote Michel Tournier in his novel, Les Météores.

 

 

Bleu Glacé is this catalog of landscapes that everybody imagines to meet in Iceland, a catalog for an immobile traveller, a lounge traveller.

 

 

The imagination makes the object we’re thinking about and desiring appears before our very eyes in order to take possession of it.

The resulting image is an interiority synthesis, rebuild in studio. The object is absent but all of its qualities are in front of us, the impression is here, as well as the characters certainly looking like human beings but who definitively are characters without any intentionality.

In those objects that I produce, everybody is free to see a waterfall, an iceberg, a plastic bag or polystyrene. The imitation is only partial, as only few components are replicated. However those components are sufficient to give the form a representative value. The concept is then appearing.

 

 

The images created this way summon and question the “primary ardour of water, wind, clouds, and sheer colours projected on the sky and the horizons” that Samivel describes in his book L’Or de l’Islande.

Bleu Glacé has for ambition to represent this mystical elsewhere, land still unknown.

 

Short Bio

Manon was born in 1993. She lives and works in Paris. After receiving an undergraduate in Art History at the Sorbonne University in Paris, she decided to dedicate herself fully into photography and joined Gobelins School of Image in 2014 from which she graduated top of her class in 2017. Through a parallele evolution among a theater in Paris, her practice of photography is characterised by directing and settings. Her work influenced by litterature is focusing to depict fictional worlds. Worlds in which she tries to understand the interraction between the landscape ant the human.

Her work bleu Glacé has been exhibited in 2017 in several festivals in France (Itinéraire des photographes voyageurs in Bordeaux, Festival la Gacilly in la Gacilly, les Rencontres d’Arles in Arles, Nuits photographiques de Pierrevert in Pierrevert, les Rencontres photographiques du 10eme in Paris) and was a finalist of the Price QPN (Nantes, France) and a finalist of the Bourse du Talent Studio.

 

Related Links

 

manonlanjouere.com

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The Emerging Photographer Fund is supported by generous donors to the Magnum Foundation

Magnum Foundation

Ian Hananto – Futile

Ian Hananto

Futile

[ EPF 2017 – YOUNG TALENT / FUJIFILM RUNNER UP ]

The project is a reflection on my question about happiness. People said that everybody needs a dream, so they could see something to pursue in life, and a dream was one of the sources of happiness. On the way pursuing their dream, some could get what they want and some could not. I did enjoy the process, but I never felt close to my dream, it always went further. It was a long run, and we needed to take a rest sometime. While we rested, we could see our friends still ran strong and passed us. We could also see that we left a lot of things behind, home and family. I started thinking, “Is it the cost for my dream?” I lost friends, not because I was bad, but they also had something to catch, and I lost my family, I left them behind for something to which I could not even get closer. Whose dream is it? Who tells me to have a dream? Why do I listen to them so much? Is it the dream I am? If only I could choose my own dream, my own happiness, would my life be better?

 

 

Short Bio

Ian Hananto (b.1992) is a photography enthusiast born and living in Solo, Indonesia. Since 2013, he has pursued photography as self-healing for his bad experiences with his past. Exploring the darkness of his life affected by his fear and failure on his own dreams in order to accept it. In 2016 he received the chance to attend Angkor Photo Workshop in Cambodia mentored by Newsha Tavakolian and Sim Chi Yin.

 

Related Links

 

ianhananto.wordpress.com

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The Emerging Photographer Fund is supported by generous donors to the Magnum Foundation

Magnum Foundation

Joel Karppanen – Finnish Pastoral

Joel Karppanen

Finnish Pastoral

[ EPF 2017 – YOUNG TALENT AWARD / FUJIFILM FINALIST ]

 

Georg Simmel wrote about the relieving power of the ruins. According to him the ruins help us to appreciate everything “incomplete, shapeless and what shatter the frames”.

Finnish Pastoral is a photo series that offers its viewers new means to indeed shatter the set up models we have for perceiving our surroundings. It is a story of the village of Karinkanta, in the region of Northern Ostrobothnia, with a population of just under 200 people: a ruin yet to come. It gives an honest look beyond romantic nationalism, into Finnish countryside and the changes it is facing in the 2010’s postindustrial era when not only the reformation of livelihood, urban-rural fusion and migration, but also disparity, externality and echo chambers keep the countryside in a constant tension.

 

 

Almost every Finn, including me, has their roots on the countryside so we tend to have a pretty black and white mental image on reality. I have followed the daily life in the village for over two years in order to redefine my relationship with countryside. Therefore the series is also a study about the modern humans yearn for the rural life.

 

 

In Karinkanta nothing but everything happens and my democratic camera captures that all timeless stagnation. The in-depth personal series consist of understated portraits, landscapes, frozen moments and details made on medium format camera.

Without any nostalgia Finnish Pastoral paints a portrait of the bygone Finnish Dream.

 

Short Bio

Joel Karppanen (b. 1993) is a self-taught Finnish artist whose photographs and videos, conversing on topics around human environment, common people and the urban-rural dichotomy, stem from the tradition of social realism. He is strongly influenced by literature and cinema. When working, he strives to find magic in moments most would describe as ordinary. In 2017 Karppanen received Young Hero / Jouko Lehtola Foundation Award for a Young Documentary Photographer. His works can be found in various public and private collections. Karppanen lives and works in Northern Finland.

 

Related Links

 

joelkarupanen.com

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The Emerging Photographer Fund is supported by generous donors to the Magnum Foundation

Magnum Foundation