Author Archive for burn magazine

mike young – beer, bait & ammo

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Michael Loyd Young

Beer, Bait & Ammo

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A SOUTHERNER…by definition is an American who lives in the south…It’s more than that…from Texas to the Carolina’s the south is a way of life. Considered Rednecks, Bubbas and Good Old Boys they live by an unwritten code.
If you kill it you grill it, if you catch it you fry it, if you meet someone in a bar you buy them a beer. An outsider is not a stranger, he’s your neighbor.
Music still comes out of jukeboxes in the Ice houses and honky tonks. Bait shops that sell everything from beer to pickled eggs dot the landscape from one end to the other. Motor Courts and RV Parks welcome travelers who venture away from the franchised interstates. Two lane black top roads stretch across the south connecting the small towns main streets where Family owned diners serve home cooked meal with a smile.
American flags are proudly displayed on store fronts and school yards. Freedom has a special meaning and change doesn’t come easy. Most are desperately holding on to their past..this is the South…my backyard.

-Michael Loyd Young-

 

Commentary by Diego Orlando Photo Editor BurnMagazine

“A Southerner in the South taking pictures of the South. This how I see Mike’s book and this is has been my first impression when I had the chance to see the journey at its earlier stage.  Mike’s five year journey took him from the tip of Texas to the Florida Everglades. For me – as European – has been a surprise. Stereotypes are among the most used key to pretend to understand the reality we do not know – and I was not an exception. So being dragged with pictures into a lifestyle so faraway from my own world, made me curious. And I started to look beside the images.. what emerges is a culture explored with no judgment, without overwriting it, without filters. Way more than a diary of a journey. No, a real exploration done by one of the subjects photographed there.. That’s why this book is so authentic: Mike is the photographer, but he could be one of the subjects, it could be one of the fishermen or one of the hunters on the frames easy to find in many of the bars there. Tones and lights, composition and places.. everything contributes to picture the South in a way I have never seen before.”  Diego Orlando – BB&A Curator

 

see  the interview  between David Alan Harvey & Michael Loyd Young about BB&A

 

SOFTCOVER version




HARDCOVER version




 

 

Bio

Michael Loyd Young is a photographer based in Texas, travelling from there all around the world. His main work focuses on exploring the Southern part of the U.S. through the daily life of people.

BLUES, BOOZE & BBQ, published by Powerhouse Books. B,B, & BBQ won the Mississippi Institute of Arts and Letters Award for photography.

CHANGES IN LATITUDE, published by Burn Books, was released in June 2012.

BEER, BAIT & AMMO release date March 2014 published by Burn Books. BB&A documents the southern half of the United States, or the “South”. A world of its own where change comes slow and the right to live the way you choose is a way of life.

Recent exhibits include Photo Week Washington, DC — Houston Photo Fest — Powerhouse Arena, Brooklyn –Delta Blues Museum, Clarksdale — Rouen, France — Lille, France — Vannes Jazz Festival, France — Rennes, France — Sydney, Australia

Michael lives in Texas.

 

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Michael Loyd Young

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sheila zhao – komorebi

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Sheila Zhao

Komorebi

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To be completely honest, I don’t believe that I lead a life particularly out of the ordinary. Most days are a series of self-prescribed routines and social interactions with a self-prescribed group of people that passes peacefully and quietly. I recognize that I have been bestowed many blessings in my life, of course, and have the privilege of calling many wonderful people my friend, both of which I’m tremendously grateful for. However, I am also aware that day-to-day or month-to-month, there are not many happenings or stories that I can tell which are of marked interest to anyone other than those who know me. I think it is because of that, consciously or subconsciously, life’s smaller moments have always interested me more. The French author, Georges Bernanos, was quoted to have said: “Little things seem nothing, but they give peace, like meadow flowers which individually seem odorless but all together perfume the air.”

Komorebi is a personal series that I have been photographing since 2011, exploring these small moments of life, which are continuously at play around us. Seemingly mundane moments are for me tiny seconds-long scenes to be appreciated. They are seconds of mystery, longing, love, flight, humor, whimsy – they are the scenes of life. Komorebi is a Japanese word, which means sunlight that filters through the leaves of trees. Like the soft patches of light that comes through the leaves above, this series is my own meditation and subsequent collection of the quieter moments of life that has made my otherwise ordinary life quite extraordinary.

 

Bio

Sheila Zhao is a photographer based in between Shanghai and Beijing, China. She has worked on documentary and reporting projects around Asia. Her work has appeared in publications such as BusinessWeek, GlobalPost, and Globe and Mail.

 

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Sheila Zhao 

pierfrances cocelada – japan i wish i knew your name

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Pierfrancesco Celada

Japan I wish I knew your name

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During a brief visit to Japan I was soon fascinated by the isolation and loneliness I was feeling in the streets. It started as a personal journey, a foreigner traveling in an alien environment. However, while observing people, it was clear that even locals were not able to interact successfully.

The Tokyo-Nagoya-Osaka Megalopolis, also called Taiheiyō Belt is a unique example of urban agglomeration with an estimated population of over 80 million people. Despite this incredibly high number of chances to interact, it seems that society is moving in the opposite direction. If, in small societies, people have more of an active social role, with multiple connections and greater effect on the community; in a larger society some people struggle to communicate, or tend to maintain close contact with only a small number of the closest friends or family members. Some people tend to privilege other communicative systems offered by modern media and tools; others have an even more extreme approach.

“Nobody is ‘together’ in his work.” Ueyama Kazuki

The purpose of this investigation was to create awareness and highlight the problems that modernization and the rapid changes in the environment create in our lives. Is it still important to be, or feel, part of a group? Do we feel part of the environment? Are we alone in the crowd?

I am currently crowd-funding to produce the photobook Hitoride (Literally by Yourself; Alone) based on the project.

 

Bio

Pierfrancesco Celada (b.1979, Italy), after completing a PhD in Biomechanics is now concentrating his attention on a long-term project on life in Modern Megalopolis.In 2011 he won the Ideastap and MagnumPhoto Photographic Award and interned at Magnum Photo.  His work has been exhibited internationally and his projects published on Newsweek, Times Lightbox, Amica, D-LaRepubblica among others. He is currently working on the second chapter of Modern Megalopolis: “People Mountain People Sea” exploring life in Chinese Megacities.

 

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Christophe viseux- camel race

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Christophe Viseux

Camel Race

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This ongoing essay shot at the Al Wathba race track near Abu Dhabi during the finale week of the racing season in March 2014 aims to depict one of the oldest, yet very active parts of the Emirati and Arab tradition: the camel race. A flourishing industry, camel races serve as a social gathering for many locals and curious visitors. While betting is illegal in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) in accordance to the Islamic texts, significant money prizes and endowments, such as brand new SUVs are given away to the winning owners as incentives.

Underage, lightweight jockeys traditionally mounted the finest racing camels, in order to achieve a top speed. The rise in popularity of this prosperous industry had a perverse effect, by increasing child trafficking, originating from South Asia and Africa. Following the international strain stemming from human rights activists, the UAE President Sheikh Khalifa bin Zayed Al Nahyan signed in 2005 the Law No.15, banning the employment of underage camel jockeys. As a substitute, small and inexpensive remote controlled robots can now be found mounted on the humps of the camels. According tp the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), more than a thousand children received assistance from local authorities and organizations before being repatriated to their home countries.

 

Bio

Christophe Viseux is a freelance photographer based between Paris and Dubai.

 

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Christophe Viseux

 

stephen dock – our day will come – northern ireland (‘tiocfaidh àr là’)

Emerging Photographer Fund – 2014 Finalist

 

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Stephen Dock

Our Day Will Come – Northern Ireland ( ‘Tiocfaidh àr là’ )

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The bald old days of IRA attacks seem distant. The former fighters put their weapons down and are now Sinn Fein members of local parliament. However through the town center, the wall that separates the two neighborhoods of Falls Road and Shankill Road is still there and apparently for a long time.
The economic hardship weakens little by little the foundations of a society that seemed to have put its accursed history behind.

Today many young persons draw near the Republicans movements. As a result the ‘New IRA’ is created on July 2007, opposes Sinn Fein and speaks out about the treachery and the gentrification of the latter. Meanwhile the Orangemen are feeling let down by the British government and think its opens to any compromise with the Sinn Fein for maintaining social peace.

I found historical references used by both parties only by reading books. Young Northern Irish of the same generation as mine, Catholics as Protestants, didn’t know the Troubles, but get very concerned about those events and even reopen the conflict.

I noticed the difference between their life and mine, which led me to undertake this project, richer than a journalistic one.

When I first came in Belfast from September to October 2012, Loyalists celebrated the centennial of the Ulster Covenant. Besides the political tensions that used to appear during that kind of event, the town center appeared to me as a reflect of the economic hardship that affects the whole Northern Irish people, whatever their religion.
Nevertheless, the Troubles are rising up in the different neighborhoods: paintings on walls of Falls Roads celebrate IRA heroes, Union flags can be seen at the windows of Shankill Road, and even tattoos marking some young persons are references to an epoch they didn’t know.

 

Bio

Stephen’s early works were exhibited at the Tbilissi Photo Festival and his work on Syria at the VISA pour l’image Festival. In 2008 he decides to leave for Caracas and focuses on the daily life of Venezuela’s public hospitals. In 2011 he travels several times to Palestine. Later he decides to fly to Aleppo in Syria and follow the Rebels in their fight for freedom. He’ll return in 2012 after having covered the Egyptian presidential election. He then goes to Gaza in order to witness the destructions caused by the Pillar of Defense Operation launched by the Israeli Army on 14 November. In 2013 he flies to Mali before heading East on the Mauritanian border and to the Southwest of the country. In 2014 he’s covering the CAR conflict when France decides to initiate the Sangaris Operation and send troops. Continuing his work on the Syrian conflict he then goes to Lebanon to review the consequences of the nearby civil war from the refugee camps to the religious clashes of Tripoli’s districts.

 

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Stephen Dock

 

 

 

 

annalisa natali murri – then the sky crashed down upon us

Emerging Photographer Fund – 2014 Finalist

 

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EPF 2014 finalist

Annalisa Natali Murri

Then The Sky Crashed Down Upon Us

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“Give me water, I beg you – give me water – I heard a girl near me imploring for water – We were a few blocked under the ruins. Some of us died, I’ve seen them dying. It had been about three days since the collapse, we were still trapped there. We didn’t know if we would all have died down there. Then I saw the girl trying to bite the neck of a corpse at her side, with her last strength, to suck and drink its blood. I have no words to describe what I saw. When I was rescued, after 4 days, she was dead”. Imran Hossain, 48, sewing operator for Phantom Apparels at the 3rd floor of Rana Plaza, tries to bring his mind back to last year, April 24th, when everything changed for him and nearly other 2500 survivors. One year has passed after the accident, but that hell keep reliving relentlessly in the memory of those who entered the building that black morning.
The trauma is overwhelming and is having a long-term impact on psychological well-being of these people. Still hundreds of people suffer from invisible, intangibles wounds. Many are no longer able to sleep at night nor can hear the slightest noise. Many others suffer panic attacks, memory losses, hear continuously mourning voices imploring help or even see dead workers laying beside them.
The tragedy and pain are far from over.
The intention of the project was hence to draw out the invisible, psychological aftermath of the disaster, focusing on PTSD affectd victims and their struggle to conduct a normal life. Portraits of survivors, relatives of the victims and rescue workers try to give shape to their fears and memories in a chaotic and disorienting merge of their own ghosts, derived from the trauma, which everyday and night threaten their minds.

 

Bio

Annalisa Natali Murri (1982), freelance photograher, approached for the first time to photography at age 27, while attending Architectural and Urban Photography School in Valencia (Spain).
After completing her studies in engineering, soon she began to alternate her work to photography, focusing on personal research works and documentary projects, mainly inspired by social issues and their psychological consequences. Her works have been awarded in several international contests, including 70th and 71st POYi. In 2014 she was selected as an attendee for LOOKbetween mentorship program. She’s currently based in Bologna, Italy.

 

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alejandro cegarra – the other side of the tower

Emerging Photographer Fund – 2014 Finalist

 

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EPF 2014 finalist

Alejandro Cegarra

The Other Side Of The Tower

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The tower of David is a skyscraper located in downtown Caracas, Venezuela. The structure is 195 meters high, consists of two towers, and contains 46 floors. Construction began in 1990, but after a devastating economic crisis hit Venezuela in 1994, construction was abandoned. The building was 60% complete. 13 years later, in 2007, construction began again. This time however, it was not for its original purpose. Instead of office spaces, approximately 2,000 families invaded the space illegally.

According to the latest census taken by the inhabitants, there are around 1,300 families currently living there. The Tower of David has become an emblematic symbol of the city of Caracas. It represents the hopes of Caracas to remain a major economic center, and the failure to do so.

In this same way, the Tower of David has come to represent Venezuela as a whole. The Tower has a reputation for harboring the most dangerous of criminals; ironically, the inhabitants are drawn to the Tower due to its security. For them, the Tower is their part in the Bolivarian Revolution. Their way of life is a fight against the social parameters in which they are viewed as a dysfunctional community.

The Tower remains a closed society, as they are afraid of being discriminated against, because of their living arrangements. While the take over of the Tower, and their way of life remain controversial, the reality is that the inhabitants are simply people who are searching for a sense of belonging, and a place to call home.

 

Bio

Alejandro Cegarra was born in 1989, in Caracas, Venezuela, which is the city he still calls home.

In 2012 he started filling in for other photographers at the largest newspaper in Venezuela, ‘Ultimas Noticias’ or ‘Latest News’.  Since November of 2013, Alejandro has been working as a stringer for Associated Press, also works with Vice news and Al Jazeera magazine.

In early 2014 he was selected to exhibit in the PhotoEspana Festival, and chosen by the Magnum Photo Agency as part of the ’30 Under 30′ contest.

His series ‘The Other Side of the Tower of David’ won 3rd place in the Sony World Photography Awards in the ‘Contemporary Issues’ category, winner of the Leica Oscar Barnack Newcomer Award and the winner of the Ian Parry Scholarship 2014.

His work ‘The other side of the Tower’ has been exhibit in England, France, Germany, Spain, Brazil and Venezuela.

 

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dominic bracco ii – aqui vivimos

Emerging Photographer Fund – 2014 Finalist

 

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Dominic Bracco II

Aqui Vivimos

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My interest in Honduras started nearly seven years ago when I found a Honduran woman laying under a mesquite in South Texas near where I grew up. She’d been separated from her group and was lost out there. She’d been traveling for three months. The rancher told me to back away from her because she was sick while he dialed the Border Patrol. She begged me to help her, but I didn’t know how I could. I was already a journalist. My uncle had been in prison for trafficking. I thought to myself, “What kind of place would drive someone to come all this way risk death here in this desert?” Seven years later a friend and I took our savings and finally went. What we found was as beautiful as it was terrifying.

The tiny country of 8 million is the world’s most violent country. Gangs control entire cities. Campesinos war with corporate funded paramilitary groups in the east. Warring cartels massacre entire villages in La Mosquita. In the capital Tegucigalpa violence has become more sporadic and faceless. Random crime has increased. Car jacking, robberies, and assaults are a daily occurrence. San Pedro Sula, the country’s industrial center, sees an average of 19 murders a day.

The normalcy of violence in current Honduran society is extremely troubling and yet it is understandable. As a journalist who has covered violence for five years, there is something unnerving in its consistency.

Honduras is one of the most under reported stories of our time. Those stories that are done often ignore the root causes: deep political rifts that mimic those of earlier Central American wars, widespread poverty, extreme gloves off capitalism, private foreign interest, and the extreme corruption it produces. Aqui Vivimos explores these ideas and looks at daily life, the contrast between beauty and horror, and the often-surreal landscapes, and personalities it produces.

 

 

Bio

Dominic Bracco II explores the effects of global economics on local communities. Although he works internationally, Dominic’s work often returns to document the effects of Mexican and North American policies on the Texas / Mexico border region where he was raised. He has degrees in journalism and Spanish literature from The University of Texas at Arlington. Past clients include The New York Times Magazine, Smithsonian Magazine, The Wall Street Journal, and The Washington Post. Dominic is also a founding member of the collective Prime. He is based in Mexico City.

 

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camilla ferrari

camilla

Choonhwa Ko, 67

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Choonhwa Ko, 67, has been free diving for 50 years in the waters of Jeju Island, S Korea. She can even now hold her breath for over two minutes and go 30 feet down in search of abalone, squid, and conch. It’s a dangerous job. Two Haenyeo died yesterday at sea in the area where I am shooting. Still the Haenyeo are a lively cheerful bunch where a sense of destiny prevails.#SouthKorea #Haenyeo

ditte haarlov johnsen – maputo diary 2000 – 2013

Emerging Photographer Fund – 2014 Finalist

 

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Ditte Haarlov Johnsen

MAPUTO DIARY. 2000 – 2013.

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I grew up in Mozambique. My parents moved there just after independence, drawn by an atmosphere of hope and confidence in the future. At my kindergarten I would stand on the roof shouting long live Frelimo, the liberation party, and down with the armed bandits. Already then the civil war was catching on.

My childhood was spent roaming around the streets with friends; there were no cars driving as fuel was impossible to get. I was just as good a dancer as any of the other kids on my block, but still I longed to belong for real. Unlike the others, I didn’t have a family member that had been killed in the war. My parents had chosen to come there; and they could just as easily choose to leave again.

As a teenager I moved back to Denmark with my father. My mother and youngest sister stayed in Maputo. Since then I’ve spent summers in Maputo. It was one of these summers when I took my first photo course.
In 2000 I met two young men on the street. They were clearly homosexual, and it was the first time in my life that I had seen it so openly out on the streets of Maputo. The next two weeks were spent with Ingracia and Antonieta, and their intimate circle of friends. I scratched the surface of their lives; the Sisters, they called themselves. It became a photo series; and without me knowing it at the time, it was also the start of Maputo Diary. Over the years I returned and kept on photographing the Sisters. We became part of each other’s lives. Many have died along the way. And the pictures became more and more about my own life in Maputo.

Since its vulnerable and innocent beginning, Maputo Diary has become a monument over life lived between different cultures, friendships and people that are no longer here. With my pictures I get under the skin of people who live their lives in hardship. With my camera I insist on intimacy in the pain. When death is omnipresent life shines sharp and intensely.
Maputo Diary consists of approximately 80 images and text.

 

Bio

EDUCATION
2003 – 2007 – Director for Documentary Film, The National Film School of Denmark.
1999 – 2000 – Fatamorgana, Danish School of Art Photography.
1998 – 1999 – School of Image Arts, Ryerson University, Toronto.
1998 – Centro de Formacao Fotografica, Maputo.
1997 – 2001 – BA in Communication Studies, Roskilde University, Denmark.

EXHIBITIONS
2013 – ‘Maputo Diary’, Fotografisk Center, Copenhagen.
2012 – ‘Maputo Diary’, Galleri Image, Aarhus, Denmark.
2011 – ‘Maputo Diary’, ARS11, Kiasma Museum of Contemporary Art, Helsinki.
2010 – ‘Maputo Diary’, FotoFestiwal, Lodz, Poland.
2007 – ‘International Womens Art Festival’, Aleppo, Syria.
2006 – ‘Sisters – Video Me’, NGBK, Berlin.
2006 – ‘African Diary’, The Odense Photo Triennial, Denmark.
2003 – ‘Making Eyes’, Fotografisk Center, Copenhagen.
2003 – ‘Manas’, A.M.F. Gallery, Maputo.
2003 – ‘Sisters’, Witwatersrand University, Johannesburg.
2002 – ‘Play Works’, Fotografisk Center, Copenhagen.

 

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laia abril – on eating disorders the epilogue

Emerging Photographer Fund – 2014 Finalist

 

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Laia Abril

On Eating Disorders: The Epilogue

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At the end of 2010, after leading a year in recovery to overcome ten years of bulimia, I decided to document the struggle of girls battling the same disease. For the next three years, I worked first on Chapter One: ‘A Bad Day’, describing the hidden ghost of the illness through the daily life of Jo who suffered from severe bulimia and practiced self-injury. Then, I created Chapter Two: ‘Thinspiration’, a documentation of the Pro-Ana, an online community who promote the eating disorder anorexia nervosa as a ‘life style choice’.

At this point I realized my aim had focused on explaining all these uncomfortable aspects around eating disorders, in attempt to demystify the taboos. This reflection led me to face the most feared ghost; and chapter three was born: ‘The Epilogue; the story of the Robinson family’ and the aftermath of losing their 26 year-old daughter to bulimia.

This last chapter ended up giving voice to the suffering of the indirect victims, the unwilling eyewitnesses of a very painful degeneration. I explored the problems families face in dealing with both their sense of guilt and the grieving process; the frustration of close friends and the dark ghosts of this deadliest of illnesses; all blended together in the bittersweet act of remembering a loved one. In my stay in Chattanooga, I inquired in the past to reconstruct Cammy’s life from day one. Picking up the valuable testimony of her family and friends; as if it were a puzzle tried to fit each piece. With unlimited access I rummaged in her diaries, letters, objects, memories to find all those tracks that would make me understand her struggles.

Now is time to draw the whole work to a conclusion. First I plan in give a closing to The Epilogue by creating a multimedia piece with all the audio visual material I made and I’m planning to. The final step is to collaborate in programs, which research the benefit impact of these stories and how can become a useful tool for fight this world epidemic.

 

 

Bio

Laia Abril is a documentary photographer, journalist and ‘maker of books’ raised in Barcelona. Her work has been published widely in, amongst others, The Sunday Times Magazine, International New York Times, D Repubblica, Le Monde, FT, Burn, PDN, CNN, GUP, Esquire etc. She is a member of the editorial team at COLORS Magazine since she enrolled FABRICA  ‘the Artist Residency in Italy’ in 2009. Her projects have been exhibited in Italy, Spain, Poland, London and New York. In 2010 she joined the agency Reportage by Getty, as an emerging talent, and was selected at Plat(t)form Winterthur PhotoMuseum 2012. More recently was a finalist at the Burn Emerging Fund (2012), shortlisted for Fotovisura Grant (2013), Jury’s choice Award at the CENTER (2013) and nominated to the Magnum Foundation and the Joop Swart Masterclass. In 2012 she self-published the fanzine ‘Thinspiration’ and most recently she released ‘Tediousphilia’ (Musée de l’Elysée, 2014) and ‘The Epilogue’ (Dewi Lewis, 2014).

 

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Jeju Island, S Korea

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valerio polici – ergo sum

Emerging Photographer Fund 2014 – Finalist

 

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Valerio Polici

Ergo Sum

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“My reality is bigger than your dreams are” (Porer 031 crew. Milan 2011)

Probably everything starts from the need of escaping for a while from boredom, pain, personal limitation.

I’ve known for the first time the writer’s world around my twelve year old, immediately fascinated for all of the mystery and the indefiniteness that enveloped it. His protagonists were my idols: superheroes with covered faces of a clandestine world. Of them you only knew names and legends.

I’ve joined this community that slowly absorbed every energy, every emotion, prioritizing above everything else.
Transforming my life in a kind of very adventurous viedo-game, graffiti answered to that desire of feeling special that everybody has: dark burrows, stalks, deactivate sensors and cameras, military organization, breathe mixed up with the ones running at your side. A nocturnal odyssey that arises in the intestinal spaces of the metropolis, where fear become consolatory.
Their deeds take shape in the daytime through unintelligible signs that rewrite the urban aesthetics, under the distracted gazes of the passer-by. Cities appear as diaries of several small stories of invisibilities, a redemption from anonymity to obtain the own “fifteen minutes of fame”.

In the last three years I’ve followed different groups of writers between Europe and Argentina, trying to give to the viewers the taste of those sensations that trap lots of kids in this limbo.

Among intrusions, climbing, infinite running, darkness and a lot of adrenaline, this is the tale of our escape.

 

Bio

Valerio Polici was born in Rome in 1984.
From 2006 to 2009 he studied advertising at Lumsa university in Rome, making one year exchange studies in Lisbon at I.S.C.E.M. University, and working in an advertising agency for three months.
In 2011 he studied photography at I.S.F.C.I. school in Rome. Than he followed a masterclass in Padua with Enrico Bossan (head of photography department at Fabrica), and a workshop with Paolo Pellegrin.
From 2012 to 2013 he was assistant photographer for Giovanni Cocco.
His first publication was in 2012 for the Italian newspaper “L’Unità” about housing emergency. His first reportage assignment was in 2014 for the Italian magazine “L’Espresso” about an experimental art gallery in a squatting in Rome.
From 2011 to 2014, he’s been working on a project about the human need of escape, through the community of graffiti writers, featured on: B.J.P. , Newsweek online, Fk, Private, among others.
He’s currently working on a new project about Portuguese culture.

 

 

 

 

 

Miju

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marco casino – staff riding

Emerging Photographer Fund 2014 – Finalist

 

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Marco Casino

Staff Riding

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Katlehong is one of the largest townships in South Africa and has played a key role in the history of the struggle against apartheid. This urban area has been for many years a dormitory-town for workers employed in the Johannesburg’s factories. Poverty is widespread, and there are still vast areas where houses are shacks. The unemployment rate is above 50%. Staff riding, the local slang for train surfing, is a widespread phenomenon in SA. The almost total majority of surfers are kids under 25. Amputations and death are really common. Train is historically the conveyance which accompanied workers from the township to Joburg. The Prasa Metrorail, the local train company, is one of the foundations of SA society. This connection between train and citizens remained very strong over time. Associated with economic stagnation, degradation and the logic of life on the road, led to the birth of train surfing as a social phenomenon. The spectacular and risky act of train surfing becomes the framework to tell the Katlehong’s young people social fabric. This place has been the epicenter of the antiapartheid’s guerrillas, and on the eve of the twentieth anniversary of the facts that we all know, the situation of segregation has remained more or less unchanged in daily life. In a context where violence, rampant poverty, abuse of alchool/drugs and infant birth/AIDS are the masters, the train surfing is configured as the search for a social redemption that will never come for the characters of this story. This work is part of a long-term project about the post-apartheid SA’s new generation and is designed to be a web platform halfway between the web-doc and a social network. Through the use of interactive maps, navigation will be driven between the Joburg metro stations, where each one of them will become the narrative device to tell a different aspect of the social life of the photographed subjects. The site will be online for the half of 2015 also thanks to the support of Lucie Foundation and Leica Camera.

 

Bio

Marco Casino is a multimedia photographer specialized in social reportage. In March 2012, with “The Death Of Italian Horseracing”, won the Leica Talent 24×36 contest, thanks to which start to collaborates with Vanity Fair Italy.
In April ’12 was honored by Y’art Project Association as winner of the full scholarship, sponsored by Hasselblad, for the Photo Workshop in St. Petersburg. Also in 2012, was nominated as first ambassador for Leica Camera in Italy. In the same year he founded the commercial agency Made In Milan. In 2014 was nominated as candidate for the annual Joop Swart Masterclass from World Press Photo. In recent years he is carrying out his vision of multimedia photography, trying to involve the biggest audience possible, developing new way to tell compelling story through the internet.
Since 2014 Marco is a member of LUZphoto Agency. He is 28 and currently based between Milan and Turin, Italy.

 

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Family Reunion!

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Family Reunion! The most heartwarming moment of my entire career came last Saturday evening when my son Erin (shoots tv docs) and I met the Liggins family from my “Tell It Like It Is” book project from 1967. 6 of the 9 family members still living and in a family owned house just 4 blocks from the original tenement building where I had photographed them 47 years ago in Norfolk, Va. Erin filmed the reunion. I had lost contact with the family when I went off to grad school. A new version of “Tell It Like It Is” will be published in 2015 along with the 37 contact sheets that comprised the whole take. Piece of history. This photo taken of all of us on Saturday by Derica White,11, grand-daughter of Lois Liggins (center) who was 7 yrs old when I shot the essay and was the cover subject of the original book. Lois now aids troubled teens. Another era. Another America. This whole story has many chapters. Then and now. Stay tuned.