Drew Nikonowicz – This World and Others Like It

summer_2014 047

Drew Nikonowicz

This World and Others Like It

[ FUJIFILM/YOUNG TALENT AWARD 2016 RUNNER UP ]

This World and Others Like It investigates the role of the 21st century explorer by combining computer modeling with analogue photographic processes. Drawing upon the language of 19th Century survey images, I question their relationship with current methods of record making. Thousands of explorable realities exist through rover and probe based imagery, virtual role-playing, and video game software. Within the contemporary wilderness, robots have replaced photographers as mediators producing images completely dislocated from human experience. This suggests that now the sublime landscape is only accessible through the boundaries of technology.

 

 

Short Bio

Drew Nikonowicz (born in St. Louis Missouri, 1993) presently lives and works in Treviso, Italy. He received a BFA from the University of Missouri-Columbia in 2016. His work employs computer simulations as well as analog photographic processes to deal with landscape and exploration in contemporary photography. He recently won the 2015 Lenscratch Student Prize, the 2015 Aperture Portfolio Prize, and exhibited his work at the Museum of Contemporary Art of Rome. He is currently a resident artist at Fabrica.

 

Related Links

Drew Nikonowicz

 

FujiFilm_Basic-Black

6 Responses to “Drew Nikonowicz – This World and Others Like It”


  • Nice pictures, but what does your artist’s statement mean in English?

  • Translation: it does not mean “nice” pictures

  • I’ve gone through it four times, now. It gets more intriguing with each viewing. Each viewing takes a little longer than the previous. Drew has take the commonplace and made it seem ne, original and a bit puzzling.

  • Akaky, I think what he’s trying to say is that the illusion of the natural opens a space for the authentication of the image, and that the culture of normative value(s) replays (in parodic form) the legitimation of the photograph, with the result that the epistemology of consumption opens a space for discourse about the socio-technological authenticity of the image in the public sphere.

  • “Akaky, I think what he’s trying to say is that the illusion of the natural opens a space for the authentication of the image, and that the culture of normative value(s) replays (in parodic form) the legitimation of the photograph, with the result that the epistemology of consumption opens a space for discourse about the socio-technological authenticity of the image in the public sphere.” Then why didn’t he just say so instead of all that sesquipedalian beating around the bush?

  • @ ALL: Burn is getting more and more contemporany photography… EPF this year is contemporany phtoography, this essay is contemporany photography…

    Looking forward to see some good reportages :)

    Shine. P
    PS: Arles was great this year, contemporany, of course, but documentary as well. Nice work by Pablo Piovano, from Argentina!

Comments are currently closed.