Archive for the 'dialogue' Category

Emerging Photographer Fund 2015

Emerging Photographer Fund 2015

Youth Denied: Young Migrants in Greece

Photo © Alessandro Penso, EPF 2014 Winner

 

Now is the time for some of you to start thinking about our Emerging Photographer Fund for 2015…

We will have at least $10,000. grant funding for an emerging photographer to finish a current project or begin a new one based on previous work.

Those of us on the Burn team are very proud to be able to support this grant for a photographer who might indeed be relatively unknown today, but will be an icon tomorrow.
An esteemed EPF Jury will be selected to choose the grant recipient.
We will announce the recipient at the LOOK 3 Festival of the Photograph in June of 2015….
The deadline for submission is May 1, 2015.
Please see our submissions page
I started this grant on my old Road Trips blog back in 2007 with my own money. Since then generous anonymous donors to Burn through the Magnum Foundation have kept the EPF alive and flourishing.
Please take a close look at your own work. Think body of work and/or narrative. Your work may be of either journalistic or artistic imperative. We are simply looking for serious work of any type where funding would help in the completion of this work. Authorship is the key.

 

Call for submissions

 

The Emerging Photographer Fund 2015 is now open for submissions!

The deadline for entry is May 1st, 2015 (6pm PST)

The winner will receive $10,000
and other awards will be announced soon.

Enter here!

 

More information here: http://www.burnmagazine.org/emerging-photographer-grant/

A Conversation With Martin Parr

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A Conversation With Martin Parr

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David Alan Harvey: What I do on Burn is I will run a set of pictures and then have what I call a conversation, I don’t even call it an interview. You like beaches. I like beaches. You and I see different things at the beach but I am interested in this new take on Benidorm. Had you been to Benidorm before?

Martin Parr: Oh yeah, I did a little book on Benidorm before.

DAH: I didn’t see the book on Benidorm, how did I miss that?

MP: I don’t know, I did it about 15 years ago.

DAH: Somehow I missed that one. I have a pretty good collection of Martin Parr books but obviously I don’t have them all.

MP: It is more of a catalogue type, I’m sorry. I think of all this stuff as beach therapy, you see.

DAH: Explain beach therapy to me.

MP: When I try a new technique, I always do it first on the beach. There are about six phases of my photography career, black and white, then wide angle with medium format, etc., etc., but I always try them out on the beach first because it’s like an experimental laboratory for me. You have all these people, you can do different things, so this is no exception. It is really like the last chapter of exploration. So inevitably, therefor, I begin at the beach first.

DAH: Why do you think that is? How did that come to be your laboratory?

MP: Well I love beaches anyway, so it is always a good excuse to go to the beach and take more photographs and when you are trying out a new idea I always make it the place where I start.

DAH: What led to the long lens? Before you were always up in people’s faces, popping a flash with fairly close range with a wide angle or normal lens. Is it something that changed inside you that said “okay I want to pull back a little bit”, or you just like the look?

MP: In more recent times I have been using the digital on the beach, I have been pulling back anyway, but now I wanted to pull forward. This is all brought about because I had these big propaganda photography books that were from all over the place, but in particular they have very interesting, creative use of the telephoto lens and it just struck me that in the art photography business, which we are part of, the art photography / documentary business, this is a lens that is basically rejected and not used at all with the exception of Beat Streuli. It is very very occasional when you see it, but basically we all use wide angle as a standard.

DAH: Well I think you told me a couple of years ago in Arles, “David why don’t you go a little bit longer”, and you know I started out in photography with a 50mm lens, so I did, I went back since I had been shooting so much with the 35mm. So now I am in the 50-75mm range. I am not as long as you are – you are out there with the 200-300mm length it looks like.

MP: I think it is interesting to experiment and basically I am using this propaganda material as my starting point because they show me what is possible with the telephoto lens, because the art world hasn’t. As you know we turn a blind eye to it. We just blank it out. So it is very interesting to see if it can be made into something interesting. And you know I have had a few experiments now – I think those were the most successful.What I have done in Italy I haven’t edited very thoroughly yet, but you suddenly start to see a pattern emerge and it looks interesting.

DAH: Well that is great. So you will do another book on Benidorm?

MP: I will do a book eventually that will be called “beach therapy” where I’ll explain this process of experimentation and then illustrate it with the set of pictures done with the telephoto. If I do a book called “Life at the Beach” I have to set the whole thing back a bit.

DAH: Yeah, that’s right.

MP: There are different version of that. I did a deluxe version and and beach bag version. There is only so much power the world can take and there are only so many beach photographs that the world can take, but none-the-less you feel that you are onto something. That’s why I was quite happy to isolate the Benidorm pictures from one particular shoot that seemed to really work.

DAH: Well you have Argentina also.

MP: That was the start of the experiment and that showed me what was possible, and then I tried to build on it and since then I have done stuff in England and in Italy.

DAH: Also at the beach?

MP: Yes. It is more difficult though. I am shooting in Rome now and didn’t even bring the telephoto lens with me. What I am generally doing is having the foreground out of focus and focusing way beyond. That is the thing that to me looks more interesting. Now when I did my previous Benidorm book I was using the macro lens which is an insane lens to use on the beach. Macro with a ring flash. And there I was focusing on the foreground and letting everything else fall away. So now I am doing the entire opposite.

DAH: Is the woman with the glasses an original Benidorm picture?

MP: That was one of those things that inspired me, in fact. The out of focus there is very effective. It is an icon that you will remember and I am trying to replicate that feel and look, but that was done on the macro lens. So that was a 50mm lens compared to the 70-200mm lens which I am using now.

DAH: Right. Now this puts you into a completely different relationship with your subjects. Before, obviously at some point, you were so close to the people you had to engage with them probably some of the time. Now you are completely disengaged from the subject.

MP: In fact it works in my value because as you know it is getting more and more difficult to photograph on the beaches in particular when there are kids around because people go nutsy when you start photographing kids. I have been not quite arrested on the beach in Rio, but I have been apprehended to the police being called. Therefor, [the lens] does get rid of that problem. I had my phase of getting really close, and I still do get really close. For example this current session I am photographing in the Vatican Museum for the Museum here, and I am right on top of people so it is not like I am not doing that anymore. But the beach has become a particularly controversial place to photograph.

DAH: I think that is right. I always look around for mom and dad first if I see a kid because that can be an issue.

MP: Years ago when I was doing the last resort, which is the first big body of work I did, I shot on the beach, again as part of the beach therapy process, people didn’t even think about that. Now it is always in people’s minds.

DAH: At my beach here for some reason nobody minds. There are kids running all over the place. But in most beaches it has gotten like that. Well that’s great, thank you Martin.

MP: Thanks David.

 

Related Links

Martin Parr

BurnDiary

jeremy

Hot air balloons lift above the crowd in this time honored tradition. Drawing thousands of enthusiasts to Albuquerque annually since 1972. Photo © Jeremy Wade Shockley for BurnDiary

We have lost our original account for our BurnDiary Instagram account. The email associated with our account was accidentally changed by one of our users. Changed to something nobody knows.

So we are starting over. Appropriately I think we have re-started with Anton Kusters who helped Burn get rolling in the first place.
Unfortunately we lost all of our “followers”. However, I think in a few weeks we should be back where we were when we lost the account.
We sort of care about the followers being lost, yet on the other hand our primary goal for our BurnDiary is to over the next few months create enough content to produce our next Burn03 just from the work of the photographers on Burn Diary.
Anyone following BurnDiary will be seeing a book made in real time and being built by this audience. We will use some iconic photographers, yet most of the work for BurnDiary will be from lesser known emerging photographers. My usual formula for publishing work here on Burn.
While Instagram does not replace anything else in the world of photography, it has certainly changed the landscape of our craft more than anything I have seen in my career.
Photography is now a common language. Actually the world’s ONLY common language. Think about it.
Some lament this development. Some applaud it. I love it. Just fun for one thing.
Does not take away from anything else you may want to be doing with your work.
Let us know if you aspire to be the week long essayist for BurnDiary. We are choosing carefully, yet absolutely everyone has a shot at it.
Even if you go back right now and simply look at our archive of about two months of BurnDiary, you may be able to see how we might think we could get a book after several months of dedicated shooting. We will see.
-dah-

Message in a Bottle

NGS Picture ID:622552

 

Two of my photos left our solar system today and are now in interstellar space aboard Voyager. Two shots out of the 100 chosen to represent life on Earth. The only “message in a bottle” from our planet. I shot this picture of a father and his daughter in Malaysia while on assignment for NatGeo in 1976 and with my whole family in tow. The shot has been flying high for 35 years. Destination unknown!

ahhhh, Kodachrome!!!

 

NGS Picture ID:621257

Back Bay Wildlife Refuge, Va. Beach Va….my mother sort of “made me” go see what was up at this wildlife refuge…Not my thing really, but when your mother makes a suggestion and leans a bit , well you just do it!!  Walked right in to this. This was also a double spread in NatGeo for an article on Virginia where I lived at the time. Thanks Mom. That picture went a whole lot further than we thought….

Wet Hair

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Last days of summer in the Outer Banks, NC.

A surfer flips her hair after doing some long board surfing. The Outer Banks is one of the best surf spots on the East Coast and the locals hope for hurricane waves this time of year. Let’s just hope the hurricanes stay offshore…

Summer of 13

tonicoalex

I feel this morning just a wee twinge of fall in the air here in the Outer Banks of NC. Oh yes it is still summer, but I can feel and smell what’s coming. I won’t think winter yet of course but the change of seasons always makes one think things over a bit. Reflect.

The summer of 2013 was all reflection in my case. I took most of the summer “off”, stayed home, rode my bike, made prints in the darkroom, and had a summer I have not had since I can remember. Yup the summer of childhood. One of those summers we all tend to leave behind once “responsibility” strikes and we must all go to work leaving behind childhood fantasies and dreams.

Pretty funny I guess, yet I never bought totally into giving up the fantasy. For sure I did learn to accept at least some responsibility in life, yet I never could get those summer dreams out of my head. I have been hanging on to my summer dreams summer passion summer romance the whole damn time! I shouda coulda woulda followed all the rules I guess, but on the other hand the “authorities” have not yet come knocking on my door and arrested me for arrested development, ha ha.

Did I get away with the crime of never moving totally into adulthood? I think maybe I did. I am rolling down the highway of life and I don’t think they can catch me now, and I ain’t looking back.

Does this mean no reality at all? Of course not. I have had to deal with all the same realities as everyone else. Yet just keeping a piece of my bicycle dreams alive all along has allowed me to escape the doldrums of aging that I see so many people living. And I do not mean “old” people. I see “young” folks who lose the dream at 30. Or even before. Logically I suppose it is an age thing, yet I am not so sure.

What I see is that the dream can live or die at any age.

Photography for sure has saved me. With pictures I could always go somewhere all by myself and where nobody else could go or had ever been. A singular adventure. I discovered this at an early age, and well here I am with the same damned dream the same wonderment the same excitement of freezing a moment in time. So either I have gone nowhere all along or I am living in my imagination or maybe both. On the other hand, who cares or why the hell not?

Yesterday for example, I could not stop seeing pictures everywhere all the time. They seemed to be falling out of the sky and all I had to do was reach out and grab them. Nothing at all difficult to do. Gifts. So easy it was a little disconcerting actually. Now not everyday is like that, yet I do seem to have a lot of days like that. No idea why really. Oh no, I do not mean that everyone else is going to think I had a great day of shooting, but I don’t care about everybody else. It worked for me. And for sure that is the state of mind I try to get those I mentor to see and feel and believe and live.

After the success of (based on a true story) I had about 5 minutes of “job well done” pleasure, and then quickly moved into the space where one must be to move forward. We all need to move ahead in exactly the same way after success as we do with failure. “Failure” means you must get your act together and do something. “Success” means exactly the same damned thing. Actually it is even harder after success.

Now I am sketching all over the place. No rush. I am shooting some medium format b&w film, going crazy hourly with my iPhone, and playing with several different digi “serious real cameras”.. All work. While at some points in my occasional forays into “adult behavior” I did tend to lean linear, I am now thinking that a smorgasbord has every right to have a place at the table as a meat and potatoes dinner. Why would I let a camera or a technique or anything at all get in the way of just raw and fierce and passionate? Even if I am “wrong” it is all part of sketching. A process. And no way around it. This stuff cannot be “decided”.

I went off the straight documentary rails with (based on a true story). I hope nobody thought I could ever come back. How could I?

So now I am just a “boy on a bike”. Not a bad place to be.

As I sometimes do here on Burn, I ask a question of this audience.

My question this morning to you as I have my third coffee is: How do YOU set yourself free? You must have an answer.

-dah-

 

(photograph above shot on Pea Island in the Outer Banks NC of “Tonico” Monteiro and Alexandra Lettrich)

 

Tonico and Alex

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Changing clothes in the parking lot of a pier is just one of those things you end up doing sometimes down here Outer Banks way. Here my Brazilian bro Tonico changes his shoes and my friend Alex gets ready for a swim. Tonico a key character in my book set in Rio ( based on a true story) and i am shooting Alex for real.. so both my “models”…both super good people.

JR

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Photo by Candy Pilar Godoy

 

Artist JR in his studio in NYC. I interviewed and photographed JR for BURN yesterday. A hard man to catch is JR. Always on the move and always for a good cause. I have photographed my share of well known artists yet IMO this man is the real thing. Stay tuned.

 

Giulia

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Retro. Medium format film. Giulia Piolanti, ballerina Cirque du Soleil. Photographed in San Quirico d’Orcia, Tuscany, Italy. This fibre print fresh out of my darkroom. One of a kind.

I am now ONLY interested in medium format film. Totally set to process film and print at home. A luxury beyond all. At the same time I am shooting also with my iPhone and mixing retro with 5 minutes ago. I mean why not?

Who says things must be “boxed” and in “order”? Life does come in sequence, yet memory and perception are abstract.

This is what photography IS.

If you only wanted “reality”, then no need to pick up pen, or brush, or camera.

 

475 Kent

475kent
The “Kibbutz”…from a book upcoming.