Monthly Archive for November, 2017

Mariya Kozhanova – Declared Detachment

 

 

Mariya Kozhanova

Declared Detachment

[ EPF 2017 – HONORABLE MENTION ]

 

The series “Declared Detachment” represents a generation of Russians which was born in times when well organized society and established identity fell apart. All myths and beliefs that were the driving force for generations before were destroyed. Children came into our time absolutely ideologically naked.

 

 

Now a lack of base and missing of foundation in society opened them a life which they could not trust. Forces for creating their own identity from the beginning were missing. In this moment, their society could not offer them any deserved faith, ideals or any other meaning. This young generation of Russians started to borrow it from totally different cultures.

 

Some of them declared their way through Japanese mass-culture of “cosplay” where in a simple, catchy, bright, spectacular, superficial world of anime heroes with attractive idols and colorful looks you could become any of those figures yourself. This generation escaped into a different ideology and tried to build their illusive world on the ruins of the past. But are their beliefs true enough for a new establishment or just a temporary detachment from troubles and imperfections of everyday life?

 

Short Bio

Mariya Kozhanova was born in 1986 in Kaliningrad, Russia. She is a member of the Kaliningrad Union of Photographers.

From 2007 to 2017, she exhibited with her photo projects in Russia, Lithuania, Germany, United States, Slovakia, South Korea, United Kingdom, Italy, Brazil, Japan, Denmark, and Finland. Mariya participated in the Houston FotoFest (2012) with a group exhibition of the Young Generation of Russian Photography. In the year 2013 and 2015, she was chosen for the Young Portfolio of the Kiyosato Museum of Photographic Arts. She was a World Press Joop Swart Masterclass 2016 student and 2017 she was awarded third place with her first book dummy “Two Sisters” during the Vienna Photobook Festival.

“Declared Detachment” was exhibited at the Singapore International Photography Festival (2014), at Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Photography (2014), during Kaunas Photo (2015), at a solo show during the Festival de la Luz (2016) and recently during Backlight Festival (2017).

 

Related Links

 

 

mariyakozhanova.com

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The Emerging Photographer Fund is supported by generous donors to the Magnum Foundation

Magnum Foundation

Elena Anosova – Out of the Way

Elena Anosova

Out of the Way

[ EPF 2017 – FINALIST ]

The project was created on the far away territories of the Extreme North of Russia, where bad accessibility and isolation, special relationship with nature, and following the century-long ways of life involve unique mythology of the region where the fictional things are very often more important than modern reality. These lands are immersed into the flow of their own life activity, where the past and the present surprisingly interlace. My ancestors were hereditary hunters in a small settlement near Nizhnyaya Tunguska River. Almost 300 years ago they came to colonize Siberia, then assimilated into the Evenkis and founded a village in taiga. They lived in an old house as a large family with more than 15 children. 

 

 

Nowadays the population of the village is 100 adults, and all of them are distant relatives: those who are not brothers, are related in a neighbourly way. Life of this part of my family, my father’s siblings and numerous cousins and nephews, has not changed for centuries in that remote area surrounded with pristine wilderness. Modern civilization penetrates slowly and fragmentarily in there, it is intricately woven into the local way of life. The closest town is 300 km away, and the transport connection functions only in winter time. Local and family legends and traditions are still mighty in the settlement.

 

 

Short Bio

Originally hailing from the picturesque region of Baikal, artist Elena Anosova (born in 1983) is currently based in Moscow and Irkutsk. Anosovass work is centered around lives in closed institutions, isolation, social stigmatization. The impulse of research of such communities arose in a reflection of her teenage period spent at the closed rehabilitation boarding school. She would like to takes a closer look at the dynamic interplay of processes of isolation and surveillance, at unique qualities of emotional and social relationships within restrictions of artificially insulated societies. Also Elena Anosova works with subjects of borders, identity and collective memory in the territory of Siberia, Extreme North and Russian Far East.

 

Related Links

 

anosova.com

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The Emerging Photographer Fund is supported by generous donors to the Magnum Foundation

Magnum Foundation

Matt Eich – I Love You, I’m Leaving

Matt Eich

I Love You, I’m Leaving

[ EPF 2017 – FINALIST ]

My introduction to photography was in childhood, as my grandmother was dying of Alzheimer’s disease. The hopelessness of her plight triggered something within me, and when my grandfather handed me a camera, making photographs became a way of stabilizing the insecurity of memory and accessing emotional resonance. If we are at risk of forgetting too much of our world, and ourselves, photography is the antidote.

I created this work during a time of general domestic unease, when my parents separated after 33 years of marriage, my siblings all experienced drastic changes in their lives and my wife, children and I moved to a new city.

The title of this series, I Love You, I’m Leaving, stems from the constant rhythm of my peripatetic life. It holds true when I leave my family to photograph strangers, and leave strangers to return home.

 

 

 

This series borrows from personal experience, and the visual language of the everyday in order to create a fictional account that mirrors my reality. Photographs are reductions, distillations, half-truths and complete fabrications. They can only describe the surface of things, while I am interested in the intangible – memory and emotional resonance.

 

 

Despite our intimacy, the people I am closest to are unknowable, and will always remain a mystery to me. I photograph with the knowledge that our place in this world is tenuous, comprised of little more than memory and story. Memory is fragile; the moments are fleeting and have to be wrestled into a permanent state.

 

 

Short Bio

Matt Eich (b. 1986) is a portrait photographer, and photographic essayist working on long-form projects about the American condition. He is a Professional Lecturer of Photography at George Washington University and lives in Charlottesville, Virginia with his wife and two daughters.

Matt’s work has been widely exhibited and received numerous grants and recognitions, including PDN’s 30 Emerging Photographers to Watch, the Joop Swart Masterclass, an Aaron Siskind Fellowship, and two Getty Images Grants for Editorial Photography. Matt’s prints are held in the permanent collections of The Portland Art Museum, the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, The New York Public Library, Chrysler Museum of Art and others.

Eich studied photojournalism at Ohio University and holds an MFA in Photography from Hartford Art School’s International Limited-Residency Program. He has published two monographs, with three book publications scheduled between 2018 and 2020.

 

Related Links

 

matteichphoto.com

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The Emerging Photographer Fund is supported by generous donors to the Magnum Foundation

Magnum Foundation

Marta Giaccone – Systems of Harmony

Marta Giaccone

Systems of Harmony

[ EPF 2017 – FINALIST ]

Systems of Harmony is a personal portrait of 2016 suburban America. In the 19th century a large number of Europeans and Americans went to great lengths to establish small utopian communities throughout America. They were preachers, social reformers, industrialists, philosophers, anarchists, journalists and socialist thinkers who attracted large crowds to their intentional colonies. Nevertheless they were exclusive establishments, some religious in character, that saw in the vastness of the American wilderness a favorable economic, political and social environment. They didn’t last long: some a few months, others a few years.

I traveled to many of these former utopias drawn by their often evocative and tenderly pretentious names such as Utopia, New Harmony or Modern Times, out of curiosity for what those places look like now and wondering where America is, 150 years later.

 

 

There was German Pietist preacher George Rapp who created the Harmony Society (1805-1906) and, together with his Harmonites, aspired to be worthy of Christ and prepare for his return by purifying himself through celibacy, which turned out to be the main cause of their failure, as it prevented new members from within.

 

 

In Welsh industrialist Robert Owenss model working community (1826-1828), work and the enjoyment of its results should be experienced communally. In his idea of reorganization of society there was no private property, which, together with no individual sovereignty, again led to failure.

And then there was John Humphrey Noyes’ sect of Perfectionists (1848-1880), who created the practice of “stirpiculture” by which the male members should obey to continence and only the most spiritually advanced ones, first of all Noyes himself, were encouraged to procreate in order to produce superior offspring.

I used these and many more background stories as the basis to create my own trip around America.

 

 

Short Bio

 

Marta Giaccone (1988, Milan, Italy) received an MA in Documentary Photography at the University of South Wales, UK, in 2014 and a BA in English and Hispanic American Literatures at the University of Milan, Italy, in 2011. Her work focuses on issues related to family and youth with a particular interest in the feminine perspective. She is also drawn to the juxtapositions of cultures and ideologies found within contemporary American society. Her practice evolves through long-term documentary projects shot on medium and large format film for a more intimate approach. She has worked for Richard Mosse as a production assistant for “Incoming”; for Magnum Photos NYC, Bruce Davidson, Alessandra Sanguinetti and Mary Ellen Mark as an intern; for Mark Power and Olivia Arthur as a translator. She has been among the finalists of many prizes and taken part in group shows in England, Wales, Italy and the US. Her first solo show “Ritorno all’Isola di Arturo” opens in Procida, Italy, in Sept 2017.

 

Related Links

 

martagiaconne.com

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The Emerging Photographer Fund is supported by generous donors to the Magnum Foundation

Magnum Foundation

Wiktoria Wojciechowska – Sparks

Andriy, 27, astronomy graduate, picture was taken after he spent 9 months in the war zone, March 2015, Ukraine.

Wiktoria Wojciechowska

Sparks

[ EPF 2017 – HONORABLE MENTION ]

Sparks is a multi-dimensional portrait of a contemporary war in Europe, forgotten but still actual, the war in Ukraine. Ukrainians are fighting against the separatists, who are Ukrainians as well, driven by Russia’s influence and support. The core of the project is meeting victims of the war and dealing with aspects of the conflict like its influence, the impact on the environment and the lives of ordinary people, from late 2014 until 2016.

 

 

The title Sparks refers to the burning pieces of missiles that mercilessly pierce the walls of people’s homes. The light of explosions reflects in faces and memories of the victims. History is told in unconventional way using documentary photography, portraits, collages, videos and collected materials from the soldiers.

 

Portraits of young, non-professional soldiers form the backbone of the project. They went to fight in their sneakers, with weapons stolen from a museum, with all the fears and problems that any of us may encounter. They left their previous identities and occupations: philosopher, mechanic, astronomer, music DJ, bank assistant or high school students – none of them were prepared for what they were to experience. Whoever survives, is no longer the same person.

Sparks is still an ongoing project with the aim to depict next the changes which are happening in the country, consumed by war.

 

 

 

Short Bio

Photographer and Multimedia artist, Born in Lublin, Poland. Graduated from Academy of Fine Arts in Warsaw, Poland. In 2015 she became the Winner of Oskar Barnack Leica Newcomer Award and received awards for her project “Short Flashes” – portraits of drenched cyclists captured on the streets of metropolises in China. Nominated for: Joop Swart Masterclass 2016, Unseen Young Talents, Lucie Foundation Emerging Artists, Visura Grant, Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation Prize and Foam Paul Huf Award. She took part artist residencies in Iceland, China and France. Her works were presented during the solo exhibitions and international art and photo festivals, published in magazines: British Journal of Photography, L’Oeil de la photographie, Vice, Leica Fotografie International, FT Weekend Magazine, Guardian.

Her first book “Short Flashes” published by Bemojake came out in May 2016.

 

Related Links

wiktoriawojciechowska.com

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The Emerging Photographer Fund is supported by generous donors to the Magnum Foundation

Magnum Foundation

Sarah Pabst – Zukunft

My grandmother 1938, 18 years old.

Sarah Pabst

Zukunft

[ EPF 2017 – HONORABLE MENTION ]

I was still standing on a northern corner.
Moonlit winter clouds the color of the desperation of wolves.
Proof of Your existence? There is nothing but.
(Franz Wright)

Between 1933-1945 Germany and many parts of Europe were dominated by Nazism and World War II. 72 years later, the traumatic experiences of this period are still present in Europe. Memories are associated with pain, violence and threat. In Germany in particular, this legacy took the form of guilt in post-war generations, ashamed by the events and their place in history. This work is traversed by that history. My grandparents survived the war and just as many of their generation they have passed away and now their memories will soon be part of the past.

I always ask myself, what if. What if I had been born at the same time as my grandmother, what if the Waffen-SS had hanged my grandfather for running away with young Rumanian prisoners of war, what if the US-troops had arrived some hours later? Future is unpredictable, things can turn either way. What if my sister had been married to a jew not now but 80 years ago? And questions one can’t answer – Why are people capable of deporting children, men, women, entire families to their sure death?

 

 

My project is a series of questions, of a past that lives in us, of wounds we inherit from our forefathers. I heard their stories of life, suffering, hunger, guilt and death, and not only obedience but also resistance against the Nazi regime. Finally, these memories, their memories, became part of mine. Through them, I build and shape my own ones, the past, the present and thereby, also the future.

 

In September 2016 my brother died of sudden cardiac death. Suddenly, future came down on us. This project is dedicated to him.

 

Short Bio

Sarah is a German-born (1984) documentary photographer and painter based in Buenos Aires, Argentina since 2013. Besides her personal intimate work she mainly focuses on women and identity topics. Her work has been exhibited both nationally and internationally.

Her work has received international recognition being a finalist in Arles’ Voies Off, Athens Photo Festival, Organ Vida Festival, Nano Festival and the Gomma Grant, all 2017. She was nominated for the JS Masterclass twice. She was a winner of the Portfolio Revisions at FoLa and selected twice for Descubrimientos Photo España. In 2015 she won a 3rd Prize at the POY LATAM and the Canon Profifoto Grant 2014. Her work was published in California Sunday Magazine, GUP, Bloomberg, Vice, Lensculture, Le Monde Dipl., and Juxtpoz, among others.

She owns a masters degree in Fine Arts and Spanish (University of Cologne and Wuppertal, 2011) where she also worked as an adjunct lecturer from 2012-15.

 

Related Links

 

sarahpabst.com

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The Emerging Photographer Fund is supported by generous donors to the Magnum Foundation

Magnum Foundation