Monthly Archive for December, 2010

danny ghitis – land of os

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Danny Ghitis

Land of Os

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Every year more than a million tourists visit the concentration camps of Auschwitz – Birkenau to pay respect to the same number of innocent men, women and children who were murdered there. Because they come and go on the same day, most travelers are oblivious that Auschwitz is located in the old Polish town of Oświęcim. Those who notice the nearby shopping mall, high-school sweethearts holding hands, and nicely-dressed families headed to church, are faced with the impossible question: how can life exist in the aftermath of such overwhelming evil? Many people are unaware of the complex history, and conflate the camp and town as a death zone that should be left uninhabited. On the other hand, many residents say Oświęcim is a perfectly normal town, claiming a clear delineation between past and present.

In Oświęcim, like in centers of tragedy around the world, symbolism is projected onto spaces and inanimate objects. Residents continually negotiate between this space and their memories under the shadow of trauma. Beyond the town, the words ‘Auschwitz’ and ‘Nazi’ are so often used in the wrong context that they lose power to evoke the horror of genocide. Over time, society becomes distanced from the original pain of tragedy, leaving only the shell of symbols in its wake, both in words and images. Simplified applications of these ideas are common trump cards in discussion of discrimination, or conversely, used as false labels for minor offenses in daily life. In the absence of substantive meaning for the symbols, it often becomes difficult for rational discussion to emerge over hallowed ground.

As a grandson of a Holocaust survivor, my decision to explore Oświęcim was personally motivated. To me, Poland primarily represented the epicenter of the Holocaust. It was once the hub of Jewish life and learning in Europe, but its population was reduced to ashes during WWII. I wanted to confront these notions on my own terms and reconsider the aftermath of the Holocaust in its present-day context.

 

Bio

Brooklyn-based freelance photographer Danny Ghitis (1982) was born in Cali, Colombia and emigrated to the U.S. at a young age. After graduating in 2006 with a journalism degree from the University of Florida, he worked at the South Florida Sun-Sentinel and St. Petersburg Times newspapers. He launched a freelance career in 2008. Danny’s work is rooted in the pursuit of his own elusive cultural identity, and the desire to find common ground with others. His stories seek to reveal truths about the human condition, focusing in areas where cultural collisions interfere with progress. He believes that challenging social norms with satirical imagery can spark the curiosity needed for open dialogue in the average person. And that everyone, in turn, is capable of contributing to societal advancement.

 

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Danny Ghitis

brent clark – season’s greetings

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Brent Clark

Season’s Greetings

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Season’s Greetings is an ongoing project documenting the physical representations of Christmas in my native North Carolina. I am drawn to the luminous and imaginative beauty of Christmas, and also interested in the way that Christmas has become, to a large degree, secular and commercial. To this end, the photographs in this project contain various and often incongruent combinations of religious, commercial, and folk symbols that have become an accepted visual vocabulary and source of human expression during the otherwise cold grey winter.

 

Bio

Brent Clark is a photographer born and based in North Carolina. He earned a B.A. in Anthropology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2004, and has since pursued a career in documentary photography.

His work has been recognized by the Jen Bekman gallery, the National Press Photographer’s Association, the Venice International Photography Contest, Travel Photographer of the Year, and the International Photo Awards. His editorial clients include Popular Mechanics, Popular Photography, and AARP Bulletin.

 

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Brent Clark

laura el-tantawy – i’ll die for you

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Laura El-Tantawy

I’ll Die for You

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“I’ll Die For You” is a project that will combine still photographs and video. The work explores the epidemic of farmer suicides in rural India where over the past decade more than 200,000 farmers have committed suicide. Many had borrowed money to plant more efficient crops, but could not pay off their debts. Because of the extremely fast transition India has undergone – from a rural to an industrial, urban society with an open market – farmers have been confronted by immense social and economic disparities where the stress ultimately culminated into suicide. This has particularly affected cotton farmers in the state of Maharashtra in western India.

Since I started “I’ll Die For You” my concept has been focused on highlighting the peculiar bond between man and land. I found this relationship unique to farmers given their dependence on the land for livelihood and the equal reliance of the land on the farmers for survival. It is a relationship built on trust and nurturing, one that goes far beyond the customary attachment one has with his/her workplace or source of earning an income. For me, this bond is at the heart of the whole story. It’s a connection I have chosen to symbolically reflect in close up pictures showing the texture of farmer’s skin juxtaposed against details from the landscape. They are shot in a way that attempts to blur the distinction between man and land to show in this environment the land and its inhabitants are one and the same: when the one dies, so does the other. The work also focuses on showing emotional loss through a series of portraits and interviews focusing on the women left behind, from the widowed wives to mothers who outlived their children.

My photographic interest in a project typically stems from having some personal connection with the subject matter. When I first read farmers were committing suicide in India, I immediately thought of my grandfather who was a farmer his whole life. I wondered what circumstances could possibly drive a typically humble community into seeking such definitive measures? What would my grandfather have done? It was at that point I realized this is a story I had to tell and in December 2009 I traveled to India and started working on this project.

My goal is to ultimately highlight the plight of Indian farmers and present a story that emotionally connects people to the deep struggle this community is dealing with and show how desperation has resulted in a huge human toll. The story is about dependence of man on land and economic disparity as a catalyst for what is ultimately a human tragedy.

In 2010, “I’ll Die For You” was selected as a finalist for the Photocrati Fund for humanitarian and environmental photography and the Visura Spotlight Grant. It was selected in the main exhibition of the Noorderlicht Festival in The Netherlands (Land: Country Life in the Urban Age). The work is currently on exhibition at The Power House Arena in New York (December 17-January 20, 2011) as part of the New York Photo Festival’s juried-invitational, “Humankind”.

To support this project, please visit our Kickstarter page: http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/lauraeltantawy/ill-die-for-you-suicide-in-rural-india

 

Bio

Laura El-Tantawy is an Egyptian photojournalist and artist based in London, UK. She studied journalism & political science at the University of Georgia in Athens, Georgia (USA) & started her career as a newspaper photographer with the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel and Sarasota Herald-Tribune (USA). She became a freelance in 2006 and has since exclusively worked on self-initiated projects. Her work has been been published & exhibited in the US, Europe, Asia & the Middle East. Laura lives between the UK, her country of birth, and Egypt, where she associates most of her childhood memories.

 

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Laura El-Tantawy

I’ll Die For You

Interview at Noorderlicht

EDITOR’S NOTE:

Since the advent of the Kickstarter program , I have found it to be an interesting way to gain public funding for all kinds of projects including worthy photography efforts. So interesting in fact, that one of the things Anton and I are discussing for 2011 is our own homegrown version of  a Kickstarter style program for BURN. We cannot initiate this right now because we must study the workload and how we would actually get it done with the volunteers who work so hard for us, but our own endorsement of just a few projects a year under the umbrella of BONFIRE could again set BURN publishing efforts  out ahead.

Perhaps we would endorse up to 6 projects per year under the BONFIRE banner which would supplement our current $15,000. Emerging Photographer Fund grant for 2011 and the payments we now make to some photographers with completed essays . All we can really do here on BURN is to set a good example. We cannot fund the whole world of photography. But we can recognize unofficially  folks who do have their heart in the right place like Sara Terry and the Aftermath Project, Anthropographia, and some Kickstarter efforts by young photographers like Laura (please remember her Stay Another Day essay here on Burn). Icons like Larry Towell and others are using Kickstarter to fund worthy projects as his Afghanistan work. With BONFIRE we can lend deeply researched support to some of our BURN photographers. In any case, we will see.

The readership of Burn has been most generous. We survive literally here because of your donations. This has kept us ad free. For this I am constantly grateful. Nobody tells us what we should or should not do here on Burn. We listen to all of you of course, but we make independent decisions quite simply based on what we feel is right. While BURN 01 was an incredible publishing success, we did that book not to make money but just for our sense of pride at being associated with this remarkable audience participation effort. The small profit we did make from BURN 01 is quite literally going to be used to bring Anton, Diego, Anna and I together to meet for three days to figure out how to make BURN better for all of you. We never literally see each other. We have no office. My laptop on my mother’s dining room table right now is my office. Perfect actually. Life could not get better than this. So we just want to keep BURN as clear and as clean as is possible.

In this spirit, I wish for all of you  a holiday  that transcends boundaries  and  wish you a creatively prosperous 2011.

David Alan Harvey    December 25, 2010

thodoris tzalavras – nicosia in dark and white

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Thodoris Tzalavras

Nicosia in Dark and White

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On Your Fiftieth Anniversary
Short story by Ioanna Mavrou

Everything is quiet. The years pass like water in a stream. You sit and wait patiently and impatiently. You can’t decide if you’re happy that nothing bad happens, or sad that nothing happens. You can’t be sure but you think you were lucky. You are alive. You have mementos of the time before the war. You have mementos of the war too. You wonder if broken countries can be put back together and what kind of glue is necessary for such a delicate operation. You are growing old and weary and your children flew to places far, like migratory birds coming back once a year, and then going away again. The TV doesn’t show the Don’t Forget places anymore and you wonder if that means you should stop remembering.

When the roadblocks opened you couldn’t help but go through, but instead of reconnecting with your family ghosts you felt betrayed that your old house would go on living without you. They smiled and stood there and held the door open for you to come in and look, but their family pictures on your old mantle told you that they would never want to leave. When you saw the sea of your youth you felt a piece of your heart sinking in it. The smell told you this was home but you doubted that any court could give it back to you.

You now have a new picture to put on your wall, a new thing to keep you up at night. The centuries aren’t comforting you anymore, history stays with history, and you feel like you’re fading into it. You raise your flag in defiance every October, of that country that could have been. You keep thinking of inappropriate jokes you don’t dare tell people, like how the whole thing was a big practical joke, payback for April Fool’s Day 1955: “Here, have a country, we swear, it will work, in fact we guarantee it.”

You are both ashamed and entertained by your wit. You think of the days when you had frappés with your friends at the Nicosia Airport café and watched the planes land and take off. You were too old to fight in 1974, too scared to not run away. You were never one to want revenge but sometimes when you follow the road that no longer takes you home you feel like crying.

The years have been kind to you, your children often say, and you don’t want to make a fuss so you don’t tell them. About the dreams that come now almost every night where you are stuck in mud on the bottom of the sea like the Kyrenia Ship, waiting for divers to dig you out. The ancient faces you see now are your own, you speak to them in Ancient Greek and tell them what they already know. That you are afraid.

(Note: On Your Fiftieth Anniversary is a work of fiction.)


Bio

Thodoris Tzalavras is a Greek photographer currently based in Nicosia, Cyprus. Nicosia in Dark and White is his first monograph.

Ioanna Mavrou writes fiction and is studying for a Masters in Creative Writing at the University of Oxford. She loves photography.


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Thodoris Tzalavras

Nicosia in Dark and White


holiday lights….

i am always telling my students and those i mentor that the most obvious and best projects are just at your front door….so it is a concept i endorse and have indeed lived…yet, i need to re-learn it all the time and the subtleties therein…so sure, it was clear and obvious that i would two years ago launch on a drive across country and do medium format work on American Family…keyed off all the work i had done on my own family…good idea, and i moved on it…what never occurred to me until a combo of  the family exhibit in Madrid last spring (which i viewed as a work in progress at the time) and something my son Bryan said to me yesterday, is  that i was indeed “done” with this project after taking the very first picture….after all, isn’t a family album complete even if there is only one picture in it ? how many pictures does a family album make? everyone always asks me regarding projects  “how do you know when you are finished?”….my usual answer is that you just “know”…you  simply feel it is done…

the incredible revelation for me on this one was that i was finished as soon as i started….so, i am done….

in other words it is a movable feast…always a work in progress and always ready to be shown at any time…..for this one there could never be an end and at any point it is finished…i can do a 15 print show as i did in Madrid , or a 100 print show , or a 1,000 print show using the contact sheets alone , or a combo and with hard copy albums and big prints and videos, well, the whole bit……a two book boxed set…one of my own family who i have documented since 13 til yesterday….and the other the med format work of families from all over my country….this of course could have no end internationally once i complete the U.S. work.

my love of family and extended family runs deep…my relationships at Burn, Magnum, NatGeo, are akin to familial bonds (often with all the drama to go with it!!)…that will lead to yet another book (trilogy?) no joke just called “Photographers (i have known)” for i have religiously documented them (i have everybody)  as well and all of my students  and Burn audience etc etc etc…for those of you who have met me, i most likely have taken your picture, right?…..so this work is family as well…

Sally Mann      Charlottesville, Virginia 2008

so, forget all of my pictures of the world ….what will be important is all the work i did “on the side”…the family snaps…yup, those will be IT i am sure….knowing that now makes me wish i had tried harder…but, i guess that is the whole point…i didn’t TRY…it simply happened….

this simple revelation is of course totally a game in my head…nothing physical has changed…nothing has happened…EXCEPT the way i am thinking about something….a something that was right in front of me…yet this,  as we all know IS everything…for those of you who have studied with me, this is a real work in progress right before your eyes….just as Road Trips and Burn have been as well…i am sure you can all see it…and feel it…there is no way to beat that which is organic…authenticity is the benchmark…

as we swing into the holiday season and the end of 2010, reflection is always our mantra….throwing out that which does not work and moving towards things which do….i doubt any of us get it exactly right, but willingness to change and push new initiatives forward is after all our being….

are you finishing something up or starting something new? or both?

yes, my holiday lights are up all year…they  get blown around in the wind, fall down, get skewed, a real work in progress….just like me..

-dah-

martin usborne – mute

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Martin Usborne

MUTE: the Silence of Dogs in Cars

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I was once left in a car at a young age. I don’t know when or where or for how long, possibly at the age of four, perhaps outside Tesco’s, probably for fifteen minutes only. The details don’t matter.  The point is that I wondered if anyone would come back: in a child’s mind it is possible to be alone forever.

Around the same age I began to feel a deep affinity with animals – in particular their plight at the hands of humans. I remember watching TV and seeing footage of a dog being put in a plastic bag and being kicked. What appalled me most was that the dog could not speak back. It’s muteness terrified me.

I should say that I was a well-loved child and never abandoned and yet it is clear that both these experiences arose from the same place deep inside me: a fear of being alone and unheard. Perhaps this is a fear we all share at some level.

The images in this series explore that feeling, both in relation to myself and to animals in general. The camera is the perfect tool for capturing a sense of silence and longing: the shutter freezes the subject for ever and two layers of glass are placed between the viewer and the viewed: the glass of the lens, the glass of the picture frame and, in this instance, the glass of the car window further isolates the animal. The dog is truly trapped.

When I started this project I knew the photos would be dark. What I didn’t expect was to see so many subtle reactions by the dogs: some sad, some expectant, some angry, some dejected. It was as if upon opening up a box of grey-coloured pencils I was surprised to see so many shades inside.

I hope that these pictures are engaging and perhaps a little amusing. I want to show that there is life in the dark places within us.

I will stop writing now and you can stop reading. Words can only get us so far. After all, we are all animals.

 

Bio

Martin Usborne was born in London in 1973 where he still works and lives (with his miniature schnauzer, Moose). He trained in architecture, then philosophy, then psychology, then 3D animation before checking his compass once more and finally settling on photography. Phew. Martin’s current work consists mainly of portraits, both human and animal, and he is particularly interested in capturing the relationship between the two whether directly (when both appear in the frame) or indirectly (as in the case of the dogs in cars, where the human’s role is implied). He strives to make his work poignant but also a little playful – he feels there is too much unremitting sadness in contemporary art photography . He has published one book, about an old man that has only once left East London, and another, about what it is like to be a dog in the recession, that is coming out in April 2011.

 

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Martin Usborne

 

the corn state…

nobody goes to Iowa for vacation….if you go to Iowa it is for a very specific reason…you are either driving to Colorado from Illinois , or to enter a Presidential primary,  or to grow corn and the animals that eat it….i can tell you for sure that Cecil and Wilma above were not responsible for the Iowa primary results pushing Barack Obama into the international spotlight….they are among America’s conservatives by label…..conservative only actually in the sense of thinking that a man ought to work hard for his family and be independent and the government should keep its hands out of just about everything…the irony of course is that without government subsidies , Cecil would have given up the family farm long ago…

yet Cecil, a hard working man of strong opinions, didn’t see it that way…he figured he was providing Americans their biggest commodity..food…of course the only food i can remember after milking cows and baling hay all one summer with uncle Cecil and aunt Wilma was in fact Wilma’s chocolate cake…but, forget politics anyway…even if you disagree with the politics of many so called middle Americans, you cannot question their basic integrity…an honest dollar for an honest days work, get the kids disciplined and off to school, fight for freedom if necessary, and get to church on Sunday…..period

our current essayist Danny Wilcox Frazier explored Iowans as no other in his first book Driftless…check it out…brilliant book…he might not have met Cecil and Wilma, but i am sure he would have recognized them quickly if fate had brought him to their front door…

nobody goes to Iowa for vacation…well, i did…as a kid i thought Iowa was the coolest place on the planet…left my beach home , just to go help clean out the chicken house….seemed like fun at the time….wanted to be a farmer even before i wanted to be a photographer…old Cecil had big hands…i always felt he would crush mine with his handshake and basically, he scared the hell out of me in general….2010 was Cecil’s last year, so i publish this little anecdote just for Wilma and  my cousins Marilyn, Doug, Lowell, Julie, Allen, Dale , and their families…

even apparent disconnected aspects of my history i figure play into the whole mix of things one way or another…what may seem important at one point, may lose significance in the long run and conversely something long ago almost forgotten may jump right in your face….all of this goes into every picture i make that truly resonates…not literally perhaps, but deep down…

what about you? do past family relationships affect you and your work? or is the present all that there is?

-dah-

danny wilcox frazier – detroit

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Danny Wilcox Frazier

A Detroit Requiem

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Detroit…the word alone incites many emotions within America’s conscience.  Detroit was the epicenter for economic equality in the U.S., the home front for the ideal of well paying jobs for the masses and a political force behind a strong middle class. Henry Ford made Detroit a boom town.  Five decades after he started, the boom began to bust. Many reasons are at the heart of Detroit’s decline: postwar industrial policies, urban planning, the 1967 race riots, UAW and auto industry management, Detroit’s political cronyism, Clinton era trade deals, and quit possibly the mobility of the automobile itself. It was the 1950’s when Detroit began the long decay that has brought the city to its present state, a time when Detroit, and America, was at its peak.

Today, Detroit is America’s poorest large city. To avoid being the nation’s perpetual murder capital, the police began cooking stats. In 2008, they claimed 306 homicides – until local reporter Charlie LeDuff discovered there were actually 375.  He also reported that in more than 70 percent of murders, the killer got away with it.  Detroit’s East Side is now the poorest, most violent quarter of America’s poorest, most violent big city. The illiteracy, child poverty, and unemployment rates hover around 50 percent. The shooting death of seven-year-old Aiyana Stanley-Jones by police on Detroit’s East Side brought national attention to this quarter.  But as the spotlight faded, the killings continued.

Detroit seemed off everyone’s radar until the collapse of the Dow and bankruptcy of GM.  As the nation and world looked for answers, Detroit came back in style.  Instead of Motown, this go around Detroit is exporting its misery. Reality TV, television dramas, the movies – all selling Detroit’s murder and despair.  The night Aiyana was accidentally shot by police, a film crew from A&E’s true-crime series The First 48 was along for the show.

Detroit is a city that still has much greatness to offer. That was not the story Charlie and I were assigned to cover for Mother Jones magazine. With 103 kids and teens murdered in Detroit between January of 2009 and July of 2010, Charlie and I were sent to cover the failure of political and civil leaders in Detroit, the failure of industry in Detroit, the failure of the federal government in Detroit, the failure of America in Detroit.

While I was in Detroit, 17-year-old Chaise Sherrors was shot and killed while giving a haircut on a porch.  We met his mother, Britta McNeal.  Britta was broken, often lost in memory while her eyes filled and sometimes tears flowed.  From her porch, she stared across the street that ran in front of her humble one-story on the East Side. She stared at a half-burnt skeleton of a house, gutted inside and out, and a constant reminder of her misery.  Britta’s grandson played in broken glass and garbage that littered the driveway of the abandoned house next door.  Gang graffiti added the only touch of color to the black and gray left behind by a fire.  Britta showed us the urn containing the remains of her 14-year-old son, De’Erion.  He too was shot on Detroit’s East Side, killed a year before his older brother.  After Chaise’s funeral, Britta will have two urns to decorate her mantel.

“I know society looks at a person like me and wants me to go away,” Britta said. “‘Go ahead, walk in the Detroit River and disappear.’ But I can’t. I’m alive. I need help. But when you call for help, it seems like no one’s there.”

Charlie LeDuff’s accompanying article in Mother Jones

 

Bio

Danny Wilcox Frazier focuses on issues of marginalized communities in the U.S. and abroad. He is a contributing photographer to Mother Jones magazine. His work has also been published by: The New York Times Magazine, TIME, Newsweek, Fortune, Forbes, Sports Illustrated, Der Spiegel, and Frontline (PBS). In 2006, Frazier was awarded the Center for Documentary Studies/Honickman First Book Prize in Photography. His book, Driftless: Photographs from Iowa, was published by Duke University Press and CDS in 2007.  Frazier then directed a documentary that confronts issues highlighted by these photographs, premiering the film in New York in 2009.  The film was nominated for an Emmy in 2010 and won a Webby for Frazier and MediaStorm that year.  In 2009, Frazier received grants from The Aftermath Project and Humanities Iowa, an affiliate of the NEH.  He was named a finalist for the W. Eugene Smith grant in 2007 and 2008.  At present, Frazier is working on his next book, Lost Nation, a look at economic and geographic isolation across America.

 

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Frazier’s essay of abandoned Detroit homes

Redux Portfolio

Driftless

 

stefan bladh – the family

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Stefan Bladh

The Family

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Stefan has been following a Turkish nomadic family for seven years. He is invited to stay as their friend and lives close together with them from time to time. He finds them through their mobile phone in various places throughout the country, living in cramped conditions without heat, electricity, clean water or proper sewer systems, in abandoned house skeletons and under motorway bridges. Difficulties with money, health care, and welfare rights take turns playing havoc on their lives, and every day is a struggle to keep the whole of the large family alive.

From the introduction to “The Family” by Stefan Bladh, published by Nouvel Publishing in March 2010:

“We lay beside each other like a rosary, feet next to faces. Me at the end next to big brother Ali, 20. On the other side is dad Hüseyin, 40; snoring. The little ones are tucked into the middle. Above us is the booming noise of traffic, it’s late summer and the air is raw and damp. I tug the blanket I stole from the hotel further up over my nose, but the bitter cold and the acrid stench of garbage, urine, and greasy food still gets through. Also, beyond that, the highway smell: exhaust fumes, asphalt, burned rubber. We sleep on randomly dug up carpets and blankets, our rest provided us by the viaduct’s concrete foundation. The night is jet black. I lay awake listening to the sound of stray dogs chasing rats in and out of refuse bins, accompanied by the whispering of people’s feet sneaking past us in the gravel.”

 

Bio

Stefan Bladh was born in 1976 in Örebro, Sweden. He is now based in Stockholm where he has been working as a professional photographer since 2002. He spends most of his time traveling and working in middle Asia and eastern Europe.

Photographer Anders Petersen states in a brief afterward of the book: “Stefan is invited both as a friend and a photographer and he is aware of the responsibility this invitation brings. You´ll find his pictures full of despair and tenderness, focusing on the humanity we share. He knows that photography is not all about photography. In the end, it is the encounter that matters the most.”

The book The Family is available from PhotoEye

Related links

www.stefanbladh.se

www.nouvelpublishing.com

gianluca tamorri – the hornet’s nest

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Gianluca Tamorri

The Hornet’s Nest

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San Luca, a remote hill top town in southern Italy, is the ancestral home and principal headquarters of a criminal organization that has emerged as the country’s most powerful and dangerous mafia, the ‘Ndrangheta.’ San Luca was an unfortunate city even before the mafia took over; a succession of tragedies scar its history. In December 1972, a flood destroyed the beautiful scenery of San Luca, tearing apart the upper section of the city, famous for being a “hornet’s nest.” Though the name originally came from the shape of the streets and buildings in the neighborhood, it is now sometimes used as a hideout for Ndrangheta fugitives.

This project was born from an encounter with Mrs. Rosy Canale, the chair of the Movement of Women of San Luca, a group engaged in the development and awareness of the village. I spent a week in San Luca, hosted by one of the families working in the neighborhood, trying to show the cultural isolation of the community. My interest is to raise awareness about a little known part of Italy that is often connected only to news reports about mafia without real understanding of social and cultural dynamics. This work is ongoing.

 

Bio

Gianluca Tamorri was born in 1971 in Rome, Italy, and currently lives in Paris. He holds degrees in political science from the University of Rome “La Sapienza,” and the Rome School of Photography. Tamorri assisted various photographers in Italy between Rome and Milan, and moved to Paris in 2005 to work with the artist Michael James O’Brien, known for his collaboration with Matthew Barney in the Cremaster series 1,2,4,5. 
Concurrently, he has worked on his own personal projects in still-life, portraiture and street photography.

 

Related links

www.gianlucatamorri.com