Monthly Archive for April, 2010

emily shevenock – residence of new hollows

X X X

Emily Shevenock

Residence of New Hollows

 

 

Poetry first published December 2009 in 2River

 

Assertions Gained from a Sensitive Influx, a Series of Sensations, and Detached Expressions and Promptings from the Imagination

[A tiny booklet; defining characteristics on the scenes of the wall and room space]:

Images notate references of the environmental climate, or a foreseen environmental proposition of an allocentric, societal observation re-marking selfhood. The climate simply alludes; contradicts; and/or complements, in variances of subjective through objective response, the scenes within an introverted, solitary self. Depending on color language and subject in a series, the latter sentence may fit in reverse, the image appearing first as the social workings and interpersonal impulses of the human condition, the inner self underlying. However fragmented or “fragmented” the idea of hollow becomes in relation to a binding by societal constraints, inherently it suggests allegorically the inhibiting of the “the artist” and her pulsation of medium. Though, this societal inhibiting should not entirely color, or become the sole factor or foundation intending the context of the book. In someway, there is no intention but to document “erratically” (“irrationally”)1 then transfer rationally into proper proportions. Proportions reason a project, changing radically from project to project, and through articulation—asymmetry is symmetry where Project 1 is in relation to Project 2, or vice versa. Although wholly contained in their own compartments, language and visuals frequently meld, becoming somewhat inseparable. I stress the melding of language and image just as I stress the document or photograph explained into further details by my inner response —which is not necessarily subjective—but an objective/detached understanding of unseen information2 in the environment combined with the understanding of the literal, outer, surface environment. More concisely, this combination reveals [objective] subtext into tangibility. Through additional surface definition to each image, the resulting visual qualities render a series into its complexity. Working with an image series until it “appears correct,” is described above, yet also intuitive. Enhanced through color language (within) or lack of color (without), the work is dealt through multiple series all at once, beginning spontaneously, sometimes predefining the message before taking any [given] image/s, though usually not. The only method always adhered to is the full frame/never cropping. Projects ultimately are layered, and can be viewed in sections, yet layer again into entire books or exhibits, including texts of short fiction and writings. The results form a cohesive, complete work in seamless fragmentation.3

 

 

Historical Relevance: Subjectivity or emotion might continually elude intra-historical relevance by appearing instead as objective expression through the immediacy of articulated perception.4

I have been writing for quite a long time. Halfway through what life has done yet not fixed, age XV, I used an inherited Japanese Topcon. It was taken to a camera shop once, then broke again and bordered useless. X X X. Artistically, I learned to use what I could, implying only that which allows itself to be used.

 

Notes:

1 Please note the necessity of placing the erratic and the irrational within quotation marks. Set more singularly [without doing so], the terms are as fit as demeaning the entire rationale of hollows, as they are ever subject to [antiquated] prejudice/s.

2 The senses are alluded to here. I make no distinction as to how many; too much theory is simply cheating (theory out of context is sincerely thrilling). Also alluded, [and] in combination are the inter-personal and intra-personal.

3 Ultimately a narrative [cohesiveness] is formed, at times aesthetics and/or content associates, or not. Attempting to differentiate between confused or cohesive in a final work is absurd. To define subtle or “subtle” is the seam [opposite]. Clarification is the penultimate in seamless fragmentation.

4 Biography; specifically the artist’s— Please note historical relevance [goes] hollow. This again is allusion to the allegory, but even the allegory negated, it interrupts any intra-binding to rigid boundaries. This is a voluntary; intra-history pauses [during the project] then [perhaps or sometimes] repeats itself during other courses of the non-project.

 

 

Other Shows and Publications from The Residence of New Hollows:

 

INVISIBLE CITY, ISSUE 4, DANGEROUS BODIES, JULY/AUG 2009

SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA

5 photographs selected from the essays “Baby Pillow” and “Bard Motel,” www.invisiblecity.org

Online magazine exploring the “contemporary theoretical idea” curated by Marlaina Read

 

POSTCARDS FROM THE EDGE, JAN 2009

METRO PICTURES, NEW YORK, NY

4 x 6 ink-jet print, origins of toned silver gelatin, titled Glasses from the series Markings

1/10 sold for Visual AIDS though the gallery auction

2/10 sold by gallery placing me in contact with art collector

 

 

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Emily Shevenock

 

kevin sweeney – family/self

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Kevin Francis Sweeney

Family/Self

play this essay

 

Family/Self is a twenty-four hour cross-section of my immediate family. My family is a subject I know intimately but seldom consider with more than a snapshot. We are three individuals living together with common and individual goals that are sometimes at odds. This essay depicts a slice of an amorphous entity that does not represent the whole or even the surface adequately, but perhaps only the structure at a single point in time. These photographs are the result of a last day  attempt to complete a photo essay for a David Alan Harvey workshop in my new home of Austin, Texas. The workshop was organized by the Austin Center for Photography to coincide with the South by Southwest Music Festival.

Although there were numerous photographic opportunities to look at the mix of both traditional Texas and “weird” Austin culture, I found it hard to escape the needs of my family. I documented one twenty-four hour period at home because frankly I had a deadline and no time to photograph anything else.

I am a documentary photographer and graphic designer, and my wife is a physician. We have a three-year-old daughter and two dogs. All of us are trying to negotiate between time for each other and time for ourselves. When we are working we think about home. When we are home, we think about work. We enjoy spending time together, but when the moments become mundane we tend to veer off on our own. When we have time for our own leisure or personal pursuits, we often feel guilty that we are away from each other. These images were taken from one afternoon to another during my daughter’s spring vacation. We spent the day at home and went out to dinner with friends. The following morning, there was no school or work but by afternoon we all had things we wanted to do. For me this was an exercise to find a new perspective of my family as well as myself. In the end it was time well spent with my wife and daughter.

 

Bio

Kevin Francis Sweeney is a documentary photographer and graphic designer. Born in Karachi, Pakistan in 1973, he grew up in Houston, Texas. He is a graduate of Tulane University and the School of Visual Arts. He has shown his work in several group exhibitions at the Design Center of Austin, Texas, the Circulo de Bellas Artes in Madrid, Spain, the Visual Arts Museum in New York, the Silver Eye Center for Photography in Pittsburgh, and in the Galerie Deset at the Waldes Museum in Prague. Kevin is completing a long-term personal project titled Sixteen Sundays: Worshiping the Pittsburgh Steelers. He currently lives in Austin, Texas with his wife and daughter.

 

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Kevin Sweeney

 

dmitry markov – awkward age

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Dmitry Markov

Awkward Age

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I grew up in a small Russian town in a family of factory workers. The part of the town where I lived was rough: the only available place of work (the factory) had been closed, and as an outcome most of adults drank much and we being left alone lounged away time roaming the streets. We constantly had fights and problems with a school and police. At the age of 16 I wrote an article in a local newspaper about my friends who were doing heroin. The article evoked a wide response and public attention and was rewarded. Thereby I got fascinated with journalism. At the age of 20 my new interest let me leave my native town and helped me to avoid those deplorable consequences which my friends come across with. By that time many of them were not already alive or were put in prison.

In 2005 by chance I visited a boarding school during one of my volunteer trips. In some months’ period I left the job in a newspaper and started working closely as a volunteer with non-commercial organizations and foundations which helped and supported orphans. I was getting on well with the youngsters from the boarding school, most of them had the similar problems I’d experienced when was of the same age.

In summer 2005 I volunteered in a boarding school for disabled children in Pskov region. I was very impressed by the actual state of thing regarding such children, by their hopeless living. Therefore I decided to move to Pskov region to start working with those children. During the next three years we successfully realized several local projects with disabled orphans. Effective 2009 we started a new project “Children’s village” where several elder children from the boarding school are learning to live on their own under the supervision of two tutors.

Looking at my foster children I often recall my own childhood. On the one hand I want to help them to avoid serious mistakes which could ruin or influence their further lives. It is not easy. This is the age when you think you know how to live properly, this is the age when you often ignore advice of the grown-ups. On the other hand I would like to draw the society’s attention to the problems of these children which are sometimes difficult to resolve alone without one’s help and support.

 

Bio

I was born in 1982, in Moscow region. After finishing school I studied at the Faculty of Philology and actively wrote for youth magazines and newspapers on a voluntary and part-time basis. Being a 3rd year student I left the University as I was proposed a position of a full- time reporter in one of the prints. Later on during four years, I worked in a Russian weekly newspaper “Argumenty i Facty” (Arguments and Facts) where most of my articles were devoted to social issues and youth’ problems.

Nowadays, I am a volunteer of several non-commercial organizations: charitable organization “ROSTOK”, education fund “ROOF”, fund “Detskiedomiki”, the Pskov branch of the “Russian Children’s Fund”, Austrian fund “Kleine Herzen” and several informal volunteer unions. The author of several albums, publications and photo exhibitions dedicated to the problem of orphanage in Russia. I am working as a tutor in the Children’s Village and taking part in the other current projects. We’ve been attracting many volunteers and are actively dealing with the region’s mass media and local social welfare authorities.

I hope that my photos have not the small share in drawing the attention of benefactors, volunteers and journalists. I do hope that they help the society to look at the problems of such children in a humane way.

 

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Dmitry Markov

 

manjari sharma – the shower series

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Manjari Sharma

The Shower Series

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For the last few months I have been inviting people to visit my apartment and allow me to photograph them in a very intimate space; my bathroom. I have also been inviting them to take a shower as I continue to shoot them. I soon came to the observation that warm water running over my subjects bodies often relieved them of any unnerving awkwardness the camera brought about. Once they were relaxed, the bathroom, formerly a beauty parlour, now became a confessional and I the hair dresser. Many of my subjects shared intimate details of their life with me and every new person in the shower became a brand new allegory. With every new visit I had a new protagonist; A new plot and a new parable of hurt and heroic that came undone under that shower – My Shower. I felt a personal mythology was being shared in that shower. An independent study that I have gotten addicted to.

Secretly I have been told by my subjects that it is thrilling and adventuresome to be in my shower; Secretly cheating my traditional and tame Indian upbringing I live through all of my subjects. Fighting their wars and braving their fears for those few hours where we are connected through this pious space.I continue to investigate this enthralling photo project which has thus far given rise to some of the fastest, most disarming relationships I have formed. I look forward to these images leading the way as the project continues.

As I have found time and again what I set out to consume, consumes me. Based on the root structure of my cultural upbringing, ardent seeking is an act of submission. A project, whether photographic or not, begins with placing good faith in the unknown. When I suspend the illusion of a plausible predestined fiasco, I start to make my pictures with two most elemental givens, myself and the person in the frame. As the project progresses, A sentience of the self dissolves, leaving behind a distilled remainder… the subject and the story.

This Essay solely began as a labor of love, I was driven by a mad passion and desire to document the sensory overload i personally experienced. The texture, the drama, the undeniable sexuality, the relief, it was all there. But when I photographed the first person in that shower, it was nothing but a response to the visual. So when it started out, it was very tangible and measurable; But as it progressed it gathered the moss only a rolling stone can round up. It became a lot more than light and water. it became about what I shared with this person for that finite length of time and what we were willing to give up to be in that bath tub together as we willing broke social norms. I want this project to communicate that the drive it took to make these images is the drive I aim to sustain as an artist. If this project is any measure, then I want to be recognized and known for my ability to connect, collaborate and create.

 

Bio

I was born and raised in Mumbai, India, A terrific country, but I guess you have to go away to love it again. Chasing photography is what brought Manjari to the US in 2001; She graduated in 2004 but moved back to India to reconnect with her roots. Manjari moved to New York City in late 2007 and some of her recent achievements include 8 honorable mentions at the Lucie awards. Manjari was recognized as a winner for the NYC Strand Photo contest in 2009. Manjari’s work has been included in Centre for Fine Art photography, NYC Slideluck Potshow 2009 and her image was selected for the PDN photo of the day blog in Nov ’09. Manjari was one of six people selected for an exclusive workshop with Jörg Colberg and Robert Lyons in fall 2009 and her work is scheduled to be featured on NYMphoto blog early 2010. Manjari’s ongoing shower series will be spotlighted as a feature for PDN.EDU for their spring 2010 issue and her current selected clients include AOL, American Baby, Penguin Books and AARP. Manjari currently lives and freelances in NYC.

 

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Manjari Sharma

 

ryan gauvin – deep roots/fresh cut

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Ryan Gauvin

Deep Roots/Fresh Cut

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I passed my thesis defense on Thursday afternoon and by Sunday I was out of Toronto, driving back across Canada to Vancouver. A week later I was at the golf course where I’d spent the last seven summers cutting grass to pay for two degrees and to fund my documentary photo projects. I still owed around $25,000 for the MFA – about two more summers work. The golf course had been sold to a new company since the last year, but everything was the same. The coffee tasted like machinery, the mud room smelled like a wet dog, and the golfers still looked down on us. I was happy to be back though, amongst friends and away from fine art politics and the commercial bias of news media, both of which I grew frustrated with during my two years in Toronto. I started packing my camera and a pocket full of Tri-X to work with me in the morning, mostly to stay sharp until I could afford to start another project.

Looking at the photos now, I see inklings of something deeper than just pictures of my friends at work, but it’s something I can’t quite put my finger on. My girlfriend says it looks like the work of a Marxist, but I don’t think that is it. Maybe it’s the struggle of emerging as a documentary photographer manifest in the day-to-day grind of a greens keeper.The tension with golfers and clubhouse management, the tight community, the exhaustion, the solitude, the stubborn determination. Or maybe it’s none of that at all.

 

Bio

Ryan Gauvin is a documentary photographer based in Vancouver, Canada. He holds a BA in Geography from Simon Fraser University, and an MFA in Documentary Media from Ryerson University. Ryan also attended the Eddie Adams Workshop in 2009. In the past he has partnered with the International Campaign for Tibet, and his work has been published internationally. Ryan was recently recognized at the 2009 New York Photo Awards and 2009 PX3 Prix de la Photographie Paris for his work in Tibet. He is currently in the research stage of a documentary photography project on the use of depleted uranium warheads in the Balkans.

 

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Ryan Gauvin