Monthly Archive for January, 2010

Emerging Photographer’s Fund grant 2010


The paraguayans

8×10 moonlight photograph by Alejandro Chaskielburg, 2009 EPF recipient, from his essay The High Tide



DEADLINE EXTENDED to May 1st, 2010


We now announce on Burn our third annual Emerging Photographer Fund grant …for 2010 we are offering a $15,000. stipend for an emerging photographer to finish an ongoing personal project…the deadline for entries will be April 15, 2010….funding for the EPF comes from generous anonymous donations from our audience here on Burn to the non-profit  Magnum Cultural Foundation…these are very specific donations to the MCF and are apart from the general subscriptions and donations to Burn….

this year we must set up things a bit different from the last two years…we have no choice but to have a $25. entry fee per submission….last year almost killed Anton Kusters and yours truly with the almost 1200 submissions….we cannot do that again…this year the $25. will be well spent…we will be using a program called Slideroom to facilitate you entering and us having the grant juried in a first class manner…..with Slideroom you open a free account and you will literally have a “room” where you can work on your edit for the next two months…i.e. put in one picture today, four next week, change your edit, play with the pictures, do whatever you want, then hit the  submit button on or before deadline..if you decide not to enter after all the editing etc., then simply do not hit submit and you are not charged…the system is way easier to use for all  than anything before and makes it possible for us to have a wide prestigious jury (to be named soon) who can view your work at their leisure online and yet be communicating with each other all along…

so the financial breakdown is:  $8. will go for this  Slideroom program which is of great benefit to all of us (this is their fee to us per entrant)…$5. will go to a Haitian relief agency…and $12. will go to cover our admin costs for the EPF at Burn,and the costs associated with creating a sophisticated slide show and presentation of finalists and winner at this  summer’s one time special Burn/Look3 event for emerging photographers in June…we realize this fee may keep some from entering….we considered this and came up with the lowest price we possibly could and still be able to continue this grant program at all …we do not feel this fee will discourage any serious entrants…

all details for the correct entering of project essay submissions will be seen under EPF 2010 in the right hand column of Burn…

i look forward to seeing all the new work….

-david alan harvey


The EPF grant 2010 submission link:

http://burn.slideroom.com


Deadline for submission: May 1st, 2010

The winner will be announced in June, 2010


imants krumins – etrouko the book I

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Imants Krumins

Etrouko the Book I

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“Etrouko the book I” ………. these are some of the images that will appear in the book, they are not photographs they are about photography.

I anticipate a book in print soon……….

 

Bio

………. lived most of my life in Australia

Exhibited on the Continent, The New World and The Old World………. No awards. no prizes, no commissions, no nothings etc

Author of some current Visual Arts textbooks

 

Music by Kevin MacLeod

 

Related links

Imants Krumins

Artouko

Etrouko

I am paranoid

 

Editor’s note:

comments are open on this essay….

-david alan harvey

adam smith – fight journal

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Adam Smith

Fight Journal

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There is a moment before the fight when the rhythmic sound of warm-up punches and nervous chatter dissolves into a quiet stillness.

This moment only lasts a second or two. No one in the room says anything. There is nothing else to say.

Everyone knows what is about to happen. Months of intense training, sacrifice, pain, and fear will explode in a fury of disciplined aggression: A beautifully brutal storm of ugliness and heart.

They know that when it is over, the two fighters will stand in the cage, naked in their victory or their defeat. Each knowing the implication of the outcome: that had it not been for the rules, an instrument of mercy that stopped the fight, one could have killed the other.

This is Mixed Martial Arts.

Often referred to as cage fighting, it is one of the fastest growing sports in North America.

“Fight Journal”, shot over the last 12 months, profiles a group of professional and amateur fighters from the Pacific Northwest.

 

Bio

I am a freelance documentary photographer based in Seattle, Washington. I am primarily interested in using documentary photography to create anthropological records that show how people live today. Clients include Cole & Weber United, Tree Top Inc., Capella, Seattle Metropolitan Magazine, and Book-It Repertory Theatre.

I am also working on several long term documentary and fine art personal projects, of which Fight Journal is one.

 

Related links:

Adam Smith

 

Editor’s note:

Please only one comment per person under this essay.. Further discussions should take place under Dialogue..

Many thanks… david alan harvey

james nachtwey – struggle to live

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James Nachtwey

Struggle to Live – the fight against TB

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James Nachtwey has documented the resurgence of tuberculosis and its varying strains MDR and XDR in seven countries around the world. These countries include Cambodia, Lesotho, South Africa, Siberia, India, Swaziland, and Thailand. He has captured the lives of both patients and health care workers in the struggle against this ancient disease, which still remains very much a part of the present. Not only does TB remain a killer disease in its most recognizable form but it is mutating into even more deadly forms: multi-drug resistant (MDR) and extremely drug resistant (XDR) TB. While still a small subset of the TB cases, these new strains pose a grave global health threat. XDR-TB is a man-made catastrophe, resulting from too few resources being allocated for the proper diagnosis and treatment of TB patients in developing countries.

“Despite the fact that tuberculosis afflicts a huge number of people it’s not on the radar screen in terms of public awareness. Normal tuberculosis, if diagnosed and treated diligently, is very inexpensive and doesn’t take very long to cure. But if normal TB is not treated, it mutates and becomes 100 times more expensive, requires a two-year cure and a long stay in the hospital, which many of those infected cannot afford. The thought of XDR getting out of control is truly frightening,” says James Nachtwey.

 

Bio

James Nachtwey’s career as a war photographer began in 1981 when he covered civil unrest in Northern Ireland. Since then he has photographed more than 25 armed conflicts as well as dozens of critical social issues. He has received the Robert Capa Gold Medal, World Press Award, Magazine Photographer of the Year, and I.C.P. Infinity Award multiple times. He has been named recipient of the TED Prize, the Heinz Foundation Award for Art and Humanities, the Common Wealth Award and the Dan David Prize. “War Photographer”, a documentary about his work, was nominated for an Academy Award in 2002. His photographs are in the collections of the Museum of Modern Art and the Bibliotheque Nationale de France, among others. Nachtwey has been a contract photographer with TIME Magazine since 1984 and is a founding member of the photo agency VII.

 

Exhibition

401 PROJECTS

present

Struggle to Live – the fight against TB by James Nachtwey

401 west street NY, NY 10014

on view from:
january 20, 2010 to march 25, 2010

 

 

Related links

James Nachtwey
xdrtb.org
www.viiphoto.com

 

Editor’s note:

I am very proud to be able to publish here on Burn our first sponsored photographer essay. This has literally been months in the making and representatives from BD came to us with James Nachtwey’s  blessing after our Burn presentation at the Look3 festival.

This will be revolutionary for Burn and the industry and perhaps serve as a model for future  online sponsorship for photographers. As most of you know, this has been my goal all along. To be able to pay photographers for online representation of their work with rates as good or better than current print rates for major publications.

We are starting by kicking the door down with James Nachtwey. However, in all of my discussions with BD and some other potential sponsors, my primary intent is to provide funding for the emerging photographers who are what Burn is all about. I intend for the ratio of iconic photographers like Jim to emerging photographers to be one to three. One icon, three emerging. I want to see a world where the icons lend a hand to the next generation of serious photographers in documentary and in art. By starting with this model, I hope I can help make this come true. At least now, we have a real start. I will continue to work to complete the circle.

For those of you who feel they should be “in the mix, in the running”, make sure I know your work. Either by submitting work to Burn or the EPF or by knocking on my door. This is happening. Now.

Customizing sponsors to specific photographers and projects must be taken very seriously. Matching the right funding to the right photographer is  imperative to the sponsor , to the photographer, and to Burn. This is where the net can excel. The nature of the net allows this to happen, and because we are a small operation, we can offer premium exposure and minimal investment to qualified sponsors, pay the photographer well, maintain all photographer copyrights, and bring enough income into Burn so that we can best serve more photographers and readers/writers in the long run.

At Burn, we are now in a position to customize sponsors with photographers and/or subject matter to be assigned. While this work in the Nachtwey essay was photographed prior, our goal is to finance original photography as well. We have the ability to build out an essay/project so that the sponsor is 100% pleased and the photographer is 100% pleased as well. On this one, and in everything we will build in the future, the sponsor and the photographer and we at Burn become symbiotic in nature.

We are very flattered here at Burn that a leading medical technology company like BD would choose our humble magazine to make their first online general magazine funding. We are equally flattered that James would choose Burn as well. So, we have done all we can to make it more than right for both parties.

We will do the same for whoever comes next.

-david alan harvey

 

This presentation was made possible through the kind support of:

bd-small

 

adrián arias – harvest of man

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Adrián Arias

Harvest of Man

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This story is about the everlasting relationship between man and land. I was always fascinated to see how such ancient labours have survived through the ages in such difficult conditions for their workers.

“Harvest of Man” is a portrait of the population of potato growers in the areas of Cot and Tierra Blanca de Cartago in Costa Rica, creating a link between the life of workers in the field and their family life. My intention was to use the camera as an excuse to get into the daily lives of these people. Each of the visits to the area led me in a particular way, putting aside preconceptions about this population. As a result, the photographic process is a testimony to the relationship I had with the potato growers.

 

Bio

Adrian Arias was born in Costa Rica in 1982. He currently works as a photographer of Colectivo Nómada in Costa Rica. He has worked as a contributor to Costa Rican newspapers and magazines, such as La Nación and Soho. He has attended photography workshops with Bruce Gilden, Antoine D’Agata, Kosuke Okahara of Agence Vu and Essdras Suarez of the Boston Globe, and participated in international exhibitions in Argentina, and Toronto and in various exhibitions of documentary photography in his country.

 

Related links

http://colectivonomada.com/fotografos/aarias/#portafolio

 

Editor’s note:

Please only one comment per person under this essay.. Further discussions should take place under Dialogue..

Many thanks… david alan harvey

david degner – uighur identity in xinjiang

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david degner

Uighur Identity in Xinjiang

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The Uighurs of Xinjiang are one of 55 minorities in China, but they are ethnically and historically closer to the Muslim Turkic groups of Central Asia.  The Chinese government is trying to cement its hold on the resource rich Xinjiang by suppressing cultural and religious differences in schools and workplaces and by resettling millions of eastern Chinese into the wild western region.

Racism, language requirements and lack of education prevents many young Uighurs from getting contemporary jobs while their traditional roles as traders and farmers have become unprofitable. As Chinese influence increases, Uighurs must adapt to the Chinese way or be left behind economically.

I arrived in Xinjiang about 5 months before the Olympics and spent that time learning the area and making contacts.  There has been a longstanding separatist movement consisting of attacks on police and government buildings.  My plan was to be in Xinjiang during the Olympics in case something broke out.  A few weeks before the Olympics started I was in a rural area near Kazakhstan looking into reports of a torched police station.  While in the small town of San Gong the police picked me and revoked my Visa, kicking me out into Kazakhstan.

 

Bio

David Degner is researching his next project while shooting commercial and journalistic jobs in South Florida.

These photographs will be shown at the Christopher Henry gallery in SoHo in the near future.

 

Related links

IncendiaryImage

 

Editor’s note:

Please only one comment per person under this essay.. Further discussions should take place under Dialogue..

Many thanks… david alan harvey

chloe dewe mathews – hasidic holiday

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Chloe Dewe Mathews

Hasidic Holiday: The Annual trip to Aberystwyth

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For over 20 years, British orthodox Jews have been holidaying in the Welsh seaside town of Aberystwyth, for two weeks every summer. Each family rents a small house in the empty student accommodation on the hill, and a large yellow and white striped tent is erected on the campus as a temporary synagogue.

They arrive in large groups, followed by huge removals lorries, bringing all their possessions from home, including children’s bikes, cookers and fridges full of food. Around a thousand people make the trip each year and although the majority of families come from North London, there are many others from further afield – from Manchester, continental Europe, Jerusalem and New York.

The Jewish community have been going to Aberystwyth instead of other traditional English seaside towns, like Blackpool or Brighton, as somewhere quieter, less populated and surrounded by rural beauty.  Over the years, the community have developed a real affection for the area, with accumulated associations of the annual family holiday.

After a morning of prayer, family groups rattle up the funicular “cliff railway”, push buggies along the pier and spend hours in the playground next to the ruined castle. The visual landscape of Aberystwyth is briefly transformed. Men in long dark coats and brimmed hats wander along the promenade as young families set up on the beach. Fully clothed even when swimming, the sight of these large family units together on the beach rekindles the Victorian notion of traditional British seaside holidays. This is in marked contrast to the rest of the beach goers – dog walkers, hobbling pensioners, single parent families and 20 something students still up from the night before.

Despite the long-standing relationship with the town, there is little contact or exchange between the Jewish community and the local people. On one occasion a visitor enquired at the tourist office, “Why are there were so many people in Welsh national dress on the beach?” on another it was asked, “When do the Arabs arrive?” Perhaps they get relatively less attention than they would elsewhere, as the town is so isolated, with a small tourist influx each year. However, multiculturalism has only come to rural Wales very recently, so although moments of confrontation are rare, they seem almost inevitable.

This year scraps of paper with swastikas on them were found littering the road near the student accommodation and a group of youths in the town centre chanted nazi slogans as a Jewish man walked by.

 

Bio

Chloe Dewe Mathews is a freelance photographer based in London.

After graduating in Fine Art at the Ruskin in Oxford, she worked in the commercial film industry for three years. Both inspired and frustrated she turned to photography, as a more immediate and intimate creative process. Working with different people in their natural environment, enabled her to engage with the world more directly.

She has been published in the Times, the Independent and Dazed and Confused magazine, and exhibited in London, Birmingham, Buenos Aires and Berlin.

Related links:

Chloe Dewe Mathews

 

Editor’s note:

Please only one comment per person under this essay.. Further discussions should take place under Dialogue..

Many thanks… david alan harvey

igor posner – notes from underground

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Igor Posner

Notes from Underground

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It started in 2006, a year when I returned to St. Petersburg for the first time in 14 years.  At the time I had no idea what I wanted to get out of this place, photographically anyway. I just knew that I wanted to immerse myself into its cold, gloomy winter and take pictures. Trip after trip as images started to appear I noticed that somehow the pictures started to reconstruct this city’s heavy, yet poetic soul, like captured by Dostoevsky, Mandelstam, Bely, Brodsky and others.

Excerpt from a personal diary (February, 2008):

“Leningrad creates a feeling of a lost and a haunted city, an open nerve, where little tragedies of every day life that seem universal are so acutely brought to surface…with its bars, streets, drunks, communal apartments this place creates a sense of an inexistent dream within an authentic nightmare, and yet paradoxically conveys a feeling of poetic nostalgia and melancholy.”

Images used in this slideshow are chapter fragments from a book project about St. Petersburg (2006-2009) – “Notes from Underground” (working title).

Music by Alfred Schnittke – In Memoriam II, tempo di valse

Special thanks to: Olya Vysotskaya, Anna Bocharova

 

Bio

Born in St. Petersburg (former Leningrad), Russia, Igor Posner moved to Los Angeles, California in the early 90s. Early work includes photographs taken in south-central and downtown Los Angeles, Tijuana, Mexico.  Igor returned to Russia in 2006, taking up photography full time.

In 2007, Igor moved from Los Angeles to New York City. At present, he lives between St. Petersburg, Russia and New York.  Currently he works on two series: first, about Russian immigrant communities in Brooklyn and LA, and second, about former Jewish ghetto settlements in Russia, Western Ukraine and Belarus.

 

Related links

Igor Posner

 

Editor’s note:

please only one comment per essay….

-david alan harvey

thomas freteur – abu sakha…

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Thomas Freteur

Abu Sakha…

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Mohammed Abu Sakha used to be a normal, cheerful kid, despite the violence he witnessed in the West Bank in 2004. In 2008, he joined the first Palestinian circus school, an organization that trains Palestinian children from various West Bank cities throughout the year. When summer comes, they hit the road, taking the kids for a Mobile Circus Tour.

“I feel circus brings me the chance to send my message from Palestine to the world”, he tells. “I don’t speak English very much so I can’t communicate with everybody outside of Palestine. Circus brought me that chance. I can use it as a expression tool to tell our stories.”

I followed Mohammed in August 2009 during a tour of the circus.

In the night of August 24th 2009, the Israeli Occupation army surrounded the house of Mohammed Abu Sakha in the old city of Jenin. His parents were told that they just wanted to talk to him outside, but instead they took him and put him into jail. At that point, Mohammed had just turned 18. He was accused of throwing stones at one of the Israeli attacks in 2004 during the second Intifada – at which point he was 13 years old.

 

Bio

In 2005, I was 25 years old and I shared the same passion about photo documentary with three friends. We founded the photographers’ collective “Out of Focus”, based in Brussels.  Since then, I usually work for local associations and NGO’s. I am also doing a personal project concerning circus around our world like the Palestinian Circus School. It’s more about daily life than shows, and more particularly about the use of art in conflict situations such as occupied territories.

For the two last years, I also coordinate with the collective specific exhibitions. We regularly spread our images out of their usual context by exhibiting in the streets and open spaces. An interesting way to generate reflection…

 

Related links

Thomas Freteur – Out of Focus

 

Editor’s note:

Please only one comment per person under this essay.. Further discussions should take place under Dialogue..

Many thanks… david alan harvey

jerome brunet – cops

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Jérôme Brunet

Cops: Riding Shotgun with Texas Sheriffs

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When asked why I’m interested in law enforcement, I’m compelled to reply, “We all should be.”  The fact that we know so incredibly little about our ‘boys in blue’ all though we see them on our street corners and of course in more dramatized versions on television and in Hollywood, I’ve always been interested in the symbolic aspect of the modern day police officer; the man with the badge, gun and authority to dramatically change a persons life forever. Societies apparent answer to all life’s little and not so little problems. However bleak and insignificant a situation may seem, officers are constantly dealing with lost children, family quarrels, various assemblies of homeless and confronting each day, the violence and corruption humanity inflicts on each other everyday.

During the six months I spent with a multitude of Deputy sheriffs in El Paso county, south west Texas in 1997, I had the rare opportunity to follow and record the everyday activities of these men and women. I managed to capture a few strong moments of the out-of-the-ordinary happenstance’s of these law enforcement officers, people not unlike you and I who share varying difficult tasks ranging from the mundane routine of pages of paperwork to absolute, life threatening danger, ugliness, insanity which ultimately leads to an inevitable breakdown of values and morals. This is an account, albeit brief, of a police officers job description.

These ‘Wild West’ ancestors keep somewhat true to their past. The majority of the men and women I interacted with were primarily Hispanic. Because of their ancestry they were able to bring forth a much appreciated warmth and understanding that I and, I’m sure, the rest of the townspeople, who were also Hispanic, enjoyed and accepted openly. I was first impressed with the equipment used by the officers, with a ‘larger-than-life’ resemblance to the grandiose American lust for “bigger is better” with such names as Chevrolet, Harley-Davidson, Ray Ban, Smith & Wesson. However, as the weeks wore on I watched these officers who exuded obvious professionalism accomplish their missions ranging from routine I.D. checks to reports, endless hours spent on surveillance duty which sometimes ended up being hundreds of kilometers down dirt roads to the sudden adrenaline rush during a dangerous bust.

Murphy’s Law never became so evident until this project. A law explaining the fact that things have a tendency to happen when you least expect it or as one of the deputies so eloquently described it. “It’s when the shit hits the fan!”. After hours of uninterrupted patrolling with a K-9 unit on a grave yard shift, we pulled up to the local truck stop on the I-10 highway. Apart from the lonely truck driver stirring his coffee endlessly, only one table at the back of the restaurant was occupied.  All deputy sheriffs and one stray highway patrol officer.  You can only imagine what might go on in their minds as you sit at a table like this one. Conversations running from family life to pay cuts, shoptalk to the guy that got away. You would catch the odd lost gaze out the window into a universe unknown to most.  A place where many do not return.  It’s only after receiving your meal ordered off a menu mainly composed of picture that the dispatch calls out “to all available officers code 10-50” — a hit and run victim.  As quickly as we had arrived, we leave our untouched food behind, bolting for the door.  With sirens blazing, an agitated dog shifts from side to side, tension mounts.  To the untrained eye, the scene looks like total havoc, lights flashing in every direction, flares are scattered across a four lane intersection, a small white object catches my attention, it’s a shoe roughly ten meters from where the victim is lying.  Paramedics surround the body trying to keep its pulse.  The feeling of helplessness overwhelms me as a medical helicopter lands directly behind us, and two doctors try to revive him, it is too late.  After a grueling hour of unsuccessful tries, the body is covered with a white sheet.  Time of the deceased – 4:30 am. To my knowledge, no one was arrested for this senseless brutal act.  It was only then that we returned to the uneventful truck stop. Just another day in the life of the deputy sheriff.

Certain photographs betray a mood of pending violence when an ordinary family quarrel may well end up in a blood bath. In this respect, the bullet proof vest worn under the shirt of all these cop’s is highly revealing, (which in some cases I wore myself). Besides, the repression of drug trafficking constitutes the major part of the work done by this border police force. Roads linking Mexico to the U.S., such as the I-10, are sensitive arteries of a flourishing contraband. Even though another deputy in a deep sigh, admitted to me catching only ten percent of the actual traffic, a task force made up of U.S. Customs, D.E.A., Texas and New Mexico police have seized over 30 kilos of heroin, 2 tons of cocaine and 75 tons of marijuana. Even though these quantities sound enormous, actually landing on a large bust was a different story, only luck and perseverance enabled me to land on what was to be one of US’s largest single drug bust in US’s history.  As a nervous Mexican driver arrives at the U.S. border and a routine check is made on his car, officers reveal neatly packed away in the trunk, 23.3 pounds of black tar heroin, estimated at 24 million dollars. This package is later revealed to the local press in Hollywoodesque fashion. I watch in amazement and think of the outcome of this Mexican peasant paid 1000 dollars to transport this load into the land of the free.

Texas, the second largest  state in the U.S. also boasts the highest rate of incarceration (700 for 100 000).  In an ultramodern county jail of El Paso, Texas, I witnessed different aspects of “the inside world”. Body searches, finger printing and delousing before the anonymous inmate dons the regulation blue overalls inscribed E.P.C.D.F. (El Paso County Detention Facility). On the top floor is the outdoor gym, from which you can admire the end of the Rocky Mountains and the beginning of the Sierra Madre into Mexico. Caged like lions, 40 federal prisoners await transport to a large prison. I am placed alone with one guard in this cage. Surprisingly enough, like a ghost, I hover through the crowd unnoticed, my heart beating for what felt like an eternity. Prisoners can only be exposed to the natural light of the gymnasium a sparsely granted privilege of only three hours a week. An afternoon spent with the elite S.R.T. (Sheriff Reaction Team) proved to provide more excitement. This team made up of tough looking officers is specially trained to counter an unlikely riot in the prison. I was presented a billboard full of makeshift weapons made by previous inmates, everything from hand sharpened spikes, to knives made out of tooth brush handles with razor blades attached to their ends. All used for assassination purpose by gang members thriving to in the “inside world”.

We will find in the police officers, goodness, honesty, corruption and brutality. In many cases we are the police, and like it or not we are responsible of their actions as much as our own. The more we know about them, the more we observe and tie ourselves to them, and the more this society will feel secure.

This testimony shares a few privileged moments into the life of these Texas and New Mexico cops, as well as revealing the true backdrop of American culture.

Bio:

A freelance photojournalist Jérôme Brunet was born in southern France and raised in Ontario, Canada. After obtaining his O.S.S.D. majoring in visual arts, he started his post secondary education in Paris, France, at the E.F.E.T. School of Photography, graduating in 1997. Jérôme Brunet has been published internationally in The New York Times, Financial Times, Forbes, American Photo, Rolling Stone, and Billboard. His client list includes Nikon, The Discovery Channel, Fender Musical Instruments and Gibson Guitars. Jérôme Brunet is currently working and residing in the Bay Area of San Francisco and is represented internationally by Zuma Press.

 

Related links

Jérôme Brunet

 

Editor’s Note:

Please only one comment per person under this essay.. Further discussions should take place under Dialogue..

Many thanks… david alan harvey