Monthly Archive for August, 2009

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joni karanka – last orders

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ESSAY CONTAINS EXPLICIT CONTENT

Joni Karanka

Last Orders

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Cardiff, capital of Wales, is a young city. The port that shipped coal to the empire sleeps now, yet the dwellers of the valleys still come down to the city. The night draws everybody into a high in which every act is excusable and freedom is at the reach of the fingertips. This is a chronic of Cardiff when last orders are called.

 

Bio:

Joni Karanka (Helsinki, 1981), is a member of Mindfist based in Cardiff. He is a finalist of the 2008 edition of the Emerging Photographers Fund and his work has been shown in The Night of the Year in Rencontres d’Arles and the Festival of Photography of Phnom Penh. Currently he is as involved in his own projects as in finding ways of promoting photography (such as Dr Karanka’s Print Stravaganza).

 

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Joni Karanka

Dr Karanka’s Print Stravaganza

 

Editor’s Note: Please only one comment per person under this essay.. Further discussions should take place under Dialogue..

Many thanks… david alan harvey

jason andrew – twilight country

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Jason Andrew

Twilight Country

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The Anonymous Republic of Abkhazia

Through a poetic sense of light and color, I find an attraction to the atrocities brought on by Mother Nature and mankind. The contrasting beauty between the savagery of ruin and rebirth of destroyed lives creates a romantic idea of what once was there, conveying a different feeling for each person that witnesses the images. The loneliness and solitude is what drove me to document the apocalyptic scenes of Abkhazia, its people, and how they continue to suffer from the effects of war 15 years later.

The Images take us on a sinister, eerie tour of a country whose only existence centers around their military and patriotism. Alone and stagnant, Abkhazia struggles with the meaning of war and self-declared independence, clutching the ankles of Russia for support while shadowing themselves from the economic and social embargoes imposed on them from Georgia and the rest of the world.

The countries decaying skeleton is a physical manifestation to the pain and misery suffered by the Abkhaz people and their struggles to free themselves from the iron grip of a war long gone with Georgia. Abkhazia remains desolate and wounded, a dilapidated corpse left for dead. Only the internal sense of pride and joy can be seen through the military, their beacon of light and pride. Once the Riviera of the Caucus region, Abkhazia now caters to budget conscious Russians while struggling with their own sense of independence, crawling back to Mother Russia and into her womb in search of comfort and security, unable to recover from the economic disasters of a war long past.

 

Bio:

Jason Andrew was born and raised on the coast of California where he spent his early years surfing and snowboarding while exploring the small coastal villages of Baja California. Upon graduating with a Bachelors Degree in History from San Diego State University, he began photographing for a small music label while teaching elementary school.

He later moved to NYC where he graduated from the 2006/07 Documentary Photography and Photojournalism program at the International Center of Photography where he interned with VII photographer James Nachtwey.

In 2008, he attended the Eddie Adams Workshop and his Jazzland series about an abandoned amusement park in New Orleans was selected for American Photography 24. In 2009, he was named a Magenta Emerging Photographer and is currently among the “Emerging Talents” of Reportage by Getty Images.

His clients and publications include AOL, Courrier International, Le Monde 2, National Geographic Books, New York Magazine, Transworld Surf and Ventiquattro.

 

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Jason Andrew

 

 

Editor’s Note: Please only one comment per person under this essay.. Further discussions should take place under Dialogue..

Many thanks… david alan harvey

d. ude – kite board lift off

Wendi Palmer

 

Kite Board Lift Off  by  D. Ude

 

Avid kite boarder Wendi Palmer, “lives, breathes and dreams about kite boarding constantly” she says.  “There is no feeling as free as being pulled into perfect wave by a kite and being able to shut the kite off and surf the wave, then pull out and do it all over again”.  Wendi practices her art around Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, on both ocean and sound side, where the heritage of pirates, shipwrecks, and violent storms segues into the present summertime warm lusty winds and choppy waters.

stray cat….

stray cat


i am not a cat person….never had a cat as a pet…never wanted a  cat…..i was always a dog man ….dogs were always happy to see me, followed me around…dogs responded to commands…..cats always just seemed aloof to me….now, i have a cat…..

on the fourth of july,  a hot summer night, little Simone just showed up….my son Bryan and his love Michelle and i were sitting on my porch having a glass of wine and  pretty much minding our own business ,  when along came little homeless Simone (sometimes Lulu) who just jumped into my lap….end of story…..or, should i say, beginning of story…..

now i am dealing with raccoon proof cat doors, dry food vs. wet food, auto feeding machines  and worse, yes, AFFECTION…damn!! ….the last thing i need in my life is a cat….i do not have time for a cat….i travel too much to have a cat or any pet….but, now i have a cat….or, rather she has me….she now owns the place….runs the show….wants affection sometimes, and shuns it other times….does what she wants when she wants to do it and my job is just making sure she is happy …and i now trip  all over myself to make sure this is so…..hmmmmm….

it is always the unexpected in our lives which seems to govern….all of us work so hard to plan plan plan and then , well, the “plan” becomes whatever “just happened” with perhaps a very slight twinge of the light of  original agenda….most of us i think then take whatever circumstances evolved and then turn it into our “plan” as if we had thought of it all along….pure justification or acceptance or , well, what else can we do???

certainly there must be adjustments in our creative spirit as well…if we all did what we started out to do, then i am sure that the results would be a whole lot less exciting then if serendipity rules…..yet, we also know from experience that not having any kind of plan in the beginning usually leads to no action at all…so, strange as it seems, we need a plan or a thought or an idea at the beginning that we know surely with change as we move forward…we should not be surprised that we become surprised with what actually happens , yet this is the ultimate surprise!!

perhaps we all have different proportions of planning vs. serendipity……and , of course, this is all related to being able to FINISH what we start out to do…i think many of us do not finish what we start because a Simone shows up….changes the equation….priorities get scrambled……what we want today, may not be what we want tomorrow….

i do spend a lot of time with young ambitious photographers or photographers who are trying to make a mark….the single biggest difference i see between those who “do it” and those who do not is simply the ability to finish what one starts….

yes, of course,  talent is a must…visual acuity, sensitivity, spacial awareness, timing, balance….but, given two equal talents, the one who can actually complete a body of work  is the one who will rise….sounds simple, but it is the most complex compound  of all things facing any creative person….i see it over and over with photographers i mentor…..i have fought this with myself all along….i suspect a solid 80% of what i start goes unfinished….folks know of the other 20%, but i coulda shoulda woulda done more….blame it on Simone??

what about you??  do you finish most things, or sooner rather than later give it up??  be honest…we are all in this together…

ok, while you take on this question, i have to go feed the cat…..no joke…she is an hour away , and i am going to go feed her instead of taking a picture….woe is me….



massimo mastrorillo – indonesia: check-in at room 101

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Massimo Mastrorillo

Indonesia: Check-in At Room 101

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This is a short selection from the on going long term project “Indonesia: check in at room 101” which began in 2005,  the day after the tsunami.

Taking a cue from the phrase “Room 101 contains the worst things in the world” from the novel “1984” by George Orwell, this project wants to tell that man, like Indonesia, seems to have lost on all  fronts.  One of these fronts is his environment:  Sidoarjo, the exploitation of resources and the intolerable levels of pollution in the Province of Riau, the deforestation in Kalimantan and in Papua.  Former American President Nixon defined Indonesia as “the largest booty in Southeast Asia” and in 1967 this loot was distributed to some of the largest Western companies. The future of Indonesia seems to be the footprint of a boot that has kicked in the face of humanity.

 

Bio:

Massimo Mastrorillo was born in Turin, Italy, and lives in Rome. He worked on long term projects about the Kurdish Diaspora and the poverty in Mozambique. From the year 2005 to the year 2007 he worked on his project The Lives of the Cities, a documentary project about 9 cities in the world. In the year 2005 he began also a long term project on the tsunami aftermath and the environment in Indonesia. This is an ongoing project. He is actually working on other two long term projects: “White Murder”, about the problem of death on the working places in Italy and “The Lands of Shattered Dreams”. Among the awards he received: the World Press Photo, the Pictures of the Year International, the Best of Photojournalism, the PDN’s Photo Annual Contest In Photojournalism, the International Photography Awards, the FNAC Prize Attenzione Talento Fotografico 2007, the International Photographer of the Year at the 5th Annual Lucie Awards, the Sony World Photography Awards.

 

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Editor’s Note: Please only one comment per person under this essay.. Further discussions should take place under Dialogue..

Many thanks… david alan harvey

john delaney – kazakh golden eagle nomads

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John Delaney

Kazakh Golden Eagle Nomads

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“Fine horses and fierce eagles are the wings of the Kazakhs.” – Ancient Kazakh Proverb

Nobody knows exactly when man tamed the golden eagle of Central Asia. Herodotus refers to nomadic hunters in 5th Century B.C. Genghis Khan is said to have had over 5,000 “eagle riders” in his personal guard. We do know that since the 15th Century, nomadic Kazakh tribes on horseback with Golden eagles have roamed freely across the borders of what is today Russia, China, Kazakhstan and Western Mongolia.

Every fall, soon after the first snowfall these majestic men will head up into the mountains in search of prey.  They will lose their eagles on any unsuspecting fox, rabbit, and even wolf.  At one time this hunt provided needed food and furs for harsh winters. Today it has become an honorable tradition and a right of passage for the Kazakh men.

But at the dawn of the 21st Century, the nomadic way of life is fragile and in danger of being eradicated.  History has long threatened these legendary horsemen: the Bolshevik Revolution, Stalin’s purges and China’s cultural revolution drove roaming Kazakhs to the mountains and valleys of Western Mongolia, where they found refuge and freedom to live as they have for centuries.

I have traveled twice to the far western edge of Mongolia to photograph the Kazakh nomads before these old traditions are lost forever. I shot this work with both large and medium format, and all with natural light. The project has been well received, winning a number of awards including the 2008 IPA/Lucie “Discovery of the Year”.

 

Bio:

John Delaney (1963) is an American photographer based in NYC. When not shooting he operates a small traditional B&W printing lab. His client list includes Bruce Davidson, Irving Penn, Richard Avedon, Annie Liebovitz.

 

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Editor’s Note: Please only one comment per person under this essay.. Further discussions should take place under Dialogue..

Many thanks… david alan harvey

todd r. behrendt – the saboteur

todd behrend the saboteur burn

 

The Saboteur by Todd R. Behrendt

Incorporating elements of collage and expressionism, The Saboteur is my response to hucksters who ruined the world economy with their rampant greed. This image is a silver gelatin print created in a traditional wet-process darkroom utilizing non-traditional techniques.

Website: Todd Behrendt

ryan scherb – emt

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Ryan Scherb

EMT

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Emergency Medical Technicians are the men and women responsible for keeping you alive from the time you get hurt, to the time you get to the hospital.  They have to be able to deal with any and every possible situation where someone’s health and survival has become compromised.

It is an experience that holds the widest range of situations, circumstances and emotions.  One day they will celebrate with a family delivering a newborn child, and the next they will help a grieving widow who has just watched her husband pass away.  Emergency caregivers see it all.

While an EMT is well trained in the necessary skills to keep a person alive, the real training starts when they get in the ambulance and head to the call, where they know little if anything about what they will encounter.

It is important to recognize EMTs for the service they provide.  Without them, countless lives would be lost in the time it takes to get to a hospital.

This essay joins the Charlottesville Albemarle Rescue Squad (C.A.R.S.) in Charlottesville, Virginia as they go on calls.  It was shot over three days in June 2008 and three more days in June 2009 as an assignment for David Alan Harvey’s workshop, “The Photographic Essay”.  “EMT” has become a larger project now and I am currently riding in New York City with the St. Vincent’s Hospital ambulance squad.  After New York I will keep working on the project in the cities of Miami, Chicago and Los Angeles. This essay has not yet been published, as it is a work in progress.

 

Bio

Ryan Scherb is currently working as a fashion and advertising photographer in New York City and is expanding into the world of documentary.  Ryan also has a background as an EMT in Connecticut where he has ridden with the Georgetown Volunteer Fire Department.

 

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Editor’s Note: Please only one comment per person under this essay.. Further discussions should take place under Dialogue..

Many thanks… david alan harvey

clara rojas – tuscany street

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Tuscany Street 2009 by Clara Rojas

 

Clara Rojas was born in Caracas, Venezuela in 1975.
Her childhood was always related to art. Music and photography has been a essential part in her family and her growing process.
She studied graphic design in the Instituto de Diseño de Caracas in Venezuela. After finishing the career she went to New York City and studied Video Digital Production at NYU.
In 2003 studied at Venezuelan recognized Taller de fotografía de Roberto Mata, from that point she decides to focus on photography. In 2004 she moved to Barcelona, Spain where she is lives now and works as a graphic designer.

kurt lengfield – pick up lines

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Pick up Lines by Kurt Lengfield

Under the watchful eyes of Mr. Miyagi, party animals seize the moment at THE BOX, a hip Charlottesville, Virginia nightspot for some fun, photography and a little bit of tail wagging. This image was taken for one of the LOOK3 Festival of the Photograph workshops in June of this past year. I hope this will grow into a photographic essay on societies night owls.

Website: Kurt Lengfield